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Toshiba 61H70 Questions

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Ed_Furcolow, Feb 27, 2002.

  1. Ed_Furcolow

    Ed_Furcolow Extra

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    I purchased a Toshiba 61H70 from BB in April of 2001. Sadly this was about 6 to 7 months before they started coming out with the anamorphic squeeze for their 4:3 sets. I felt justified getting the 4:3 because I still watch a lot of normal broadcast television, and the size of wide screen DVD's should have been comparatively the same as a 56inch 16:9. Well. as it turns out, the picture is actually bigger than a 56inch 16:9, but that's not necessarily a good thing, and is the root of all my following questions.
    You see, what the 61H70 actually does, or at least mine, is project an image that is to large to fit perfectly on the 61 inch screen. I know this because my set arrived with the picture quite obviously displayed to far to the right. I had to have a technician come in to adjust the picture. So in all, if you have your picture perfectly centered, you probably have a good 2 1/2 inches of play on each side and 1 1/2 to 2 inches of play on the top and bottom. This is all outer edge image that you are not seeing. So while the picture is VERY big, your actually seeing less of the image than you would on a standard tube. The end result of this is a larger top to bottom wide screen image than I was expecting to get. For instance, a 2:35 image should be just over 20 inches high on my screen, but ends up being just over 22 inches because the ends are slightly cut off. So in reality the height of my widescreen images is larger than a 56 inch 16:9 but the width is the same only I'm missing a little bit of the out image information. So I guess my first question would be; is this common for all 4:3 RPTV's or did I get a lemon?
    My next question concerns something I can only describe as a compressed image. This occurs on the left side of my screen and what happens is that when a camera pans to the left it looks as though everything on the far left side of the screen is compressing inward, and if the camera pans right everything expands outward from the left side of the screen. It's not as drastic as it sounds, and to someone who wasn't picky, or looking for it, you might not even pick up on it. But seeing as it's my set, it's pretty much the only place my eyes go when ever there is a camera pan. Is this also a common problem in 4:3 RPTV's and does anyone know the cause or cure?
    My last question concerns DVD players I'm getting for the TV. I know this section is for monitors, but this pertains directly to the problem I described about the image being larger than the screen. I'm now on my 3rd prog-scan player. My first was a Panasonic that had serious issues with any image displaying diagonal or intricate detail. It wasn't bad alliasing, but ghost images. For instance, the scene in Phantom Menace in the senate building when the Queen and Palpatine (spelling?) are hovering down to the center of the room to make their case, all you would see were constant ghost images from the bluishwhite lights on all the pods lined up on the walls. Very ugly. So I took the Panasonic back and got a JVC XV-SA75. The picture on this player is incredible, but I was told by someone that I should actually get a Toshiba DVD player since Toshiba uses what they call "Colorstream," instead of Composite video. So I picked up the Toshiba SD-3750 to see how it looked. The JVC actually still has the better picture, but the Toshiba has the ability to center zoomed images. What this allows me to do is zoom out on a wide screen image and then center the picture so that I'm now seeing the whole image. My problem is that the image on the Toshiba is really no where near as sharp as on the JVC, and the only thing I would use the zoom out for is 1:85 images, because the 2;35 isn't actually as bad as it sounds with the extreme ends not showing. You probably wouldn't even notice if I didn't tell you it was happening. But with 1:85 images, the difference is a little more noticeable. Now that I have the ability to zoom out of 1:85 images, I know see I was really missing quite a bit of the picture. My dilemma is that I'm now stuck in a situation where it looks as though I'm going to have to keep both players. One for 2:35 movies and the other for 1:85. This is a VERY expensive solution. Has anyone else been down this road, and if so, what was your solution.
    Thanks in advance for replies to any of the questions, and sorry for rambling on to much. [​IMG]
     
  2. Jay Mitchosky

    Jay Mitchosky Producer

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  3. Ed_Furcolow

    Ed_Furcolow Extra

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    Thanks for the helpful answers. When you say that zoom destroys the original aspect ratio, I agree that this is what happens when you are zooming "in" on the image which a lot of people do because they can't stand the black bars, but I'm using it in the exact opposite fashion. I'm actually zooming out and increasing the size of the black bars so that I'm now seeing the image that is being lost to overscan. I'm assuming you mean that the zoom feature somehow distorts the entire image similar to the way a 16:9 does to make a 4:3 picture fit its screen, but it looks to me that when I zoom out the image remains the same proportionally, it's just that the entire picture gets a little smaller so that I'm now seeing what was previously cut off on the ends. Would you be able to elaborate as to how it destroys the original aspect ratio?

    By the way, I love your home set up. I've actually been to your site many times in the past. Very classy looking.
     
  4. Jay Mitchosky

    Jay Mitchosky Producer

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    Ah, I didn't realize you could "reverse" zoom. It seems that you're really concerned about the horizontal overscan. I would suggest either having a tech come by and adjust it, or review the archives here for instructions how to do it yourself. To get it much less than 4% on either side is very difficult as the optics start to struggle. Use Video Essentials or Avia to measure where you're at now for comparative purposes. Each have overscan test patterns that show you percentages for horizontal and vertical overscan.
     
  5. Ed_Furcolow

    Ed_Furcolow Extra

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    Unfortunately, you have no idea how hard it is to get a "real" technician out to my house. I'm in Canton, Ohio and for some reason, there just aren't that many Toshiba authorized technicians out here. So it looks like I'm going to be sticking with two DVD players. The JVC for 2:35 movies and the Toshiba for 1:85. Not the most cost affective solution in the world, but about the only one I can come up with that will satisfy me. Thanks again for your help.
     

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