Repair Question: Dryer Vent

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Pamela, Jun 9, 2005.

  1. Pamela

    Pamela Supporting Actor

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    My dryer vent on the outside of my garage is coming off. It was held on by four screws, three of which have now come out and the fourth one is ready to come out. The garage is old—constructed with wood, and stucco on the outside. The stucco has crumbled where the screws were.

    I called the handyman, who was going to come over and fix it. Problem is, he is unreliable and of course, never showed up. So, I would like to fix it myself. Would filling the holes with putty and putting the screws back in work?

    Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks!
     
  2. DonnyD

    DonnyD Screenwriter

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    Yes, the area around the vent that has deteriorated needs repairs first.... be sure to use an exterior rated product..such as wood putty.... after that cures/dries per package recommendations, re-attach the vent........
     
  3. Mort Corey

    Mort Corey Supporting Actor

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    For a down and dirty quick fix you could just re-attach it to the house with some silicone. Kinda depends on who owns the house as to how much repair work you want to get into. If it was originally screwed into the studs, it could be that the area has some dry rot from the moisture expelled by the vent.

    Mort
     
  4. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    here's what i think you should do.

    1. repair the stucco by filling in the holes

    2. if the wood is right below the stucco, then you can buy some long wood screws ... but pre-drill the stucco first so it doesn't crack on you.

    3. if there is only stucco available to screw in, get the screws that include plastic anchors. you tap the anchor into the hole first, then drive the screw into it. the anchor "expands" and helps bite into the wall.

    4. buy screws just big enough to do the job ... don't "over-engineer" this. [​IMG]

    i don't think screwing into putty or stucco (by itself) is a good idea. the screw won't really have anything to bite into ... hence the plastic anchors.

    this is a very doable diy project ... should take you 30 minutes tops. good luck!

    edit: oh yeah, if you really want to go for it, buy some clear silicone sealant ... then caulk the thing. that will help prevent any water/moisture from getting behind the vent panel and possibly causing future rot.
     

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