Red Push Attenuator. I do not know how to make it. Anyone sell good ones???

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jeff Rogers, Aug 3, 2002.

  1. Jeff Rogers

    Jeff Rogers Second Unit

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    I have decided that I need to get rid of the push. It is near the 20% level and I would like it gone..
    But...as I am technically know how dumb...I would really like to know if there are pre-made ones that work just as good as the do-it-yourself ones.
    I was reading over on Hometheaterspot and they say that Radio Shacks ones are a little heavy and might damage the actual input on the tv.
    Any suggestions?[​IMG]
     
  2. HuynH

    HuynH Extra

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    check in the "Yardsale" at the Spot, a few people have been selling these recently.
     
  3. BruceSpielbauer

    BruceSpielbauer Second Unit

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    The reply above is a good one... there are people selling their old ones right now. One guy posted he had 3 old ones for sale a couple of days ago. In most cases, they no longer need them because they have found some other means of eliminating the red push, or they have hired a calibrator do do the same.

    There is also a guy over there that builds a VERY high quality one, and has them ready to sell. But the price is steep (about $60). His name is John Yerringto. Do a search under his name "Yerringto" and you can find how to contact him that way.

    And, another alternate route is to purchase the Radio Shack adjustable attenuator, but to place it "away" from the actual input on the set. This is what I did, and it eliminates the fear of putting too much "weight" on the input. It requires:

    1.) The attenuator
    2.) A very short component cable, the shortest you can find.
    3.) Two of the "F to Phono Adapters"
    4.) Your existing component cable.

    You plug the short component cable into the back of the set. You plug one of the "F to Phono Adapters" into that. You plug the adjustable attenuator's "OUT" side into this "F to Phono Adapter."

    Now, plug the second "F to Phono Adapter" into the adjustable attenuator's IN side. Then, you plug your existing (longer) component cable into the second "F to Phono Adapter," and run it to the component you are trying to hook up (DVD player, or Set top box).

    This way, the junction ends up away from any input or output jacks, and typically ends up simply laying on the floor, behind the set. There is no "extra strain" on any inputs, at all. The Radio Shack attenuator is inexpensive, and you can "dial out" the red push, until you achieve as close to 0% as possible. It worked great for mine, until I got spoiled and wanted the same for all inputs, Then, I performed the I2C fix (since I have a Mits) and was able to unplug the entire rig.

    -Bruce in Chi-Town
     
  4. Jeff Rogers

    Jeff Rogers Second Unit

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    Cool. I think I will do that. I am 6 min away from Radio Shack [​IMG]
    Also... regarding overscan... I have a slight proble with that right out of the box....it is off just a tad..
    IS that covered during the first 30 days by the manuf. warranty? I should have to pay for this since there is no way to fix it right?
     

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