Recommendations for properly splitting signals

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by John_Berger, Jul 14, 2002.

  1. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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    I'm running into a slight problem with my theater setup. It's not a big deal and one that I've been living with, but if I can correct it, that's all the better.

    Currently, we have our cable (as in pay-cable-services coxial cable) going all over the house. Unfortunately, the cable comes into the house on the exact opposite side (lengthwise as well) from the HT setup.

    As it comes into the house, it gets split four ways - two for direct connection to the basement and office TVs, one for the "computer room" TV, and one for connection to the HT. This is a basic splitter - it is not powered on any way.

    At the HT area, it is then further split multiple ways - one to the TV, one to the digital cable box, and one to the VCR. This splitter, however, is powered and has RF filtering built into it. In all instances, I have made sure to "cap" the open connectors to continue the signal loop.

    The problem that I'm seeing, and again it's not a big deal but one that I would like to resolve if I can, is that low-frequency channels at the HT area are very grainy when compared to higher-frequency channels. I'm not getting any ghosting, just a grainy picture. Adjusting the signal strength on the powered sliptter does not produce any better results.

    However, the same channels that are not connected to the HT (basement, office, and computer room) are bright and clear. The one TV in the basement is also the same distance away from as the HT setup. They are both using the exact same type and length of coax cable.

    As a test, I tried to put a signal booster at the main junction, but that made the picture on the HT even worse.

    Without having to completley rewire the place, can anyone offer some suggestions to try to clean up the signals to the HT area?
     
  2. LewB

    LewB Screenwriter

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    John:
    Have you tried:
    • Connecting a TV to the wire that is feeding the signal booster? Maybe that cable is bad...
    • Remove the amp from the equation. Amps will amplify bad as well as good signals (stuff in, MORE stuff out)
    • Check the range of frequencies that the splitter will pass, this is usually stamped on the splitter itself . Use splitters that go above 900Mhz (more expensive but fixed problems I've had with bad cable signals.)
    Good luck !
     
  3. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    John,

     
  4. Geoff S

    Geoff S Stunt Coordinator

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    I don't know if this is the case, but if it is....

    If you're using regular cable displayed on an HDTV it will indeed look grainy and there's nothing you can do about it.

    If this is the case there's nothing you can do except try to force it to display at 480i instead of 480p.
     
  5. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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    Sweet! I'll give these a try and see what happens! Need I assume that Radio Shack will have the 900 MHz splitters, or is there someplace else that actually has reasonable prices? [​IMG]
    Thanks, guys!
     
  6. LewB

    LewB Screenwriter

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    John:
    Just to clarify, you want splitters that go above 900Mhz. I'm not sure on what the upper end of these are but I think I've seen them up around 2GHz.
    I've seen them in Radio Shack, Best Buy and Circuit City. I actually got mine from my cable company when they came out to check my signal. The guy gave them to me for free [​IMG] [​IMG]
     

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