projecting thru glass?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Bobby_K, Dec 12, 2005.

  1. Bobby_K

    Bobby_K Extra

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    I am reconfiguring my basement theater, and the PJ is now ceiling mounted behind a wall, projecting thru a 10x16" hole in the drywall. The water heater and furnace are in the area behind the wall, and noise coming in from that opening is going to be an issue.

    Would glass about 2ft from the lens cause distorsion in the image? This would solve all my problems if it works, don't have a piece lying around right now to try out.

    thanks in advance for all input.
     
  2. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
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    You will want to get the best glass possible to minimize distortion. I'm sure a local glass shop will have something for you. If you want to go all out you can get some Edmunds Optical glass, but that might set you back more money.

    http://www.edmundoptics.com/us/index.cfm
     
  3. Keith Outhouse

    Keith Outhouse Stunt Coordinator

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  4. Bobby_K

    Bobby_K Extra

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    maybe plexiglass is the way to go? found some neat stuff at
    estreetplastics.com. they offer standard and non-glare. hard to figure if the non-glare would work for or against my purposes. its cheap enough to gamble on though.
     
  5. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
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    Be aware that nonglare materials may use surface texture to scatter light causing the glare. This is counterproductive for projecting through as it will diminish the amount of light passing through as well as introduce the texture into the image.
     
  6. Bobby_K

    Bobby_K Extra

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    thats what i figured. Im going to order the standard thinest, clearest piece they offer and give it a go.
     
  7. Leo Kerr

    Leo Kerr Screenwriter

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    I wouldn't recommend plex.

    Also, another tradition to keep in mind is that the glass should not be parallel to the screen and projector, but rather at a slight angle - perhaps only 5-degrees or so. This will help reduce reflections generated by the glass from hitting the screen.

    Leo
     
  8. Parker Clack

    Parker Clack Schizophrenic Man
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    I would recommend glass too. I really like the quality of the products that Edmund Optics has. Might has well spend a little extra to get the outcome that you want the first time.

    Parker
     
  9. Leo Kerr

    Leo Kerr Screenwriter

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    I don't know if Edmund is the best place to go, but here's some more specific advice:

    You probably want boro-silicate float glass. I know it's available in 1/16" sheets (I use that in glass gobos for stage use - very high temperature.)

    Actually, Edmund has some nice looking borofloat (Schott's branding) and antireflective coated float "windows" at probably fairly reasonable prices (particularly since you're only looking to get one.)

    Leo Kerr
     
  10. Bobby_K

    Bobby_K Extra

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    so I finally got everything wired this weekend, and grabbed a piece of glass to place in front of the lens as a test. just a clear, thin piece of glass, part of a door on an armoir I was dismantling.

    Right of the bat, there is no discernable change in image quality. In fact, you can run the glass in and out of the beam and you would'nt even know it was there if it weren't for the shadows from the edge. Then, after a few minutes, I swear the image improved with the glass in place. It seemed to lessen the screen door effect ever so slightly, and soften the image slightly as well. you never know untill you try.
     

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