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Holographic Disc to Store One Terabyte of Data!?

Discussion in 'DVD' started by Chris Will, Sep 2, 2004.

  1. Chris Will

    Chris Will Screenwriter

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    Go here for more info from teamxbox.com.

    This could be interesting. I don't think we will see this anytime soon especial for consumer video releases but, it would be cool to have an entire season of Deep Space Nine on 1 holographic disc.

    Anyway, I though that is was interesting even if it never comes to anything.
     
  2. JackKay

    JackKay Second Unit

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    This will be the perfect player for my ULTRA HDTV that displays movies in 4K that I someday would like to have.

    From the Engineer:
    A prototype digital video system producing images of such high quality that the human eye struggles to distinguish them from reality has been developed by Japanese engineers at NHK.
    A prototype digital video system producing images of such high quality that the human eye struggles to distinguish them from reality has been developed by Japanese engineers.
    The system, called ultra high definition video (UHDV), achieves image resolution 16 times greater than even the most advanced video broadcasting technologies now available.
    Its developers at the Japan Broadcasting Corporation (NHK) said the system could be used to provide an ultra realistic 'immersive' viewing experience when, for example, showing sporting events.
    UHDV displays images with 4,000 horizontal scanning lines, compared to the 1,000 offered by the current state-of-the-art high definition television (HDTV) technology and just 625 for standard TV broadcasts. When horizontal and vertical scanning are both taken into account a UHDV picture contains 16 times the number of pixels — individual image components - of HDTV.
    NHK, which unveiled details of UHDV for the first time at broadcast technology conference IBC in Amsterdam, said its engineers had to custom-design a video camera, data-storage device and projection system, as no standard broadcasting equipment could cope with their extreme demands.
    The camera was built by aligning four 2.5in charge coupled device (CCD) image-capture panels. The projector system uses four liquid crystal-on-silicon panels, two of which process green light while the other two each handle red and blue. These must be aligned to an accuracy of within 0.5 of a pixel - there are 33 million pixels on display - to achieve ultra high definition results.
    Recording the massive amounts of data needed to produce UHDV definition also posed a problem for NHK. Its engineers were originally only able to make 34 seconds' worth of recording. They have now built a disc recorder system made up of 16 HDTV recorder units with a capacity of about 3.5 terabytes, allowing them to shoot 18 minutes of UHDV footage.
    NHK researcher Dr. Kohji Mitani said the project team had shot a three-minute demonstration video by attaching the camera to the front of a vehicle and driving it around the streets.
    The footage was then shown to members of the public on a 4x7m wide-angle screen provoking, according to Mitani, gasps of astonishment. Some viewers even experienced nausea because of the ultra realistic visual effect of speed without the usual physical sensation of movement.
    Mitani said the system was still at a basic stage of development, but he claimed it had proved that image qualities so realistic that they approximated to actually being at the recorded event were possible.
    NHK will now attempt to reduce the size of the camera and look at the possibility of developing transmission systems that could broadcast UHDV footage.
    Dr. Nicolas Lodge of UK broadcast technology specialist Pro-Vision Communications, who chaired the IBC session at which UHDV was presented, said the NHK work was 'amazing stuff. They are on the way to creating an experience that mimics actually being there. It is an exciting area of research'.

    Makes you wonder why so many movies are being digitally recorded in 4K.
     
  3. Travis W.

    Travis W. Second Unit

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    Now if only we could get some flying cars then this would definitely be the 21st century...[​IMG]
     
  4. JackKay

    JackKay Second Unit

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  5. ChristopherDAC

    ChristopherDAC Producer

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    The holographic-disc idea is intriguing, but that technology [as well as the "fluorescent multilayer disc"] has been around for years -- as a matter of fact was used in an early attempt at a home-video system -- without producing any results yet. Of course, we may get lucky this time.

    What the NHK has invented this time is a digital version of the ShowScan system. I would bet anything that it operates at a frame rate of 60Hz, and the resolution is comparable to that on 70mm film prints. Since the resolution of the eye drops off dramatically with image time rate of change, all the brain knows is that the image is more detailed than the eye can sense, and the optical cortex says "reality". I'd feel nauseated too if I were strapped to the bumper of a car in Tokyo traffic! Perhaps they will solve the equipment problems which crippled Trumbull's system.

    And what can you say about flying cars, besides "the way most people drive, I wouldn't want them over my head!"
     
  6. Jason Adams

    Jason Adams Supporting Actor

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  7. Gary->dee

    Gary->dee Screenwriter

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    Exactly, Christopher.

    As far as the one terabyte disc format, sounds exciting, but to be honest I'm still waiting for a holographic projection system myself.
     
  8. David Forbes

    David Forbes Supporting Actor

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    Flying cars would be cool only if I had the only one. Then when I'm stuck in traffic I could say, "See ya, suckers!" and take off vertically a la the Spinners from Blade Runner.

    But to allow other yahoos to have one? No way!
     
  9. Grant H

    Grant H Cinematographer

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    I would think that all the traffic would have to be controlled by computer. You'd just enter your destination and the master computer would see that you got there safely. Letting individuals control them would be entirely too random. Of course, we've wanted to do the same thing with cars on the ground for a long time.[​IMG]

    I believe both have been portrayed on film. Usually there's some kind of manual override though.

    Yeah, maybe eventually we'll get Superman's holographic video system, data crystals and all. It certainly makes sense. Dual-layer DVD's already read more than one layer, so it's not just a flat surface being read. Seems to me, the sticking point was actually being able to construct something with all the different data layers. Gluing together 2 discs was tough enough for a while. But, maybe some day we'll have data cubes or even marbles that we can drop and have them roll underneath our furniture.
     
  10. Carl Johnson

    Carl Johnson Cinematographer

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    The thought of having a central computer control these flying cars crossed my mind too but what happens when one of them breaks down? Even if we had the technology to build them the only way I could see flying cars being viable during my lifetime is if they fly no more than a few feet off of the ground.
     
  11. Dan Rudolph

    Dan Rudolph Producer

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    I would think you would put computers in each car and have them coordinate with each other. If you needed a central computer at all, I'm sure there would be ways to make them manage without it in a pinch.
     
  12. Mike Soltis

    Mike Soltis Stunt Coordinator

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    Just so the 'central computer' doesn't run on a micro$oft operating system...
    "Thousands stranded over Tampa today as the Tampa Traffic Computer crashed after yet another software patch. Bill Gates could not be reached for comment."
     
  13. ThomasC

    ThomasC Lead Actor

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    I think it's a lot easier to do auto-pilot in the air than it is on the ground. In the air, you don't have to worry about cars braking in front of you, traffic lights, stop signs, yield signs, etc. The cost of reconstructing an entire nation's worth of roadways to adapt to automated ground vehicles would be entirely too massive.

    The test for people to get manual operating licenses for flying cars should very hard to pass. People that don't want to take the test or can't pass it must get a vehicle that is auto-pilot only. If somehow, the auto-pilot computer crashes, the vehicle will be instructed to stop as soon as possible and wait for assistance from someone who has a manual operating license. The Seattle Times article states that it will take at least 25 years until we get anything "remotely Jetsons-like." I'm not expecting flying cars until I retire, and I'm not graduating from college until at least August 2005.
     
  14. Marc Bax

    Marc Bax Second Unit

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    Wow talk about threadjacking. Flying cars wtf.
     

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