Any Police Officers out there? What should I expect from the oral board interview?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Eric M Jones, Feb 27, 2002.

  1. Eric M Jones

    Eric M Jones Second Unit

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2000
    Messages:
    393
    Likes Received:
    0
    Title says it all. I'm in pursuit of a police offier job and will be undergoing oral boards for a couple of agencies in the next week.

    Any tips or just general information?

    -EJ
     
  2. Van Patton

    Van Patton Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2001
    Messages:
    456
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yeah, don't pull people over at 1:30 AM and bitch at them for trying to get home quickly on a road where there's nobody on it!!
     
  3. Graham Perks

    Graham Perks Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 1998
    Messages:
    327
    Likes Received:
    3
    Sorry I don't have any words of advice (I'm not a policeman, my brother is!)

    But best of luck!
     
  4. Brian Harnish

    Brian Harnish Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2000
    Messages:
    1,216
    Likes Received:
    0
    Good luck! [​IMG]
    Question: what's an oral board?
     
  5. Henry Carmona

    Henry Carmona Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2000
    Messages:
    1,299
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    San Antonio
    Real Name:
    Henry Carmona
    Good one Van!!!
     
  6. Oscar W

    Oscar W Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2000
    Messages:
    105
    Likes Received:
    0
    Brian- an oral board is like a job interview, instead of a one-on-one type interview a board is made up of several persons that ask you questions.
    Eric-
    Boards can vary from place to place. Some of the ones I've been through and some from friends of mine are:
    -anywhere from 3-7 board members
    -can last from 20 minutes up to 1-hour in length
    -all the questions are standard for all the applicants, they don't ask different questions
    -there are general question type boards and hostile boards. Hostile boards will try to aggravate, confuse, frustrate and stress you out and make you change your answers. Stick to your guns (so to speak), stand by and defend your answers.
    -ethics type questions
    EX: you stop a guy for a possible DWI, turns out he is an off-duty police officer. At the scene you are unable to determine his level of intoxication, what do you do?
    EX: you and your partner are about to testify at a trial. Before the trial you speak with the DA. Your partner makes statements that are not true and could affect the outcome of the case, what do you do?
    -affirmative action questions
    EX: your opinion of it, your definition of it, etc.
    -scenario questions; if it is a specialty type of LE job (like mine) expect questions regarding that specialty.
    -usually at the end of a board they will ask if you have any comments. Take this time to sell yourself. Why should they hire you? What can you do for them? Do you have any special certifications, EMT, foreign language skills, etc.
    Relax, don't let the board 'get to you'. Stick by your answers and give them full and complete answers explaining why you feel your answer is right. LE is all about how well you can articulate your position, reports and why you did what you did.
    GOOD LUCK!
     
  7. Randy Tennison

    Randy Tennison Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 1999
    Messages:
    1,099
    Likes Received:
    0
    Real Name:
    Randy
    That was good advise. Remember, there is often not a right or wrong answer they are looking for. For example, whatever you do in the drunk police officer question is right (arrest or not arrest) if you justify the actions you are taking. Explain why you took the actions of arresting him (police officers have to set the standard) or why you didn't arrest him (this would obviously greatly embarass the department and the city). Decided if you would alert his supervisor.

    Another question we use "How long is it reasonable for the city to expect you to stay with our small department?". Wrong answer - forever. We don't pay a lot, and people move on. We understand that. Good answer - state a definative time, and express your desire to advance you career.

    By the way, brush up on the "What is the difference between probable cause and reasonable suspicion?" question. It's on our oral board, and it amazes me how many people can't explain the difference, even right after they graduate the academy.

    Most of all, relax, have confidence (but not cockiness), smile, speak to all of the members, make eye contact, and be professional. No foul language, no racial comments, or other commen cop speak.

    Good Luck - Knock Em Dead!
     
  8. DennisHP

    DennisHP Second Unit

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2000
    Messages:
    352
    Likes Received:
    0
    Eric,
    Head over to www.GlockTalk.com There is a forum there for asking LEO's (Law Enforcement Officers) these types of questions that will get answered by real Policemen. Plus, there is plenty of info on the duty carry of choice... Glocks.
     
  9. Oscar W

    Oscar W Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2000
    Messages:
    105
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  10. Eric M Jones

    Eric M Jones Second Unit

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2000
    Messages:
    393
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just wanted to say thanks to everyone who replied.

    I had my first board today. It seemed to go pretty well although there are a few things I said that I'd like to change now. Anyway it was a good experience and I'll have a better idea of what it's all about when I go to the next one.

    I left this morning before I had a chance to check this thread I wish I had read Oscar's comments before hand. After being there and then reading his comment about articulating your position I can now see I need a little bit of polish in my thoughts and opinions.

    Anyway thanks again,

    -Eric
     

Share This Page