2.35.1, 1.85.1, Anamorphic.... etc.. someone please school me :)

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jim Carr, Jan 12, 2002.

  1. Jim Carr

    Jim Carr Stunt Coordinator

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    What does all this mean? 2.35.1, 1.85.. I know these are aspect ratios but which is better? I don't quite understand.

    I have a 16:9 TV... which are the best for me? None of them seem to really 'fill' my screen?

    thanks!

    Jim
     
  2. Steve Felix

    Steve Felix Supporting Actor

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    There isn't an aspect ratio that's strictly "better" (although I like movies wide); the best ratio for a particular movie is the one that the director and cinematographer framed their shots for.

    1.85:1 should be filling your screen (practically), but filling the screen is not the goal, maintaining visual choices is.

    Edit: And anamorphic means that the image on the disc is squeezed but automatically stretched out by your player, meaning the full possible resolution of DVD is taken advantage of without wasting space on black bars. As an HDTV owner you definitely want to be looking for discs that are anamorphic, or "enhanced for widescreen TVs."
     
  3. Cees Alons

    Cees Alons Moderator
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    Jim,

    Because most monitors aren't flexible (well, projection screens aren't either, but can be adjusted more easily), they had to find a reasonable compromise. Older films were shot to have images with a 3x4 ratio (almost), like TV screens. But then wider film images were invented, partly to compete with TV. Because film wasn't too flexible either, they also had various techniques to squeeze it onto current film (AND have more complicated soundtracks as well).

    So that's why films exist that were shot in a 2.35:1 ratio, or even wider, as well as more close to 1.85. To make TV screens be used more effective, they added a new format, 16x9 (= 1.778), close to 1.85, a current movie standard.

    As long as a film image has a ratio that's different from the one of your screen, you either cannot see the whole image (bad) - although you payed for the whole movie - or else some parts of the screen will have to stay black (not beautiful, but not THAT bad).

    Cees
     
  4. Joshua Clinard

    Joshua Clinard Screenwriter

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  5. Jim Carr

    Jim Carr Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks guys... you have been a great help!
     
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    Matt Giggey Stunt Coordinator

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    Jeff Ulmer Producer

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  9. Patrick McCart

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    Pick movies by what you like, not the screen aspect ratio.

    For example, Cast Away is a 1.85:1 film. Depending on how your screen is calibrated, the film will nearly fill the screen with tiny ribbons of black on the top and bottom.

    Planet of the Apes is 2.35:1, so you'll get a shorter image.

    But...when both of these films have the "black bars," they are being shown correctly. Even on 16x9 TV's.

    The only formats that will NOT have black bars on a 16x9 TV are 1.78:1 anamorphic widescreen films such as North By Northwest, The Godfather Trilogy, and Fantasia 2000.

    1.66:1 anamorphic films will have some small bars on the SIDES to ensure that the proper image is kept. Some Disney films are this way.

    Also, 1.33:1 movies such as Gone With The Wind will have black bars on the sides. The 16x9 TV is the ideal way to see widescreen cinema in your home.
     
  10. GlennH

    GlennH Cinematographer

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