11 Greatest Unanswered Questions of Physics

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Kenneth, Jan 3, 2002.

  1. Kenneth

    Kenneth Supporting Actor

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    The February issue of Discover magazine has this as their cover story (not on their website yet, unfortunately). Here are the questions:

     
  2. SteveGon

    SteveGon Executive Producer

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    Interesting stuff. I recently did some reading on these topics. Made my head hurt, but interesting nonetheless! [​IMG]
     
  3. BrianW

    BrianW Cinematographer

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    I thought protons were recently shown not to be unstable.

    I'll try to find the source and post back here.
     
  4. Kevin P

    Kevin P Screenwriter

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  5. Kenneth

    Kenneth Supporting Actor

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    Their question about the heavy elements revolved around the early universe. Here is their quote:

     
  6. Gregory

    Gregory Extra

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    I thought the holy grail of phisics is the theory of everthing.
     
  7. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Dark matter is what intrigues me the most. Considering that it makes up the bulk of the Universe, I've wondered about its implications for interstellar travel.
     
  8. Carlo Medina

    Carlo Medina Executive Producer

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    Jeez, Jack, I'd hate to tell you what I think about in my spare time... [​IMG]
     
  9. Kenneth

    Kenneth Supporting Actor

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  10. SteveA

    SteveA Supporting Actor

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    The greatest unanswered questions in physics are the ones that we cannot even ask. Just as a dog does not have the mental capacity to comprehend calculus - or even be aware that it exists, there are certainly phenomena in nature and physics that are beyond our grasp. There are questions - and answers - that are so far beyond our abilities that we can't even conceive of them!
     
  11. Darren Davis

    Darren Davis Stunt Coordinator

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  12. Steve Enemark

    Steve Enemark Second Unit

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  13. Kenneth

    Kenneth Supporting Actor

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    Here is an exerpt of their Dark Matter material:

     
  14. Chuck C

    Chuck C Cinematographer

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  15. isobel meldar

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    Chuck you should read Flatland by Edwin Abbott. i'm sure it was the inspiration for your teacher's demonstration as it was written in 1880. despite essentially being a math and philosophy book it is a very easy read and a very interesting look at the idea of higher dimensions. (also a satire of Victorian England if you're into that kind of thing)
     
  16. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    If I remember from the show Cosmos.. they explained that each dimension expands on an axis that is perpendicular to the previous one.

    ie: to go from a 2 dimensional world (x & y axis) to a 3 dimensional one, you need to move perpendicularily to both the x & y axis (z axis). Now, try to imagine a fourth axis that is "perpendicular" to x y and z! That would be the 4th dimension. It's hard to comprehend because our minds and bodies are accustomed to their 3D existence.

    Another way to try and think about it, is if you imagine a sphere that encloses a given space. Now, imagine the surface of that sphere curving in the opposite direction, yet, enclosing the same space.... it makes my head spin.
     
  17. ikiru

    ikiru Stunt Coordinator

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  18. Joseph Howard

    Joseph Howard Stunt Coordinator

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  19. Kevin P

    Kevin P Screenwriter

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  20. ikiru

    ikiru Stunt Coordinator

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    Physics is a second order science that is used to explain how things work, never how things came to be. The tools and methodologies used to explain how things work are not suitable for first order events (creation, etc...).

    In my post, I was referring to physics. I guess philosophy could be called a science as well.

    -ikiru
     

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