The Difficulty of Restoration and Preservation in 2K/4K

Discussion in 'Blu-ray and UHD' started by sampsoninc916, Jul 20, 2014.

  1. bruceames

    bruceames Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2007
    Messages:
    741
    Likes Received:
    268
    Real Name:
    Bruce Ames
    If a 4k scan will capture all the information then the only difficulty in preservation I see is in the cost of the scan. Once the film has been scanned in 4k (or a higher resolution if necessary), then that film should be preserved forever in digital form, and any restoration work can be done without any time pressure brought about by deterioration.
     
  2. Billy Batson

    Billy Batson Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Messages:
    2,093
    Likes Received:
    650
    Location:
    London
    Real Name:
    Alan
    Ooo, I don't think so. If you'd scanned a movie ten years ago, what would it be, a 1K - 2K scan? And that would be your lot if you'd thrown away the negs, which if stored properly would be fine. And they still haven't worked out the long term storage of digital. The idea these days is you keep the film 'till it's dust in your hands.
     
    Retro00064 likes this.
  3. Dr Griffin

    Dr Griffin Cinematographer

    Joined:
    May 30, 2012
    Messages:
    2,425
    Likes Received:
    1,385
    Location:
    The wilds of Pennsylvania
    Real Name:
    Stanley
  4. bruceames

    bruceames Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2007
    Messages:
    741
    Likes Received:
    268
    Real Name:
    Bruce Ames
    I meant scanning a film in 4k now and then seeing what will provide source material in 10 years time. Of course a 1-2 scan isn't capturing nearly all the material so the negative will be a much better source.
     
  5. FoxyMulder

    FoxyMulder 映画ファン

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2009
    Messages:
    5,236
    Likes Received:
    1,613
    Location:
    Scotland
    Real Name:
    Malcolm
    Technology is always improving and better scanners will be developed so i don't think it's that simple, 4K scans won't capture all the detail on every film and it's a something that would be looked upon on a case by case basis, i'd like to see all the film studio's of the world unite and put funds into a preservation pot, those funds to be used for restoration of films which are reaching critical mass and almost beyond saving. They could probably use that to offset some of their taxes so it's a win- win situation for all.
     
  6. Rob_Ray

    Rob_Ray Screenwriter
    Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2004
    Messages:
    1,815
    Likes Received:
    1,106
    Location:
    Southern California
    Real Name:
    Rob Ray
    Digital is not a long-term preservation medium, because it requires something that can decode all those zeroes and ones and that something keeps evolving. Film is analog and as long as it holds up can be read by simply shining a light through it. You never want to throw away an analog source. With proper care, an 1890s cylinder disc will be readable in some fashion long after all CD copies made from it become coasters.
     
    Retro00064 likes this.
  7. Billy Batson

    Billy Batson Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Messages:
    2,093
    Likes Received:
    650
    Location:
    London
    Real Name:
    Alan
    I don't know if they've started doing it yet, but there's talk of the best & safest way to store these digital scans is to make b/w separation masters of them on 35mm...back to film! My niece has taken thousands of digital pictures of her son over the years (he's 9 now), I told her to sort out the best ones & have good non-fade prints made, put them in a book & seal it, & that's a guarantee he'll have some pictures to show his kids.
     
    bruceames likes this.
  8. Vic Pardo

    Vic Pardo Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2013
    Messages:
    1,059
    Likes Received:
    498
    Centuries from now (or maybe less), our descendants, survivors of some future apocalypse seeking to restore a stable society, will be digging through the rubble of our cities to try to figure out what kind of civilization we had. They'll find memory cards, computer disks, CDs, DVDs, videotape, hard drives, etc. and not know what the hell they are. They'll find photographs of the 20th century preserved on durable photographic paper and be able to SEE what we were like. They'll find 35mm film prints and hold them up to the light and figure out what they were for and look at the sprockets on one side and the squiggly lines on the other and figure out how to reverse engineer a projector to move the film past a light and read the soundtrack. So they'll be able to figure out a lot of the 20th century. But the 21st century (and after) will be a complete blank to them. :eek:
     
  9. Worth

    Worth Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,700
    Likes Received:
    612
    Real Name:
    Nick Dobbs
    I don't think there's an absolute consensus. I recently read an interview with an Australian cinematographer who felt that the minimum standard for scanning 35mm should be 12K.
     
  10. FoxyMulder

    FoxyMulder 映画ファン

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2009
    Messages:
    5,236
    Likes Received:
    1,613
    Location:
    Scotland
    Real Name:
    Malcolm
    Nah, that's just not going to happen, the apes will have taken over by then and they will only be interested in stuffing their faces with bananas, nuts, forest leaves, a little bit of meat and collecting Charlton Heston memorabilia.
     
    MatthewA and OliverK like this.

Share This Page