Winter/Ice tires affecting fuel economy?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Chris PC, Nov 25, 2004.

  1. Chris PC

    Chris PC Producer

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    Just wondering if anyone has any experience with whether winter ice/snow tires greatly affect fuel economy. I'm looking at mounting a set of 185/75 R14 Nordic Winter Trac tires on my cars steel rims for the winter. The tire will be the same size as stock. Winter tires are softer and have chunky treads, so I wonder how much it will negatively affect my gas mileage. Its cold in Toronto, so the tires won't be too soft, but I wonder if anyone has experience with the newer winter tires and fuel economy. Not the old snow tires, I'm talking about the newer soft compound winter/ice tires. The ones I'm considering using are Nordic Winter Trac from Canadian Tire (made by Uniroyal).

    thanx in advance for any feedback [​IMG]
     
  2. DwightK

    DwightK Second Unit

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    Been running same size studded winter tires for the past 2 years during the nasty months. Gas mileage went down about 2-3 mpg from summer tires. The winter tires are VERY soft and sticky. I am starting this winter off using some highly siped all weather tires and will switch to studs if I am not happy.

    So from 30 mpg to 27 or so.
     
  3. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

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    As with Dwight, I usually only notice a couple MPG difference. Not a huge deal for the added safety and peace of mind.
     
  4. Aaron Reynolds

    Aaron Reynolds Screenwriter

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    Won't the winter additives in the gas also bring down the gas mileage?
     
  5. Chris PC

    Chris PC Producer

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    I've thought of simply getting all season tires siped. I heard there are places where you can take your all season tires and they will sipe them for you. You could do it yourself with a razor blade but it would take a long time and you couldn't really make sipe grooves, only sipe slits, unless you wanted to mangle your tires.

    Well, the tires are very inexpensive, so I'll pick em up, mount them to my steel rims and see how I like them. If they're too noisy or eat too much gas then I'll see if I can switch to some all seasons which have good sipes. I've always survived well with fair all season tires anyways, its just that these Canadian Tire Nordic Winter Trac tires are a really good deal.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. DavidY

    DavidY Supporting Actor

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    Chris,

    I have had Nordic Wintertracs (215/70-14) on my 2WD pickup for the past several winters (bought them for ~$250 unmounted in early 2002). Pretty decent "severe snow" rated tires for the most part....same tread as the much pricier BF Goodrich Winter Slaloms. A bit slippery on ice. Have had to use chains once in awhile when the roads are hockey rink icy. Make sure that you get a set of four winter tires.

    I never bothered checking my fuel economy during the winter....it's lousy (truck's MPG already lousy) as the winters in the BC interior usually gets very cold....-35 to -40 deg Celsius last winter for a few weeks on and off. Remote vehicle starter comes in handy.

    Dave
     
  7. Mark Philp

    Mark Philp Second Unit

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    I always notice a drop in milage in the winter. I think it's a combination of factors. Part of it may be caused by snow tires, but here in the "Snowiest City in New York State" the safety factor of using snow tires far outweighs the extra cost of a little more gas. There a lot of places where a good set of all-season tires will do, but not when you're taking on 200" inches or more of snow each winter. I always just assumed that everyone used them in Canada because most of the time you guys get the storms before we do.
     
  8. Chris PC

    Chris PC Producer

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    I've never used snow tires. Roads are plowed reasonably well where I've driven and we get lots of salt and sand. Not happy about the salt, but it makes the roads not slippery, so I'm not saying I'm thrilled, but because of it, I haven't needed snow tires. In winter, we just drive for the conditions. I always see the doh heads driving too fast and sliding/skidding.

    I may be passing on the snow tires because I can't justify buying a second set of tires (even though they are super cheap) and also buying another set of rims. If I have a change of heart within the next few days, I'll pick them up asap, but I have to check into some things about the car itself. Safety wise.
     
  9. DavidY

    DavidY Supporting Actor

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    Chris,

    Here are some links regarding winter driving and tire technology:

    http://www.canadiandriver.com/winter.htm

    IMO, sooner or later, winter tires (sets of four per vehicle) will become mandatory across Canada....think that it's mandatory or highly recommended in Quebec if my memory serves me right.

    IMO, all season tires should be re-labelled three season tires (spring/summer/fall).

    Dave
     

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