The best method for recessing a driver? (flush mount)

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Anthony_Gomez, Mar 8, 2003.

  1. I'll be doing a little veneering (NBL) and am curious as to the best method for flushmounting.

    The two problems I am concerned with:
    1) chip out of the veneer at the cut edge
    2)"circle" indents left by imperfections on the Jasper base accentuated by multiple passes through thicker wood.

    Here are the options I can think of
    1) veneer first, and use a Fluted staight bit
    2) veneer first and use an up cut bit
    3) veneer first and use a down cut bit (rocker doesn't have them)
    4) route the inner diameter first, then veneer, then flush , then use a rabbit bit

    any opinions/advice from EXPERIENCED cabinet builders (just trying to eliminate guesses)?
     
  2. DarrellC

    DarrellC Stunt Coordinator

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    I would do the following. Rout out a hole slightly smaller than the sub's frame. Next take a rabbeting bit with a bearing at the bottom and rout out a circle to recess the sub. Make sure it is the exact diameter and thickness if the speaker. Then veneer over the opening. You can trim the veneer with a straight cutting bit with a bearing on the bottom to ride in the rabbet. That should work!
     
  3. Pete Mazz

    Pete Mazz Supporting Actor

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    I always make a full template of the baffle out of MDF and clamp it onto a finished speaker and route the driver holes with a pattern bit. Once the template is made correctly it leaves no chance of errors on a finished speaker. The templte also prevents any tearout of veneer. If any of the drivers are offset to make a left and right, just flip the template over.

    [​IMG]

    Pete
     
  4. Javier_Huerta

    Javier_Huerta Supporting Actor

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    I am curious about something... could you rout a hole using a simple Dremel tool with the routing accesory?
     
  5. Jonathan T

    Jonathan T Second Unit

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    You could, but it wouldn't be easy, a router would be much better.
     
  6. Mark Risso

    Mark Risso Auditioning

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    I used a dremel with the routing tool workes great on small holes. I used it to cut and recess the driver
     
  7. Jonathan M

    Jonathan M Second Unit

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    Just confirming Pete's method - works a charm. If you can get a patterning bit with the bearing the exact same diameter of the router bit, then it's a perfect method, as you can be certain your pattern is correct beforehand by placing the pattern over the driver.

    You can also use the same method with a template follower, but you have to allow for the extra diameter on the follower which introduces a little guess work.

    In either case, my advice is to make a template - especially if you are doing more than one hole the same size! You can test your template out on a piece of scrap MDF to make sure it is perfect. I've used both the above methods with success after veneering first.
     
  8. Chris Tsutsui

    Chris Tsutsui Screenwriter

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    I've seen Pete's method. MDF templates work well with laminates and veneers.
     
  9. Baldemar Garcia

    Baldemar Garcia Stunt Coordinator

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