Onkyo receivers - DC motors?

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by AlbertT, May 28, 2004.

  1. AlbertT

    AlbertT Auditioning

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    Hiya all,

    I bought the Onkyo HTiB HTS-760 late August last year and have been pretty happy with it. My only problem is that my work is relocating me to Sydney, Australia.

    Taking a look around, it seems that electronic goods in Aus. are generally pricier than in the US and I'm reluctant to sell off my HTiB for a loss only to buy a more expensive one there (for the same quality). So I thought of moving mine.

    Now, the only issue is that Onkyo was very specific in that my subwoofer and receiver both require 120V at 60Hz. It could very well be that they do require the 60Hz, or it could be that Onkyo just didn't want gray market sales to eat up their legitimate sales in Australia. That being said, when I was searching through Google I found a page on Yamaha's website--but since this is my first post, I can't post URLs so I'll try to describe the location here:

    Three "w" followed by yamaha dot com and then forward-slash yec forward-slash customer forward-slash faqs forward-slash general forward-slash faq20b.htm.

    The relevant part is:

    The transformer you are going to need is a 2 to 1 step-down type, converting the voltage from 220-240VAC to 110-120VAC. Do not be concerned about the frequency, as all of our products use DC motors, and are not tied to the AC line for speed regulation

    That being said, how can I tell if my Onkyo products will survive the transition to 240/50 environment?

    Thanks all!
     
  2. MikeRP

    MikeRP Supporting Actor

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    It won't............you need to get a convertor that will give you 110v @60 herz. They are out there.

    I'd be suprised if that statement above was for Yamaha receivers.

    But, frick, I don't know everything.......I could be wrong.....really.

    Mike
     
  3. AlbertT

    AlbertT Auditioning

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    Well, one thing I can use is to get a UPS ... but I'd need at least a high-end UPS I think that does the conversion. Most low to mid-range UPS simply pass through the power. AFAIK at least.
     
  4. David Strand

    David Strand Agent

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    The only thing I could imagine they would be talking about could possibly be a DC motor used to turn the volume knob when using a remote. While this was common on older receivers, they hardley ever do this any more since there really is no need for it.

    If that isn't what they are talking about, then I would guess they are not talking about HT receivers...
     
  5. Jeff Hipps

    Jeff Hipps Stunt Coordinator

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    I think their statement about "DC Motors" was actually referring to items like turntables, cassette decks and CD players. At one time the use of AC synchronous motors was common especially in turntables and cassette decks. Such motors were designed to synch to the AC line frequency. While use of a step up or step down line transformer would have them running safely on the new voltage, unless one made a pulley change, they also ran at the wrong speed. DC motors made the need to change the pulley unnecessary.

    Jeff
     
  6. AlbertT

    AlbertT Auditioning

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    Ah well. Thanks all for the responses. Looks like I'll sell off my arms and legs once I get to Australia. [​IMG]
     

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