Movin' Up 5.1 To 6.1 To 7.1 Help

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Scott Ailstock, Oct 14, 2002.

  1. Scott Ailstock

    Scott Ailstock Auditioning

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2002
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hello, I'm fairly new to the HT world. I currently have a Sony DD 5.1 reciever and Klipch Reference speakers. I like the speakers and plan to keep them. I have the RF3 fronts, RC3 center, RS3 surrounds, and a KSW12 sub . I have a chance to buy a used Denon reciever with 6.1 capabilities for a good price. I would like, in the not too distant future, to have a 7.1 receiver (That's the way things seem to be going). After all of that, here's my question :

    If I buy another pair of RS3 surrounds, can I use one of them as the rear center for 6.1 until such time as I am able to afford a 7.1 reciever and then use both of the RS3's as a pair?

    Thanks in advance for your comments.
     
  2. Jason_Els

    Jason_Els Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2001
    Messages:
    1,096
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi Scott and welcome to Home Theater Forum! [​IMG]
    This whole situation has been something of a problem. There are no 7.1 consumer formats nor have any been planned. Sony's SDDS, which is a true 7.1 format, could become a consumer format for DVD but so far they have not elected to do that nor have they announced any plans to.
    Dolby Digital EX / DTS-ES: These 6.1 formats, as far as rear channel decoding is concerned, are essentially Pro-Logic for the rear derived from the discrete signals fed to the surrounds and your bass management choices in the receiver. For example, if you have small sides but large rears the bass that was supposed to go to the surrounds will be fed to the rear instead. EX/ES material is encoded to take advantage of 6.1 systems so that the rear provide some directionality. They all use 6 discrete channels, 1 center, 2 front sides, 2 surrounds, and 1 LFE channel. All EX and ES capable receivers and surround processors can create a 6.1 matrix from non-EX/ES material. Sometimes it works well, other times it doesn't. It's a matter of what is pleasing to you.
    DTS NEO:6 : This takes any 2-channel (stereo) source and creates a 5 or 6 channel surround format.
    The 7.1 idea is actually using 2 speakers in the rear instead of just one. Both speakers receive identical signals whether it's EX, ES, or Neo6. Using two rear speakers is something some people like, others prefer just one. It's a matter of taste, budget, and home theater size.
    This is not to say that down the line 7.1 won't become a standard, just that so far none of the companies involved in it have said anything and, perhaps more importantly, there are no rumors of such. Who knows what the future may hold though? Some day perhaps an overhead omni-directional will become a standard as may a separate channel for motion inducers.
    See these links for more information:
    DTS Frequently Asked Questions
    Dolby Labs Frequently Asked Questions
    Hope this helps!
     
  3. Stephen Hopkins

    Stephen Hopkins HW Reviewer
    HW Reviewer

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2002
    Messages:
    2,598
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Everything Jason said is right on the mark. However, several newer receivers offer the option for a 7.1 speaker setup, even though both rear speakers are outputting the same information. Depending on room size and setup, this can make for a more diffuse rear sound stage with less directionality.

    I, personally, prefer a 7.1 setup to a 6.1 setup. Others will say that for 6.1 material, you should only do 6.1. There are also the die hards that'll say 5.1 is all you'll ever need. Alot of this is personal preference. Try some things out and see what you like.

    Concerning your question directly, you could pick up another pair and use only 1 in a 6.1 setup until you get a receiver w/ 7.1 speaker setup capabilities. You could also wire both speakers IN SERIES to the single back channel output for a 7.1 setup.

    What Denon are you buying used? If it's a 1803, 3801, or 3802, it will have speaker outputs for either 1 or 2 back speakers. If it's a 2802 it will only have 2 output, so you would either have stick w/ 6.1, or wire both speakers in series. Either would work just fine, so it's best to play around and see what you like best.
     
  4. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    4,791
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yes, if you wire the two in series, you are essentially accomplishing the same thing as a "7.1" setup. Sony's SDDS has the estra two speakers in the front, for 5 across the front, 2 surrounds. Also to clarify DTS ES, which i do frequently, dts ed discrete IS a true 6.1 format, and the center back is not decoded in the prologic style. The matrix version is matrixed (duh! [​IMG]). Anywho, i do beleive that there are SOME receivers where the "7.1" feature actually sends a slightly different signal to the surround backs, but this is not a standard, and the difference is probably unnoticable. I think i heard onkyo does it in some, but i dunno. I might be wrong about that.
     
  5. Scott Ailstock

    Scott Ailstock Auditioning

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2002
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for all of your replies. Great info. I wasn't sure if the angles of the horn tweeters on the RS3 surround would diffuse the sound of the rear center TOO much and defeat it's purpose. I think I will buy the pair of RS3's and wire them in series instead of buying another RC3. In my twisted little mind, the idea of more speakers has got to be better, now, and for the possible future. I guess I thought when 7.1 does come about, the right rear and right surround would be playing the same thing, and the left rear and left surround would play the same thing but have separate signals from the right. Speaker problem solved for now. NEXT . . . Must have BIGGER TV! (Remember, size does matter!)
     

Share This Page