I line double...Do I need progressive dvd player?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Doug_H, May 24, 2002.

  1. Doug_H

    Doug_H Supporting Actor

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    I have a friend with a new Toshiba 65" wide. The set line doubles all ports and the picture is very good considering he hasn't had it calibrated yet. Would he see any benefit from a progessive scan DVD player? Why?
     
  2. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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    This issue comes up a lot. Here are some earlier threads:
    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...ht=progressive
    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...ht=progressive
    FWIW, I have a 65" Toshiba widescreen that's three years old. I see a very significant improvement with a p/s player. Assuming your friend has a more recent model, the set's line doubling circuitry would undoubtedly be an improvement over my set's, but I would still expect a good p/s player to do a better job. It's hard to beat the advantages of doing the 480p processing entirely in the digital domain.
    M.
     
  3. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    There will be a slight amount of improvement with film source DVD's using a progressive scan DVD player compared with relying on the doubler in the TV or a doubler that stands alone. Some folks say they can't tell, others say it is noticeable. Whether or not you see any difference watching movies, you might at least be interested in borrowing a prog-scan player and playing the AVIA 200 TVL resolution chart. Observe the upright wedges, or horizontal resolution patterns. (Video Essentials' chart doesn't go high enough to conduct this test.)
    For non-film DVD's it is hard to say. A few progressive DVD players don't handle non-film sources (or film source DVD's not properly encoded) as well as some stand alone doublers or some progressive scan TV sets.
    Generally if the DVD player or the TV offers a choice of doubling strategies such as smart, video 1, auto, etc. the doubler is only middling when it comes to non-film sources. The best (and also the worst) doublers don't offer any such choice.
    More:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/viddoubl.htm
     
  4. Andrew_Ballew

    Andrew_Ballew Second Unit

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    It all depends on how good the de-interlacer in the set is. On many TV's the difference is un-noticable. On others, it is very pronounced. On my HDTV, a non-Elite Pioneer set, the internal de-interlacer is hideous, and furthermore does not recognize 3-2 pulldown. All progressive scan players I have tried with it have been an improvement in both Film and video mode.

    Andrew B.
     
  5. Michael Lomker

    Michael Lomker Stunt Coordinator

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    Like the others said, it isn't an easy call. It is basically the same technology, but one is in your set and the other is in the DVD player. Whichever component has the better electronics is going to give the best picture.

    I elected to buy a high-end television and non-progressive DVD player. A lot of the high-end DVD players don't even do progressive; they expect you to have an external doubler.
     

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