Denon 1802/1803 Crossover Question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Christopher E, Aug 18, 2002.

  1. Christopher E

    Christopher E Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi all, quite a forum you have here! I can't tell you how many things i have learned from lurking here! Anyways I am thinking about getting a Denon 1803 when its avalible later in the year. The only problem is that the sub crossover only goes down to 80hz.

    My speaker setup so far:

    Mains: Energy xl:25's (going to get soon)
    Center: Energy xl:c
    Surrounds: Energy xl:16's (using as mains right now)
    Subwoofer: Energy S8.2

    My question is won't the 80hz crossover be too high for my speakers (the 25's go down to 43hz, 16's to 50hz, and xl:c to 60hz)? Is there any way to let the xl:25's crossover lower so they can be used to their full potential? If not should I just get another pair of xl:16's to use for mains since I won't be using the lower frequency bass on the 25's anyways?
     
  2. Selden Ball

    Selden Ball Second Unit

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    Christopher,

    If anything, 80Hz may be a little low for your speakers.

    Crossover filters aren't "brick walls". Although typically they have a slope of about 12 or 24dB per octave, that still lets through an appreciable amount of sound -- some low frequencies still go to the main speakers, while some frequencies above the crossover get to the subwoofer. Typically the designers expect the speakers to be linear to about an octave (half the crossover frequency) below the crossover frequency so that their sound will blend properly with that coming out of the subwoofer, which should be linear to about an octave (twice the crossover frequency) above the crossover frequency.

    Also, bear in mind that the frequencies that are redirected to the powered subwoofer are sounds which the receiver does not have to supply power for. As a result, it can deliver higher power levels to the speaker channels that it is driving. This reduces the chance of it clipping at high sound levels and potentially damaging the tweeters.

    I hope this clarifies things a little.
     
  3. Christopher E

    Christopher E Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks your post was very helpful. I already learned some stuff about crossovers rolling off but I thought that since the speakers wouldn't be doing much at the bottom of the octave I could get away with the 16s as mains.

    I'd rather not put the crossover at 100hz (the denon can do 80/100/120) because my sub would be too easy to locate in the room. Also, I've decided to get the xl:25's for mains since they can go lower giving me a smoother crossover and they are more sensetive than the xl:16's (the 16's are bookshelfs).

    One last question maybe someone can answer: What is the slope on the crossover filter of the denon 1802/1803 (I assume it is the same on both models)? I checked the manual on denon's site but i haven't found any mention of it.
     
  4. Matt Hester

    Matt Hester Auditioning

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    Finding a receiver with bass management to crossover below 80 will be difficult. There is LFE information that you will be cutting out by crossing over too low, hence a hole in your sound. If we are talking a mostly music system try using a tape out as a sub out. No crossover on a tape out, you can use the crossover built in to your sub.
     

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