connect w/ component video jacks or regular input?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Ryan Taylor, Nov 1, 2001.

  1. Ryan Taylor

    Ryan Taylor Auditioning

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    I'm connecting my dvd player to my new Denon reciever and I'm not sure what's the best way to hook it up. Should I use the component video jacks or just the regular input and output jacks. Also what's the difference? Thanks.
     
  2. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    the component cables usually come into play when you're running a progressive dvd to a hdtv. if that's not the case, you're okay with using the composite instead.
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    "The ship of death has a new captain." - nosferatu (1922)
     
  3. Jake T

    Jake T Stunt Coordinator

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    I agree with Ted, but, you should check if you can use your s-vid i/o. It will provide a better picture than composite.
    [​IMG]
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    Jake T
    --"The Things You Do In Life Echo In Eternity"
     
  4. Mark Rich

    Mark Rich Second Unit

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    It all depends on your monitor. If it takes component input use it. You will notice a big improvement over composite and a smaller improvement over a good s-vhs cable. I find the best method is to use component cables run direct from the DVD player to your monitor ( switch at the monitor ) and run the other sources using S-VHS through the A/V controller. You do not need to spend a fortune on component cables either. Try one of these on-line cable makers
    Rhinocables.com
    Wickedcables.com
    KustomKables.com
     
  5. Guy Kuo

    Guy Kuo Supporting Actor

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    In descending order of preference and image quality use the following connections for DVD players
    1. Component video - this keeps the luma and two color difference signals separated and at full bandwidth. Compared to S-video this maintains greater color resolution.
    2. S-video - this keeps the luma separate from the color but has to combine the two color signals (along with bandwidth limiting them) into one chroma signal. The display must reseparate the two color difference signals. Compared to composite, this connection avoids loss of luma resolution during separation of color and luma from the combined composite signal.
    3. Composite video - combines all three signals into a single "composite" signal. This requires the most work by the TV to reconstruct the original signals. The reconstruction process is imperfect even on very advanced displays. Avoid this type of connection if you can.
    There is also progressive component on some players, that is fodder for another discussion.
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    Guy Kuo
    www.ovationsw.com
    Ovation Software, the Home of AVIA DVD
     
  6. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    so, is component preferred even if you're running non-progressive dvd to a "regular" tv?
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    "The ship of death has a new captain." - nosferatu (1922)
     
  7. Guy Kuo

    Guy Kuo Supporting Actor

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    Yes, provided of course, the TV has component video inputs. Using component maintains the highest luma and chroma bandwidth.
     
  8. Ryan Taylor

    Ryan Taylor Auditioning

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    Thanks for all the quick info. I just realized how stinking stupid I am about all of this stuff.
     
  9. Kevin Coleman

    Kevin Coleman Second Unit

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    Guy,
    Don't forget RGBHV. It should be just above component.
    Kevin C. [​IMG]
     
  10. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    hey ryan -
    don't even feel that way. that's what it's all about. i've been into this for about 15 years and i'm still learning. just see what guy told me about cables. i didn't realize that myself!
    if you get into it you'll soon realize there's so much to learn, so many nuances that you'll always wonder what else is out there.
    remember, there are plenty of folks who make a career from this stuff! [​IMG]
    anway, that's what we're all here for. another suggestion: if you get into this hobby is to pick up a couple a/v journals (soundandvision is a good one to learn the basics) - you'll learn a lot just by reading the reviews and "how-to" articles.
    [​IMG]
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    "The ship of death has a new captain." - nosferatu (1922)
     
  11. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Home Theater magazine compared all 3 different connections using a DVD player and a "reference" 50" RPTV (standard, not HD). Here were the numbers they came up with:
    Composite connection - baseline
    SVideo - 20% better than Composite
    Component - 25% better than Composite
    The also noted that for a display larger than 50", the difference was greater. And for a display less than 50", the difference was less.
    Some advice: Your receiver WILL NOT convert one signal type to another. If you send Component to the Dennon, you need to run Component cables from the Dennon to the TV.
    To run your VCR through the Dennon, you have to run a Composite cable to the Dennon, and a composite cable from the Dennon to the TV.
    So there is NO advantage to going through the Dennon unless you have 2 or more Component devices.
    Here is what I do: Run Composite video from EVERY device to the Dennon. Run 1 composite video cable from the Dennon to the TV.
    Now the whole system can be run leaving the TV looking that the composite-video feed from the Dennon. All the audio/video switching is done with the Dennon remote. This makes the system easy to use for the wife and kids.
    Also: run a component-video cable set straight from the DVD player to the tv. When you sit down to watch a DVD, you do the extra step of grabbing the TV remote and switching inputs to see the better video.
    You can also use this to demonstrate the difference in video quality between Composite and Component. Just toggle the TV input between the two and the difference should be obvious.
    Hope this helps.
     
  12. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    RGB and Y,Pb,Pr component video are equals as far as theoretical quality is concerned, but component video has lower (half) color resolution (Pb,Pr lines) according to DVD and ATSC HDTV standards. Video from DVD begins as component. The only reason to convert DVD component video to RGB (color resolution does not improve in the process) is if the TV has RGB input but no component input. This requires additional circuitry which may or may not (almost always not) be built into the DVD player.
    Other video hints: http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
    [Edited last by Allan Jayne on November 01, 2001 at 10:04 PM]
     

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