Broadcasters Require inserting toothpick between eyelids before providing signal.

Discussion in 'TV Shows' started by Mary M S, Apr 25, 2006.

  1. Mary M S

    Mary M S Screenwriter

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    Not sure if this belongs in hardware (since it concerns end content we see) or AHL or perhaps in a new area titled "Give me a break!"

    very disturbing

    “Yes, said Royal Philips Electronics. A patent application with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office said researchers of the Netherlands-based consumer electronics company has created a technology that could let broadcasters freeze up a channel during a commercial, so viewers would not be able to avoid it
    .
    The pending patent, published March 30, said the feature would be implemented on a program-by-program basis. Devices that could carry the technology would be a television or a set-top-box. “

    Evidently the notice of the patent filing created some bad PR, so Philips made a comment later in the week, pointing out the technology could be applied in reverse with viewers having to PAY for the privilege of not seeing advertising, if they want their remote ‘unfrozen’ so that they can resume their habitualized channel surfing.
     
  2. Jason Seaver

    Jason Seaver Lead Actor

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    Nice patent to have, but what incentive is there for a hardware manufacturer have to include this functionality? It's not something the consumer wants, and Sony (say) would have to pay Philips for the privelege.
     
  3. MatthewLouwrens

    MatthewLouwrens Producer

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    I do love the concept of resolving bad PR by pointing out the posiive advantages of the technology - like, um, paying money to be able to do what we can already do for free.
     
  4. Arild

    Arild Supporting Actor

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    That technology is just begging to be abused. How long before broadcasters (perhaps "accidentally") use it to keep viewers from changing the channel between shows? Or maybe even at all?

    Although, I'm thinking we won't be seeing the technology be put to use at all anytime soon.
     

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