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Direct Views can't do 720p?


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7 replies to this topic

#1 of 8 OFFLINE   Frank@N

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Posted May 05 2003 - 09:38 AM

Was talking to a HT sales guy who commented that 'direct views (CRT) can't do 720p, they'd burn up" True or false?

#2 of 8 OFFLINE   Stephen Tu

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Posted May 05 2003 - 12:17 PM

"Burn up"??? LOL. Of course CRT is capable of being designed to display 720p; it's no different from all the CRT computer monitors that can do that plus even higher resolution + higher refresh rate. There have been a few CRT direct-views produced that could do 720p. What is true is that nearly all direct-view HDTVs available won't do it; it's cheaper not to support 720p display. Many will accept 720p as input, converting to 1080i for display.

#3 of 8 OFFLINE   David Lorenzo

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Posted May 05 2003 - 01:25 PM

It's true that direct view consumer sets, save computer monitors and monovision sets, can't do 720p natively. I have no idea what he was talking about when he said they would "burn up" though.

#4 of 8 OFFLINE   Allan Jayne

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Posted May 05 2003 - 03:20 PM

720p is more scan lines per second than 1080i. Some TV electronics (I don't know which and don't know how to predict which) will be damaged by feeding in a scan rate other than what they normally accept.

The very first IBM PC had in its manual a cautionary notice about this in reference to choosing and connecting a monitor.

Although almost all computer monitors handle 600p (for 800x600) and 768p (for 1024x768 non-interlaced) many do not accept 720p.

Video hints:
http://members.aol.c...ynejr/video.htm
.

#5 of 8 OFFLINE   John Royster

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Posted May 06 2003 - 01:38 AM

I remember some direct view models that did 720p laster year? Wasn't there a panasonic that did?

#6 of 8 OFFLINE   Daniel Becker

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Posted May 06 2003 - 07:53 AM

The Sony 32" HS500 accepts a 720p signal. I know because I just bought one. Posted Image




Dan.B

#7 of 8 OFFLINE   Ken Chan

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Posted May 06 2003 - 10:30 AM

Accepting 720p and displaying it as such without scaling are two separate things.

[quote] Although almost all computer monitors handle 600p (for 800x600) and 768p (for 1024x768 non-interlaced) many do not accept 720p. [quote] Most monitors are multiscan. 720p is between 600p and 768p, so the frequency should be in range. Why wouldn't it work, especially if the picture is 4:3? Of course, most video cards don't support that resolution, but that's a separate issue.

//Ken

#8 of 8 OFFLINE   David Lorenzo

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Posted May 06 2003 - 03:17 PM

Any modern computer monitor should be able to handle 720p with ease. I have a 4 year old Philips 19" monitor and it can do 1920x1080p with no problem. Not that I ever use it, but it shows you just how "modern" HDTV direct view technology is right now.




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