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New DVD releases of the Flintstone spinoff shows & specials and new BLU-RAY releases of the Flintsto

Discussion in 'TV on DVD and Blu-ray' started by happyfa5, Sep 16, 2010.

  1. happyfa5

    happyfa5 Member

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    We all know that THE FLINTSTONES is still tops in the cartoon world today since 1960. It has made Hanna-Barbera a household name even after the sucess of Tom and Jerry, the Huckleberry Hound show, Yogi Bear and the Quick Draw McGraw show. We want Fred and the gang to be big with the pubic again with new remasted and restored DVD releases of the Flintstone Kids (1986 series), A Flintstone Christmas (TV special), Wind-up Wilma (TV special), The Flintstones: Little Big League (TV special), the Flintstone Comedy hour (1972 series), The Flintstones meet Rockula and Frankenstone (TV special), Jogging Fever (TV special), the Flintstone Comedy show (1980 series), Fred's Final Fling (TV special), The Flintstones' New Neighbors (TV special) and A Flintstone Family Christmas (TV special). Plus also possible BLU-RAY releases of the Flintstone television movies, I Yabba-Dabba Do!, On the Rocks and Hollyrock-a-Bye Baby. So what do you fellas think?
     
  2. Joe*A

    Joe*A Well-Known Member

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    I'm a huge fan of the Flintstones but I'm hesitant in buying anything from Hanna Barbera related to the Flintstones after the 1960s iconic television show. Everything after that is not very good. I picked up on DVD the Pebbles and Bamm Bamm Show (1971-1972) and despite the voice of Sally Struthers as Pebbles [better known as Gloria from All in the Family], the show was terrible. Maybe future reinicarnations of the show that focused more on Fred and Barney did get better (but for the life of me, I just can't remember any fond memories of those latter shows).

     

    Sorry buddy....just my humble opinion.
     
  3. Randy Korstick

    Randy Korstick Well-Known Member

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    Actually Joe while I agree The Pebbles and Bam-Bam show is not that great it is worlds better than the Flintstone shows that came after it. For fans of the Original 60's Flinstones Pebbles and Bam Bam is where the Flinstones ends as Hanna-Barbera like most of Saturday morning shows started jumping the shark in the mid-70's and did by the late 70's. The Latter Flinstones shows were just as bad as the latter Jetsons of the late 70's and early 80's.
     
  4. Mark-P

    Mark-P Well-Known Member

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    The difference between the original Flinstones from 1960 and all the other incarnations, is that the orginal show was a prime-time series for adults as well as children and all the rest of what came after was Saturday morning fodder that is mainly for the kiddies.
     
  5. LeoA

    LeoA Well-Known Member

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    There was some decent stuff afterwards.

     

    I especially liked the Christmas special where Santa breaks his leg and Fred and Barney take their place. I think that was of as high of quality as the original tv run and movie finale were.
     
  6. Guest

    I'd like to have the original series on blu-ray.
     
  7. Joe*A

    Joe*A Well-Known Member

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    Mark-P, you are so right. The other big difference is Alan Reed, the original voice of Fred; the new guy (can't remember his name at this moment) didn't have the right pitch to be Fred. Oh well.
     
  8. ThatDonGuy

    ThatDonGuy Well-Known Member

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    Weren't The Flintstones: Little Big League and Jogging Fever (isn't this the one where Fred keeps saying, "Jog, Jog, Jiggety Jog") part of the Flintstone Comedy Hour?

     

    One problem with the early NBC shows; nobody was interested in a 12-year-old Pebbles (which is why they went back to P&BB as infants).

     

    -- Don
     
  9. Mark Collins

    Mark Collins Well-Known Member

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    Did you guys know they are airing on boomarang cartoon network at 7:00 PM EST on Saturdays and Sundays one half our of skits from the comedy hour. I love them because it is Alan Reed as Fred. I never got into the other voice. Alan Reed's voice could not be replaced. I remember in the credits from the old show. Starring the Voice of Alan Reed as Fred Flintstone and then the rest of the actor voice's followed. The specials mentioned were aired in prime time and also show up on Boomarang from time to time.
     
  10. Rob W

    Rob W Well-Known Member

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    This Thursday ( Sept 20 ) at 8:30 is the 50th anniversary of the airing of the very first episode ( The Flintstone Flyer ).
     
  11. Mark Collins

    Mark Collins Well-Known Member

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    Rob thankyou for that reminder. I wonder why this historic event in Prime Time is not being celebrated. Milestone for sure is written all over the Flintsones. The show was a huge hit and I watched with my Grandpa when the show went to syndication right after it ended. I remember too that was the time Congress mandated Networks return 1 hour of time back to staitons for family viewing. WB why are you not marketing this big event????
     
  12. Corey3rd

    Corey3rd Well-Known Member

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    Boomerang would be he place to celebrate it since they run the Flintstones. But they don't seem interested in reminding us how old their cartoons are.
     
  13. Regulus

    Regulus Well-Known Member

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  14. Mark Collins

    Mark Collins Well-Known Member

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    I doubt the series will ever be in blu-ray. I play them in my blu-ray machine and they look great. I wish they had packaged up the last Alan Reed skits from the comedy hour and any extras they could find. The Pebbles and Bam Bam release had 3 episodes in the comedy hour which they included in the P&B release which I did not buy. My point is they already took material from the 1972 show why not package up the rest and release it under 50 years of Flintsone's. I guess in these times it is to much to expect.
     
  15. Regulus

    Regulus Well-Known Member

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    Researching what was on TV on 9/30/1960. I found out I have DVDs of Four of the TV Episodes on this date, including the very first Episode of The Flintstones. Therefore, next Thursday I will re-create that evening 50 years ago, when The Flintstones made its Debut, along with the other Shows that aired on this date. BTW This will not be the only Show making its 50th Anniversary Debut this year. On the following Thursday, (October 7) Route 66 will have its Anniversary as well.
     
  16. Mark Collins

    Mark Collins Well-Known Member

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    I found out there were 16 episodes of the Comedy hour. The last episodes to feature Alan Reed as Fred. Boomerang airs these episodes Saturday and Sunday 7:PM EST.


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    The modern Stone Age family has its golden anniversary

    'The Flintstones' broke ground as the first animated prime-time show. Fifty years on, it's a cultural touchstone.







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    This month marks the 50th anniversary of "The Flintstones." (Hanna Barbera Productions / Warner Bros / December 11, 2009)










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    By Stephen Cox, Special to the Los Angeles Times

    September 11, 2010



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    It was 50 years ago this month, on the evening of Sept. 30, 1960, that America met the Flintstones, television's modern Stone Age family. That Friday night, kids couldn't wait. Parents were curious. And the ABC network executives pondered their gamble patiently. TV's first animated prime-time sitcom made history; well, they were history.


    "I remember sitting and watching the premiere episode," says actor Paul Reubens, who later starred in his own popular children's show, "Pee-wee's Playhouse." "I think I was in fourth or fifth grade at the time. Just the whole idea of a cartoon in prime time was exciting and there was a lot of hype about it. I loved how they patterned some characters after real stars like Ann Margrock and Stoney Curtis."


    Set in the animated suburbia of Bedrock, Fred and Wilma Flintstone (voiced by radio veterans Alan Reed and Jean Vander Pyl) along with their genial neighbors Betty and Barney Rubble (Bea Benaderet and Mel Blanc), were meant as an amalgam of adult satire and children's amusement.


    "The Flintstones" was drawn to be a slice-of-life sitcom with a prehistoric twist. The show boasted several milestones: Quite possibly, Fred and Wilma Flintstone were the first sitcom couple to be shown sleeping on the same king-size, er, slab. And definitely a cartoon first. And until 1997 when "The Simpsons" surpassed their prehistoric predecessor, "The Flintstones" held the record as the longest-running prime time animated series.


    Get breaking entertainment news, delivered to your mobile phone. Text ENTERTAIN to 52669.





    John Stephenson, 87, who carries an undeniably familiar Hanna Barbera intonation in his speaking voice, is one of the last surviving cast members of the iconic show. Most notably, Stephenson portrayed Fred's bombastic boss at the rock quarry, Mr. Slate, among multitudes of Bedrock citizenry throughout the program's original six-year run.


    "I think the show was successful because it was an adult cartoon and viewers associated it with 'The Honeymooners,' " he says. "And with the Stone Age setting and some very good writing, audiences loved it. They still do."


    Created by animation legends William Hanna and Joseph Barbera, "The Flintstones" (titled "The Flagstones" in early development) became the flagship property for the cartoon factory the duo created for television production. After producing an Academy Award-winning slew of Tom and Jerry cartoons at MGM, Hanna and Barbera formed their own company and created such animated characters as Emmy winner Huckleberry Hound, Quick Draw McGraw and Ruff and Reddy. This time, however, they audaciously decided to redirect their efforts, wipe the slate clean, and twist their usual format: Their new TV series would extend the animation to a half hour and gamble on prime-time audiences. That was unheard of in 1960.


    In the process, Hanna-Barbera reinvented the animation business, introducing a more efficient and economically feasible "limited animation" procedure that proved popular both with the network and with audiences. While many animation studios were closing in Hollywood, Hanna and Barbera were just opening their doors and enticing a pool of veterans to join them in their plunge. Some of animation's greatest talents helped polish these precious 'stones.' With caveman characters designed by artist Ed Benedict and a talented team of animators, the unique cartoon took off, and fast. "The Flintstones" ignited a following with loyal audiences young and old, setting off a groundbreaking cascade that eventually paved the way for more prime-time favorites such as "The Jetsons," "Top Cat," and such current mega-hits as "The Simpsons" and "Family Guy."


    Stephenson credits Barbera's talent for directing the cast as a key to the show's charm, at least vocally. During those smoke-filled studio recording sessions (the show was sponsored by Winston cigarettes for a while), it was not uncommon to hear Barbera barking over the speaker, "I paid a lot of money for this script, so I want to hear the lines!"


    The verbal gymnastics were always bold and lively. "Very seldom did he want anyone to talk in a moderate tone or conversational tone," Stephenson explains. "He wanted it up there, right in your face, punctuated, laid out and hit!"


    Over decades, "The Flintstones" spawned many reincarnations, including several new series attempts (even a proposed series titled "The Blackstones") and in the 1990s Fred and Wilma became movie stars with a pair of live-action feature films for Universal Studios.


    One spinoff in 1979 was a short-lived segment of "The New Fred and Barney Show" on NBC called "The Frankenstones," which mixed "The Flintstones" talent with a touch of "The Munsters." Paul Reubens, just getting started in his television career, provided a voice on the show.


    "I'm a big fan of 'The Flintstones,' so when I worked on 'The Frankenstones,' it was really exciting," he recalls. "The whole idea of going to a recording studio with Fred and Wilma Flintstone was unbelievable and a little intimidating. I worked with Mel Blanc and that was unforgettable. The first time I went in there, it was so amazing to hear those famous voices come out of real people's mouths; and these grown people were taking their work so seriously. It amazed me and I couldn't' wait to go to work."


    The classic series, for now, is at home on Cartoon Network's Boomerang channel and it continues to be a viable worldwide franchise for Warner Bros. Animation, the characters' current owner. Just look on any grocer's store shelves and you'll see "yabba-dabba-delicious" Fruity Pebbles cereal and other sugary flavors plus colorful Flintstones vitamins within reach for all the kiddies.


    Marking the show's golden anniversary, Boomerang will air the first episode of "The Flintstones" on Sept. 30 at 8:30 p.m., 50 years exactly to the date and hour of its premiere. A 24-hour marathon of classic episodes will air on Boomerang beginning Oct. 2 at 6 a.m.


    Arguably, "The Flintstones" was the best thing created by cartoon moguls Hanna and Barbera. The show may be five decades older, but fans of classic TV will attest: It's still a gem.


    calendar@latimes.com

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