1. Guest,
    If you need help getting to know Xenforo, please see our guide here. If you have feedback or questions, please post those here.
    Dismiss Notice

How can I tell if I blew a tweeter

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by JoeyR, May 17, 2005.

  1. JoeyR

    JoeyR Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2003
    Messages:
    422
    Likes Received:
    0
    Real Name:
    Joey
    I was programming my 1014 remote, I know this sounds crazy but I heard a loud pop, couldnt tell if something hit the side of my house or if it came from my right side surround, any suggestions?
     
  2. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 1999
    Messages:
    11,572
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    NorCal
    Real Name:
    John
    If you don't hear anything coming out of it, its blown.
     
  3. JoeyR

    JoeyR Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2003
    Messages:
    422
    Likes Received:
    0
    Real Name:
    Joey
    John I cant really tell if anything is coming out of any of the tweeters over the sound coming out the woofers.
     
  4. Mark--M

    Mark--M Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    0


    Thats not exactly true. If you dont hear anything from the tweeter you have a problem, doesnt necasarily mean its blown. Could be a wire popped off the back or a problem in the crossover.

    Put your ear directly in front of the tweeter while at a low volume and you should defenatly hear it. If not, pull the tweeter from the speaker and connect it directly to the reciever (dont crank it) and see if theres any sound. If theres still no sound then its toast, if there is theres a problem somewhere else in the speaker.
     
  5. Dick Boneske

    Dick Boneske Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2004
    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    0
    DON'T connect the tweeter to a receiver directly, even at low volume!! The foolproof way to check any speaker is to us a 1.5 volt battery (D, C, or AA) size. Get two wires about three feet long with alligator clips to attach to the speaker terminals. Momentarily touch the other end of the leads to the battery + and - terminals while you listen for a "pop" or "click" from the speaker. You can also clip the leads to the speaker cabinet terminals while listening to each driver in turn to see that it produces sound.

    This method is also useful to confirm that all drivers are in phase. At the moment the battery is connected, the cone will move in or out, depending on polarity. Be sure that woofer, midrange, and tweeter all move the same direction. Some tweeters are difficult or impossible to determine phase this way, but most can be seen to move.

    White noise, the hiss between FM stations, is also useful in determining if all drivers are working. It contains frequencies from the very low bass to extremely high treble. Most receivers allow disabling the muting function so you can do this.

    Good Luck!!
     
  6. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2001
    Messages:
    7,270
    Likes Received:
    1
    Usually they'll be having a cigarette and a smile on their face [​IMG]
     
  7. Mark--M

    Mark--M Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    0


    Either method will work fine without damage. To be honest the tweeter will likely see more current with the AA battery then a reciever at a low level.
     
  8. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 1999
    Messages:
    11,572
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    NorCal
    Real Name:
    John
    Put your hand over the tweeter with your ear near it (at a low level, as Mark suggests), then remove your hand. If you cannot hear a difference, the tweeter isn't functioning. It is highly unlikely that a wire popped off inside, though the x-over could be damaged. I've never had that happen in home gear (wire popping off), though it is more common in car audio. Frying tweeters does not always involve a "pop", so you may not hear the moment that the tweeter or x-over fails, it just won't be playing any longer.

    If the speaker sounds "normal" compared to the other side when you play something familiar, I wouldn't worry about it at all.
     
  9. BillyHC

    BillyHC Agent

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0

    you could probably try receiver test tones at a very low volume also.

    anyway, tweeters hit the side of my house all the time. and they like hopping around on my roof.
     
  10. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2000
    Messages:
    1,998
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    Real Name:
    Greg
    Why all the fancy solutions? Just twist the balance knob on your receiver (or disconnect the other channel). Play a sine sweep and you'll know...
     
  11. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 1999
    Messages:
    11,572
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    NorCal
    Real Name:
    John
    Got a sine sweep handy?
     
  12. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2001
    Messages:
    7,270
    Likes Received:
    1
  13. trey-m

    trey-m Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2005
    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just play some '80s music. There won't be much bass. If you can't hear the difference between the two speakers, you're fine.
     
  14. Dan Lindley

    Dan Lindley Second Unit

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2000
    Messages:
    396
    Likes Received:
    0
    I once 'blew' my tweeters, but it was only a fuse. Make sure you check your speakers' fuses. Big relief if that's the trick!

    Dan
     
  15. JoeyR

    JoeyR Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2003
    Messages:
    422
    Likes Received:
    0
    Real Name:
    Joey
    Thanks for all the help havent had time to check it out, Im partially deaf in my right ear so I guess its no big deal, its just the principle of a messed up speaker in my system.[​IMG]
     
  16. brentl

    brentl Screenwriter

    Joined:
    May 7, 1999
    Messages:
    2,922
    Likes Received:
    1
    Most speakers don't use fuses anymore.

    Brent
     
  17. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 1999
    Messages:
    11,572
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    NorCal
    Real Name:
    John
    I haven't seen a speaker that had an actual fuse in it since the 70s, maybe early 80s. There are self-resetting fused crossovers, but generally these sort of components are something you don't really want in your x-over circuitry.
     
  18. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2001
    Messages:
    7,270
    Likes Received:
    1
    But not such a bad idea to put one inline if you've got kids that just might want to play with dad's system while he's away.
     
  19. Alan Pummill

    Alan Pummill Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 1999
    Messages:
    1,264
    Likes Received:
    1
    Some Magnepan speakers have fuses.
     
  20. John Kotches

    John Kotches Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2000
    Messages:
    2,636
    Likes Received:
    0
    Alternatively, one could use a disc with something like a treble decade and use that to test to see if the tweeter has failed.

    Connect directly to the tweeter at low volume and see what the output is.

    If nothing, you've lost the tweeter.

    Cheers,
     

Share This Page