DVD Review HTF REVIEW: Looney Tunes - Golden Collection Volume Two (HIGHLY RECOMMENDED).

Discussion in 'DVD' started by Herb Kane, Nov 3, 2004.

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  1. Herb Kane

    Herb Kane Screenwriter

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    [​IMG]




    Looney Tunes – Golden Collection
    Volume Two





    Studio: Warner Brothers
    Year: Various
    Rated: Not Rated
    Film Length: 320 Minutes
    Aspect Ratio: 1.33 Standard
    Audio: DD Monaural
    Color/B&W: Color & B&W
    Languages: English, French & Spanish
    Subtitles: English, French & Spanish
    MSRP: $64.92
    Package: 4 Disc set in a 5 panel Digipak with slipcover case.





    The Feature:
    As I sit here and type this, I can’t help but be reminded of my review of last year’s original volume and wondering; “will there be another one?” Well, thanks to remarkable sales of the original set, here we are a year later with Volume Two and I can tell you up front, it has been worth the wait! This time around, WB has increased the amount of shorts from 56 (on the original Golden Collection), to 60 on Volume Two all of which have been fully restored and completely uncut.

    Warner Brothers released its first animated short in 1930. Since that time, there have been more than a thousand animated shorts created that have garnered six Academy Awards and numerous Academy Award nominations. Initially, they were used to promote music from the huge library of the Vitaphone Corporation. Starting in 1943 to 1945, WB produced “Private Snafu” (which stands for Situation Normal All Fouled Up) cartoons for the U.S. Army. As part of the Army-Navy Screen Magazine, this was a film series shown at military bases around the world. These were generally messages to military servicemen pertaining to military survival. And to a greater extent, the characters were used during the war effort in an attempt to boost morale.

    Many of the regular classic shorts that were used to boost the war effort, (Bugs Bunny Nips the Nips and Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs for example) would be now seen as racist or offensive and may never (unfortunately, for the sake of history) see the light of day as a mainstream release. Let’s hope that WB eventually releases a set similar to the Disney Front Lines set complete with the WWII propaganda cartoons. Regardless of the message being delivered, there was one quality the cartoon always had to possess; that was humor, according to long time producer Leon Schlesinger.

    Okay, on with the set.


    Disc One:

    1. The Big Snooze (1946) **
    Directed by Bob Clampett – LT

    2. Broomstick Bunny (1956) **/AA
    Directed by Chuck Jones - LT

    3. Bugs Bunny Rides Again (1948) **
    Directed by I. Freleng - MM

    4. Bunny Hugged (1951) AA
    Directed by Chuck Jones - MM

    5. French Rarebit (1951)
    Directed by Robt. McKimson - MM

    6. Gorilla My Dreams (1948) **
    Directed by Robt. McKimson - LT

    7. Hare-Brained Hypnotist (1942)
    Directed by I. Freleng - MM

    8. Hare Conditioned (1945)
    Directed by Chuck Jones - LT

    9. The Heckling Hare (1941) **/BtT
    Directed by Tex Avery - MM

    10. Little Red Riding Rabbit (1944)
    Directed by I. Freleng - MM

    11. Tortoise Beats Hare (1941) **/**
    Directed by Tex Avery - MM

    12. Rabbit Transit (1947)
    Directed by I. Freleng - MM

    13. Slick Hare (1947) **
    Directed by I. Freleng - MM

    14. Baby Buggy Bunny (1954) BtT
    Directed by Chuck Jones - MM

    15. Hyde And Hare (1955) BtT
    Directed by I. Freleng - LT


    Disc Two:

    16. Beep Beep (1952) **
    Directed by Chuck Jones - MM

    17. Going! Going! Gosh! (1952)
    Directed by Chuck Jones - MM

    18. Zipping Along (1953) BtT
    Directed by Chuck Jones - MM

    19. Stop! Look! and Hasten! (1954) **
    Directed by Chuck Jones - MM

    20. Ready, Set, Zoom (1955)
    Directed by Chuck Jones - LT

    21. Guided Muscle (1955) AA
    Directed by Chuck Jones - MM

    22. Gee Whiz-z-z-z! (1956) AA
    Directed by Chuck Jones - LT

    23. There They Go-Go-Go! (1956) AA
    Directed by Chuck Jones - LT

    24. Scrambled Aches (1957) AA
    Directed by Chuck Jones - LT

    25. Zoom And Bored (1957) AA
    Directed by Chuck Jones - LT

    26. Whoa, Be-Gone! (1958) **
    Directed by Chuck Jones - MM

    27. Cheese Chasers (1951) **
    Directed by Chuck Jones - MM

    28. The Dover Boys (1942) **
    Directed by Chuck Jones - MM

    29. Mouse Wreckers (1948) **
    Directed by Chuck Jones – MM – Academy Award Nominee

    30. A Bear For Punishment (1951) **/AA
    Directed by Chuck Jones - MM


    Disc Three:

    31. Bad Ol' Putty Tat (1949)
    Directed by I. Freleng - MM

    32. All a Bir-r-r-rd (1950)
    Directed by I. Freleng - LT

    33. Room And Bird (1951)
    Directed by I. Freleng - MM

    34. Tweet Tweet Tweety (1951) AA
    Directed by I. Freleng - LT

    35. Gift Wrapped (1952)
    Directed by I. Freleng - LT

    36. Ain't She Tweet (1952) **
    Directed by I. Freleng - LT

    37. A Bird In A Guilty Cage (1952) AA
    Directed by I. Freleng - LT

    38. Snow Business (1953)
    Directed by I. Freleng - LT

    39. Tweety Pie (1947) **
    Directed by I. Freleng – MM – Academy Award Winner

    40. Kitty Kornered (1946) **
    Directed by Bob Clampett - LT

    41. Baby Bottleneck (1946) **
    Directed by Bob Clampett - LT

    42. Old Glory (1939) **
    Directed by Chuck Jones - MM

    43. The Great Piggy Bank Robbery (1946) **/BtT
    Directed by Bob Clampett - LT

    44. Duck Soup To Nuts (1944)
    Directed by I. Freleng - LT

    45. Porky In Wackyland (1938) **
    Directed by Bob Clampett - LT


    Disc Four:

    46. Back Alley Op-Roar (1948) **
    Directed by I. Freleng – MM

    47. Book Revue (1946) **
    Directed by Bob Clampett - LT

    48. A Corny Concerto (1943) **
    Directed by Bob Clampett - MM

    49. Have You Got Any Castles? (1938)
    Directed by Frank Tashlin - MM

    50. Hollywood Steps Out (1941) **/BtT
    Directed by Tex Avery - MM

    51. I Love To Singa (1936)
    Directed by Tex Avery - MM

    52. Katnip Kollege (1938)
    Directed by Ben Hardaway & Cal Dalton - MM

    53. The Hep Cat (1942)
    Directed by Bob Clampett – LT – (The First Color LT)

    54. Three Little Bops (1957) **/AA/VO
    Directed by I. Freleng - LT

    55. One Froggy Evening (1955) **/BtT/AA
    Directed by Chuck Jones - MM

    56. Rhapsody Rabbit (1946) **
    Directed by I. Freleng - MM

    57. Show Biz Bugs (1957) **
    Directed by I. Freleng - LT

    58. Stage Door Cartoon (1944) **/**/BtT/AA/VO
    Directed by I. Freleng - MM

    59. What's Opera, Doc? (1957) **
    Directed by Chuck Jones - MM

    60. You Ought To Be In Pictures (1940) **
    Directed by I. Freleng – LT

    LT – Looney Tunes
    MM – Merrie Melodies


    ** = Commentary
    AA = Alternate Audio
    BtT = Behind the Tunes
    VOT = Vocal Only Track

    As for the packaging, similar to last year, Volume Two consists of four discs housed in a 5 panel Digipak which slides nicely into a cardboard slipcase. This time, there is a hole in the center of the packaging as to allow a window to see Daffy and Bugs. Bugs Bunny is featured mainly on Disc One while the focus of Disc Two is reserved for The Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote. Disc Three concentrates on Tweety & Sylvester, while Disc Four highlights a number of other WB animated “all-stars”. Throughout the course of the set, there are a number of shorts which contain Commentaries and many that contain music & effects-only audio tracks. There are also a few shorts that contain a Behind-The-Tunes featurette – all of which are selectable with an icon placed next to the short or can be accessed in the special features section. These have all been marked accordingly on the list above. The special features appear throughout the course of the set and are detailed specifically below. All of the shorts can be watched consecutively by selecting the “play-all” feature.

    Also similar to last year, is the release of Looney Tunes Spotlight Collection Volume Two, which features 30 animated shorts – all of which appear in addition to 30 other shorts on the Golden Collection. The set lists for $26.99 but you’ll not be afforded the bonus features, inclusive on the Golden Collection.

    I’m not sure if it’s still in print, but for WB animation enthusiasts, I highly recommend you pick up a copy of Jerry Beck & Will Friedwald’s book, “Looney Tunes And Merrie Melodies – A Complete Illustrated Guide To The WB Cartoons”. I picked up a copy back in 1990 and it has been my bible ever since. A great companion for WB fans.

    One last thing; while the issue has been debated at length, I’m of the opinion that these animated shorts belong in the “Film” section of the forum. Sure, the vast majority of us here remember these from television, but these were not created for T.V. These were created, by and large, as a form of entertainment, in a manner that would precede a full length feature film. Not to say that putting these among the T.V. releases would be wrong per se, but in light of WB’s “A Night At The Movies” and their inclusion of these shorts with many of their classic releases, they are more accurately represented in a manner of film than that of television. Really, at the end of the day, where this review appears is of very little consequence as long as it is enjoyed by all.

    Considering the amount of interest this forum has for Looney Tunes, it was my hope to have this review posted long before street date but unfortunately I only received it on Monday and considering its enormity, I was only able to post it today. Sorry folks.

    The Feature: 5/5
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]



    Video:
    I remember what struck me initially upon reviewing the original Volume, were the colors. They literally jumped off the screen. Well, the same holds true for Volume #2. The greens are lush and rich and the reds are wonderfully vibrant and never bleeding, while hues and the level of saturation appears to be perfect. Gone, are the memories of faded cartoons that seemed dull and tired.

    Some of these shorts look better than others, but overall, the video presentation is terrific. Sharpness was equally impressive. The level of image detail is fantastic while never looking digitized or sterile. WB has done an amazing job of maintaining a fine balance while allowing these to retain their look of film. Contrast levels and shadow detail were also just as impressive.

    Sure there is a fair amount of scratches and blemishes as well as cell dust and dirt, however, I’m confident the cleanup was thorough and effective as to not alter the look of the animation. Obviously a moderate amount of fine film-grain is still (and thankfully) present, again, allowing and reminding us we are watching “film”.

    All of the included shorts have newly remastered transfers and the image quality appears terrific as a result. I feel pretty comfortable in stating that I doubt these have ever looked better.

    Great job…!!

    Video: 5/5
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    Audio:
    The set comes with the original DD Mono soundtrack and it is as good as we could ever hope for. The tonality and its characteristics changed from episode to episode, but by and large, I was very impressed with this set overall.

    Most of the shorts are virtually hiss free and are without any pops or other distractions. If there was any hiss removed, it was done so, in a manner, as not to compromise or affect the natural tonality. Most of the dialogue comes across quite nicely and is always bold and intelligible regardless of the music or sound effects. There were only a couple of occasions where I thought the audio was slightly strained – very slight.

    Typical of sets from a variety of years etc., several of the shorts are mixed with slightly different levels than others. No big deal.

    As for the dynamics, again, we are talking monaural shorts, some of which date back almost 70 years, so our expectations shouldn’t be unrealistic. But the shorts do deliver with a rather impressive dynamic range which even includes some oomph in the low end when necessary. These offer up a satisfactory representation of the technology that was, many years ago, very limited.

    A super effort… near flawless.

    Audio: 4.5/5
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    Special Features:
    And you thought the special features on Volume #1 were overwhelming…! Volume #2 is no less impressive. Let’s get started.

    Disc One:
    [*] Commentaries – This is just a separate way of accessing the commentary tracks. All of these can be played in succession by utilizing the “play-all” feature. Featured are Bill Melendez, June Foray, Greg Ford, Jerry Beck, Chuck Jones and Michael Barrier.
    [*] Alternate Audio Programs - This is just a separate way of accessing the audio tracks. All of these can be played in succession by utilizing the “play-all” feature.
    [*] Bugs Bunny Looney Tunes All Star 50th Anniversary Part 1. This feature was originally a 50 minute TV special that aired in 1985 and the show has been split in two for the purpose of including it on the set. There is a huge ensemble of various celebrities who recount how they love working with various LT characters or how certain ones tend to be jealous etc. While the inclusion is appreciated, it grows old rather fast. Duration: 24:39 minutes.
    [*] A Conversation With Tex Avery. This is a rather short featurette as Tex Avery talks about a number of experiences and reflections from when he started working for the studio and discussing his propensity of over-exaggeration within his style. Too bad this wasn’t longer - it’s the crème de la crème of features on this disc. Duration: 7:06 minutes.
    [*] The Bugs Bunny Show – Similar to Volume One, a selection of “Bugs Bunny Show Bridging Sequences” have been included – in this case, for the “Do Or Diet” and “No Business Like Slow Business” episodes. The Audio Recording Sessions with the legendary Mel Blanc in the recording studio are superb and they are accompanied by still photographs and screen shots. Duration: 6:02 and 4:16 minutes respectively.


    Disc Two:
    [*] Commentaries – This is just a separate way of accessing the commentary tracks. All of these can be played in succession by utilizing the “play-all” feature. Featured are Greg Ford and Michael Barrier.
    [*] Alternate Audio Programs - This is just a separate way of accessing the audio tracks. All of these can be played in succession by utilizing the “play-all” feature.
    [*] The Adventures Of The Road Runner – is the TV Pilot for the half-hour television and is a compilation of Road Runner shorts. Duration: 25:54 minutes.
    [*] Crash! Bang! Boom!: The Wild Sounds Of Treg Brown – is an homage to the man who was ultimately responsible for the zany sound effects that were instrumental to the gags of the shorts. Included is Brown among archival footage, as well as a clip of him featured in a WB short as a prized fisherman. Duration: 11:12 minutes.
    [*] The Bugs Bunny Road Runner Show Opening Sequence – The final feature on the disc are the main titles for The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show. Duration: 2:12 minutes.


    Disc Three:
    [*] Commentaries – This is just a separate way of accessing the commentary tracks. All of these can be played in succession by utilizing the “play-all” feature. Featured are Martha Sigall, John Kricfalusi, Greg Ford, Jerry Beck and Michael Barrier.
    [*] Alternate Audio Programs - This is just a separate way of accessing the audio tracks. All of these can be played in succession by utilizing the “play-all” feature.
    [*] Bugs Bunny Looney Tunes All Star 50th Anniversary Part 2. This is merely the conclusion of the original feature which appears on disc one. Don’t get me wrong, there are a number of great clips and brief commentaries from many of the WB participants but there is an awful lot of tripe to wade through to get to it. Duration: 23:27 minutes.
    [*] Daffy Duck For President is a new animated short completed just for this set and based on the book, written and storyboarded by Chuck Jones. To be honest, I’m less than impressed with this newer effort and admittedly, as much as I love classic WB animation, I’m of the opinion that it can’t be, nor shouldn’t reproduced or replicated in modern times. Pass… Duration: 4:31 minutes.
    [*] Man From Wackyland: The Art Of Bob Clampett - Is a superb little featurette which takes a dissecting look at the director whose energetic, wacky and screwier style was inimitable. There are several instances where his shorts are dissected on frame by frame analysis, and his unique style of animation of widely varying frames is examined. Several Clampett fans participate including Clampett’s daughter Ruth, Leonard Maltin, John Kricfalusi, and Jerry Beck. Considering Clampett is unequivocally my favorite WB director, it should be of no surprise that this feature was a welcomed inclusion. Great clips - Great stuff…! Duration: 21:11 minutes.
    [*] Opening Sequences. The final feature of the disc includes the sequences for The Porky Pig Show and The Bugs Bunny And Tweety Show and we’re given two alternate versions. The first, for the 1988 series and the Bugs Bunny show theme again, with re-animated costumes and a setting replacing the vaudeville style routine for a variety-show idea while the second clip contains newer animation. Duration: 1:18 and 2:52 minutes respectfully.


    Disc Four:
    [*] Commentaries – This is just a separate way of accessing the commentary tracks. All of these can be played in succession by utilizing the “play-all” feature. Featured are Greg Ford, Jerry Beck, Stan Freberg, Chuck Jones, Michael Maltese, Maurice Noble, Daniel Goldmark and Michael Barrier.
    [*] Alternate Audio Programs - This is just a separate way of accessing the audio tracks. All of these can be played in succession by utilizing the “play-all” feature.
    [*] Vocal Only Programs – Is a feature which showcases vocal tracks for “What’s Opera, Doc” and “Three Little Bops”. These are compilations of several edited clips as well as audio interviews. Very neat. Duration: 6:42 and 6:53 minutes.
    [*] Behind The Tunes – Includes three Behind The Tunes featurettes including Looney Tunes Go Hollywood, as it discusses the Termite Terrace and many of Hollywood player parodies so often associated with Looney Tunes. Next up is “It Hopped One Night: A Look At One Froggy Evening” which exaimines the making-of the Chuck Jones masterpiece. And the final discussion focuses The Making Of “What’s Opera, Doc”. It’s an interesting and important special considering the magnitude of “What’s Opera Doc” and “One Froggy Evening”. Duration: 9:19, 7:10 and 9:31 minutes.
    [*] From The Vaults – Finally… more shorts From The Vaults, So Much For So Little is a wartime propaganda piece, which won an Oscar for Best Documentary Short. The second short is a comedy called Orange Blossoms For Violet. This is a 1952 Freleng/Jones short where various animals speak and interact with among themselves with the voices of Mel Blanc. Duration: 10:19 and 9:20 minutes respectively.

    While Volume Two may appear slightly thinner in terms of special feature numbers, these are no less substantive containing plenty of historical and entertaining information to complement this wonderful collection – certainly enough for me to allow a near perfect score.

    Special Features: 4.5/5
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    **Special Features rated for the quality of supplements, not the quantity**




    Final Thoughts:
    I absolutely adore WB animation. Like the majority here, I grew up watching these on television and have a sense of appreciation and admiration for those who created these which I hold extremely high. And while I said the set was worth waiting for, remember there are over 1000 WB animated LT & MM shorts. So at a rate of 60 shorts per year, I’m afraid I’ll be an old man before the end is in sight. C’mon Warner Brothers, perhaps two sets a year…?

    The set is virtually perfect, from the presentation - to the selection of shorts - to the inclusion of special features, which are beyond monumental. I really can’t find a single thing to complain about. Warner Brother’s animation is without question, the brightest ever committed to celluloid and has become engrained within our culture. There’s really no question… if you’re a fan of WB animation and even a classic film buff, you need to add this to your library. Eagerly anticipating the release date of Volume Three…..

    Overall Rating: 5/5 (not an average)
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]





    Release Date: November 2nd, 2004
     
  2. Roger Rollins

    Roger Rollins Supporting Actor

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    As usual, an amazing review from Herb for an amazing prodct. I got mine yesterday, and it helped brighten my spirits during an otherwise dreadful day.

    Warner has astounded with THAT'S ENTERTAINMENT, now this, and next week GONE WITH THE WIND.

    Who would have ever expected to see the original titles restored to BOOK REVUE. Now THAT'S heaven!
     
  3. Keith Paynter

    Keith Paynter Screenwriter

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    Or BACK ALLEY UPROAR (I think)...
     
  4. Gordon McMurphy

    Gordon McMurphy Producer

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    It's a great, great set; one of Warner's finest achievements. I've been rolling on the floor all week and I still haven't watched all the shorts yet! It feels so good to finally have "One Froggy Evening" at last... "Hello ma baby, hello ma honey, hello ma ragtime gaaaal!"

    Hopefully, this is not all, folks, and we get a third volume next year.

    Great review, Herb! You never fail to impress!
     
  5. Bryant Trew

    Bryant Trew Second Unit

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    All I want to know is if Kill the Wabbit is on this one.
     
  6. Lars Vermundsberget

    Lars Vermundsberget Supporting Actor

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    I agree with Herb that these belong in the "Film" section, not "Television".

    I was under the impression that "Porky in Wackyland" was identical to "Dough for the Dodo" (seen in the first set). I think I got that impression from Maltin's "Of Mice and Magic". Any comments?

    And, BTW, this review makes me want to buy the set. [​IMG]
     
  7. Roger Rollins

    Roger Rollins Supporting Actor

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    Yes.

    WHAT'S OPERA, DOC? has completed restoration. and is not only on there, but has a 'making of' and you can hear the recording sessions.

    Fascinating.

    I am enjoying this set even more than last year's and last year's was my disc of the year.

    There is more laughter to be had from the contents of this box, than from any DVD source around.
     
  8. SteveK

    SteveK Supporting Actor

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    I have this on order from DV2, and to say the least, I'm very much looking forward to receiving my set. Unfortunately, that probably won't be until next week, as they apparently haven't mailed it yet. For some reason, I've never even finished Volume 1, so I have a lot of catching up to do.

    So many DVDs to watch, so little time! But that's a problem I'll take anytime.

    Thanks for the great review.

    Steve K.
     
  9. StephenP

    StephenP Stunt Coordinator

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    Does anyone have a list of the spotlight contents? I'd like to get the cheaper version since I never fully watched the entire first set. If "Whats Opera Doc" and the singing frog one are there that would be all I need to know.
     
  10. Jay Pennington

    Jay Pennington Screenwriter

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    DOUGH is a color remake of "WACKYLAND". Reanimated from the ground up, with a couple of extra gags and other variations here and there. But yes, pretty much identical.
     
  11. Randy Korstick

    Randy Korstick Producer

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    Thanks for the great review Herb and for placing it in the proper forum. I can't wait to get this set even if there is too much Road Runner for me.
     
  12. PaulP

    PaulP Producer

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    The only argument you really need for this, is that this set contains ACADEMY AWARD nominees and winners. They give those to theatrical films, don't they - not TV shows... that's Emmys. [​IMG]
     
  13. Tony Whalen

    Tony Whalen Producer

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    Great review! I gotta run and pick this up! [​IMG] MEEP MEEP!

    I only wish that "Transylvania 6-5000" was included. But having "What's Opera Doc" and "One Froggy Evening" will certainly prevent me from whining. [​IMG]
     
  14. Patrick McCart

    Patrick McCart Lead Actor

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    Just got the DVD set.... wonderful stuff!

    This has a ton of my favorite cartoons (namely Book Revue, A Corny Concerto, The Dover Boys at Pimento University or the Rivals of Roquefort Hall, The Great Piggy Bank Robbery, Porky in Wackyland, Hollywood Steps Out, Rhapsody Rabbit, You Ought To Be in Pictures, What's Opera Doc, and Katnip Kollege)

    The bonus materials are great... especially the complete "The Adventures of the Roadrunner," So Much For So Little, Orange Blossoms for Violet, the Tex Avery clip, etc.

    I can't believe What's Opera, Doc? has two commentaries, a music-only track, a vocals-only/outtakes track, as well as a making-of featurette.

    However, I wonder why some of the cartoons on the 4th disc are interlaced instead of progressive. It can't be because of the added footage on some of them since other restored-titles cartoons are fully progressive. However, it's not that big of a deal since they're excellent transfers.
     
  15. Ken_McAlinden

    Ken_McAlinden Producer
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    What do you mean by cartoons being interlaced vs. progressive? Is there a flagging problem in the authoring? Is there 3:2 aliasing? Aren't all DVDs technically "interlaced", but progressive players can convert their contents to 480p (for NTSC).

    Regards,
     
  16. Scott Kimball

    Scott Kimball Screenwriter

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    Great review. Great set.

    I have long been a WB animation fan. I picked this up on release day - unfortunately, I don't have time to spend with it right now (though I couldn't resist popping in disc four for One Froggy Evening and What's Opera Doc?)

    I'm a Roadrunner fan, so I'm glad there's a good representation of those shorts, too.

    -Scott
     
  17. Lars Vermundsberget

    Lars Vermundsberget Supporting Actor

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    That cleared up the whole thing, thanks!

    Proves that my question didn't come right out of the blue. The next one might, though:

    "Kill the Wabbit": What's that? I couldn't find that title on the list. If it is indeed the title of a film...
     
  18. Ken_McAlinden

    Ken_McAlinden Producer
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    "Kill the Wabbit" is the line that Elmer famously sings along to the "Ride of the Valkyries" music in "What's Opera Doc".

    Regards,
     
  19. Craig S

    Craig S Producer
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    I'm glad someone else brought this up. I have a JVC progressive DVD player hooked up via component to a Sony 57" widescreen set. In sampling this set, I noticed significant combing in "I Love To Singa" on disc 4. The indictor on my player showed it was in film mode. All of the other shorts I looked at seemed OK.

    I'm wondering the same thing as Ken - is there an authoring problem (incorrect flagging) with some of the shorts on this disc???
     
  20. Casey Trowbridg

    Casey Trowbridg Lead Actor

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    Same here.

    Great review Herb, thanks for doing it.

    Picked this up release date without any hesitation.
     

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