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A Clockwork Orange (Anniversary Edition) Blu-ray Review



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#1 of 22 Cameron Yee

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Posted May 22 2011 - 08:01 PM


http://static.hometh...um.com/imgrepo/
A Clockwork Orange (Anniversary Edition)
Release Date: May 31, 2011
Studio: Warner Home Video
Packaging/Materials: Two-disc "Digi-Book"
Year: 1971
Rating: R
Running Time: 2:17:30
MSRP: $34.99 


  THE FEATURE SPECIAL FEATURES
Video 1080p high definition 1.66:1 Standard and high definition
Audio DTS-HD Master Audio: English 5.1 / Dolby Digital: French 5.1, German 5.1, Italian 5.1, Spanish 5.1, Castellano 5.1, Portuguese 5.1 Stereo
Subtitles English SDH, French, German SDH, Italian SDH, Castellano, Dutch, Chinese, Spanish, Portuguese, Danish, Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish Variable

 
The Feature: 5/5
Gangs of ruffians keen on physical assault, rape and robbery have been terrorizing the citizens of London. A particularly brutal band is lead by Alex DeLarge (Malcolm McDowell), a young man from a modest if largely un-influential family. Despite their wanton criminality, Alex and his friends (or “droogs” in their vernacular) have so far managed to elude arrest, but a home invasion that goes too far (and a well-timed betrayal) ultimately lands Alex in prison for his deeds. Though he has things pretty easy there - being a favorite with the prison chaplain - his life is also the very definition of dull. When he learns of a special program that could shorten his sentence, he jumps on the chance, even though he knows very little about the process that will supposedly transform him into an upstanding citizen. The chaplain warns him that undergoing the procedure could mean giving up the very thing that makes him human, though if that means a better life for Alex and the society he returns to, isn’t that worth the sacrifice?

Director Stanley Kubrick’s darkly satirical film, adapted from Anthony Burgess’s novel by the same name, caused quite a stir when it came out in 1971. Its depictions of violence unsettled audiences and - in a case of convenient scapegoating - were credited for inspiring a series of similar crimes committed by young men. It ultimately lead to Kubrick pulling the film from British theaters, though American audiences still got to see it, albeit a version with less explicit sexual content. By today’s standards, the film of course seems tame, though no less incisive given there is an obvious point behind the stylized violence, unlike some of today’s films that depict mayhem for its own sake. Unfortunately it can take extremes like a “Saw” or “Hostel” to throw something like “Clockwork” into sharp relief, making it obvious as both a work of art and a keenly observant social commentary. Its themes around free will, psychotherapy, politics and even violence itself remain insightful and relevant, though that’s not a total surprise. Kubrick - from the projects he chose to the methods he employed to bring them to fruition - was always a director ahead of his time.

Video Quality: 4/5
The film is accurately framed at 1.66:1 and presented in 1080p with the VC-1 codec. Past reviews of the title on both Blu-ray and HD-DVD have noted the image’s softness or haziness. Indeed, there are times when the picture simply isn’t sharp, especially by today’s standards and expectations; but we also must keep in mind Kubrick’s love of experimentation with camera optics and photographic processes. So it’s reasonable to assume the film’s sometimes indistinct qualities were either intentional or acceptable byproducts of whatever equipment the director was keen on at the time. Other aspects of the image are more consistent - particularly black levels and color, which are deep and well rendered, though contrast can be also be a bit variable. The transfer contains no artifacts from excessive digital tinkering, however, preserving image characteristics that are ultimately inherent to the source.

Audio Quality: 4/5
Dialogue in the 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio mix is consistently clear and intelligible. The surrounds provide light to moderate levels of support for the film score, with only slight use of those channels for directional or environmental effects. LFE is non-existent, but the track has decent depth and fullness during the synthesized elements of the score.

Special Features: 5/5
The extras include the items from the 2007 single-disc Blu-ray edition, with a few additional items, the most significant of which is the in-depth documentary "Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures." That piece was previously available in a DVD boxed set, so there may be some overlap of extras for Kubrick fans. Within the set of extras itself there is some unavoidable repetition of content given the sheer amount of material, but there’s no denying the special features contain a wealth of information.

The following includes content from HTF's review of the 2007 single-disc Blu-ray edition, by Kevin Koster.

Collectible Book integrated into the packaging includes numerous production stills, cast and crew biographies, trivia, a novel vs. film comparison, and an essay about the film’s development and production. 

Digital Copy download through a website. The offer expires March 27, 2012.

[Disc One]

Commentary by Malcolm McDowell and Historian Nick Redman is essentially an interview of McDowell by Redmond as they watch the film with us. There’s some great stuff here, and McDowell has a great recall for the people he was working with, both in front of the camera and behind it. McDowell provides a lot of gems throughout, including an acknowledgement that his opening toast to the audience was his way of saying “You’re in for one hell of a ride.” Another highlight is his recall of meeting Gene Kelly with both men knowing what McDowell had done to Kelly’s signature song in the movie. [Kevin Koster]

Still Tickin': The Return of Clockwork Orange (43:42, SD) SPOILER WARNING ON THIS ONE: WATCH THE MOVIE OR READ THE BOOK BEFORE READING THIS. This documentary was actually made for British television several years ago, to coincide with the re-release of the film in British cinemas after Kubrick’s death. It’s an interesting piece of work, containing a history of the book and the film, and containing several criticisms of Kubrick. In the first place, Kubrick is criticized for not including the ending to Burgess’ book, in which Alex chooses to reform himself. This is passed off as the result of Kubrick only reading the American printing of the book, which omits that chapter – but that idea has been disproven by other sources which say that Kubrick didn’t like that ending and chose to end the film the way he did. Another criticism is raised regarding the film being pulled from British cinemas after violence erupted, but not being pulled from cinemas or video release anywhere else. The long-standing story of this is that Kubrick was upset by the copycat violence that broke out and did not wish to encourage it. This documentary follows a different thought – that Kubrick was warned that the copycats might actually seek him out at his remote estate. As you may gather, this is prickly stuff – and it really falls on the viewer to make up their own mind about the material. But it certainly makes for nearly 45 minutes of interesting viewing. [Kevin Koster]

Great Bolshy Yarblockos! Makin A Clockwork Orange (28:19, SD) acts as a counterpoint to the Channel Four documentary, re-asserting Kubrick’s creative choices and discussing how he made the film on a lower budget and achieved his results. There’s great stuff in here, including discussions about the costuming and lighting, and an account of what happened when McDowell panicked during the filming of the infamous brainwashing sequence. It’s probably best to watch both documentaries together, to get the full picture. My only complaint here, is that this featurette, for some reason, is not anamorphically encoded, unlike everything else on the disc. It’s not a big thing – just a bit disconcerting. [Kevin Koster]

Turning like Clockwork (26:19, HD) is a new featurette that analyzes the film’s depiction of violence - the role it served, how the public and media responded to it at the time, and how it compares to today’s films and media.

Malcolm McDowell Looks Back (10:30, HD) is another new piece that features McDowell reminiscing about the film, spurred on by various bits of “Clockwork” photographic memorabilia. His most lengthy story is about shooting the brainwashing scene, which may be somewhat different from what’s related in other pieces.

Original Theatrical Trailer (1:03, SD)

BD-Live

[Disc Two]

Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures (2:22:15, SD) is an in-depth and fascinating look at Kubrick’s career, from his early work as a photographer for Look Magazine to his films, starting with the documentary short “Day of the Fight” to his most notable features like “Paths of Glory,” “Spartacus,” “Lolita,” “Dr. Strangelove,” “2001” and “A Clockwork Orange.” The piece includes numerous interviews with colleagues, families and friends sharing anecdotes - some of them around his personal life, debunking much of his reputation as a recluse - but focused mostly on his professional work. Directed by Kubrick’s brother-in-law Jan Harlan, the 2001 documentary is narrated by Tom Cruise and presented in 4:3 aspect ratio with most film clips matted in their original aspect ratio. The piece was previously included in the “Stanley Kubrick Director’s Series” DVD boxed set.

O Lucky Malcolm! (1:26:12, HD) is a feature-length overview of Malcolm McDowell’s career. It consists of video interview clips with McDowell, intercut with interviews of other filmmakers and wives and friends, as well as with clips from his movies. The overview jumps a bit from McDowell’s early career to his appearance in Time After Time, to a discussion of his work on Caligula, and then jumps over the 80’s and 90’s almost completely. (If you’re looking for an in-depth discussion of his work on Blue Thunder or Star Trek: Generations, you won’t find it here) McDowell comes across as a bit of a raconteur, continually coming up with amusing stories, some of which may actually stretch the truth a bit. And it’s a bit sobering to see the man suddenly age from a vibrant young man to the grizzled older man we see today. [Kevin Koster]

Recap
The Feature: 5/5
Video Quality: 4/5
Audio Quality: 4/5
Special Features: 5/5
Overall Score (not an average): 4.5/5
 
Warner Home Video turns in a fine presentation of Stanley Kubrick’s darkly satirical film that comments on everything from crime and violence to psychotherapy methods. The special features are sizable and in-depth, including items from past releases along with a few significant additions. Those who own one of the previous high definition releases will want to consider a purchase, especially for the documentary “Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures,” which was previously only available in a DVD boxed set. For those looking to add the title to their collections for the first time, the Anniversary Edition is the preferred release.

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#2 of 22 ChadMcCallum

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Posted May 23 2011 - 01:34 PM

Well, this one is a no brainer since I never did upgrade my old, extra-free dvd version. The only other thing I could ask for is an isolated score but that's not too big of an omission.



#3 of 22 Icaro

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Posted May 28 2011 - 04:39 PM

We want to open a petition ?
ask to Warner for a new  video track, with the new encoding present in the new Bonus features: Turning Like Clockwork  ?


Link

http://www.avsforum....=1313469&page=3 

 

__________________________________


Sorry for my bad English



#4 of 22 David Wilkins

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Posted May 29 2011 - 07:59 AM

How about releasing special features in 1080? If Criterion can manage to "budget" for doing so on nearly every special feature...so can the big guys. I'm sick and tired of down-resing for special features...it makes them a lot less special. Come on! You can do this! It's the 21st century, it's the age of hi-def.

Sorry to sound like such a bitch, but I'm getting tired of less than special, special editions. They couldn't manage it for an anniversary package such as this?


#5 of 22 Charles Smith

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Posted May 29 2011 - 08:18 AM

Second that.



#6 of 22 Oliver_A

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Posted May 30 2011 - 07:17 AM

I'm sorry, but this heavily filtered transfer never ever deserves a 4/5. A Clockwork Orange is one of my worst looking Blu Rays and pales in comparision to recent transfers of much less "important" films from the 1970's.


The film clips from the "Turning like Clockwork" documentary on the other hand reveal not only the original film texture, but also much more detail. This is a direct slap in the face of the customers, revealing that a much better master was available and could have been used.



#7 of 22 Icaro

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Posted May 30 2011 - 08:34 AM



Originally Posted by Oliver_A 

...revealing that a much better master was available and could have been used.




the thing that  gets more angry  is  that the master is the same,

simply in the documentary  is pure unfiltered ..





#8 of 22 Hollywoodaholic

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Posted May 31 2011 - 12:06 PM

Worst date move ever ....


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#9 of 22 David Wilkins

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Posted May 31 2011 - 12:19 PM

That depends entirely upon the date. :)



#10 of 22 robbbb1138

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Posted May 31 2011 - 12:54 PM


Originally Posted by Hollywoodaholic 

Worst date move ever ....


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Probably for a first date...



#11 of 22 gene c

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Posted May 31 2011 - 01:06 PM



Originally Posted by robbbb1138 



Probably for a first date...



Which would also be the last date.



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Also have  MB Quart Vera VS05 +.....too much to list. Help me.
 
 

 


#12 of 22 Josh Steinberg

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Posted May 31 2011 - 04:16 PM

I saw this once theatrically, and it was one of the most terrifying experiences of my life.  Not because of the film itself (which, to my mind, is still stunningly powerful all these years later) but because the crowd was filled with people who seemed to miss the point of the movie.  They were dressed as "droogs", and laughed, cheered and hollered with every act of violence - hearing people cheer during a rape scene as if they were going to see "Rocky Horror Picture Show" was just so disgusting to me, and I'm sure Kubrick would have been sickened if he had been made aware of that.  To this day, as much as I love the movie, I'm afraid to go see it in theaters again for fear of a repeat experience.  There are plenty of moments in this film so bizarre, so over the top that laughter or applause might be the appropriate response, but this crowd was just disgraceful.



#13 of 22 Hollywoodaholic

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Posted June 01 2011 - 09:11 AM

When I first saw the film three days after it orginally opened, people literally jumped out of their seats and stormed out of the theater - almost a third of the audience. Which is probably one of the reasons I count it among my favorite movies ever. Never has the power of the cinema been more powerfully displayed than this picture - which Kubrick himself agreed to be banned in the UK until his death 28 years later. But it was the work of a master at the top of his game provoking an audience beyond what they had ever experienced before. Bravo!



#14 of 22 Brandon Conway

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Posted June 01 2011 - 09:28 AM



Originally Posted by Hollywoodaholic 

Worst date move ever ....


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My Mom was taken to see it in 1971 on a date and she wasn't too happy about it. (She was a very conservative 18-year-old at the time). Suffice it to say her date was not my father. (Wonder if her date was the guy who wrote this...)


"And now the reprimand, from an American critic. He reproaches me for using film as a sacred & lasting medium, like a painting or a book. He does not believe that filmmaking is an inferior art, but he believes, and quite rightly, that a reel goes quickly, that the public are looking above all for relaxation, that film is fragile and that it is pretentious to express the power of one's soul by such ephemeral and delicate means, that Charlie Chaplin's or Buster Keaton's first films can only be seen on very rare and badly spoiled prints. I add that the cinema is making daily progress and that eventually films that we consider marvelous today will soon be forgotten because of new dimensions & colour. This is true. But for 4 weeks this film [The Blood of a Poet] has been shown to audiences that have been so attentive, so eager & so warm, that I wonder after all there is not an anonymous public who are looking for more than relaxation in the cinema." - Jean Cocteau, 1932


#15 of 22 Hollywoodaholic

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Posted June 01 2011 - 10:30 AM


Yikes! I can only tell you that one of the dates was in Maryland/D.C. area in 1971 and one was in Miami, Florida at an art house cinema around 1973,  so I made the same mistake twice.

Originally Posted by Brandon Conway 





My Mom was taken to see it in 1971 on a date and she wasn't too happy about it. (She was a very conservative 18-year-old at the time). Suffice it to say her date was not my father. (Wonder if iher date was the guy who wrote this...)






#16 of 22 Brandon Conway

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Posted June 01 2011 - 11:05 AM

LOL - I totally missed that you were the guy who wrote that blog, Wayne.


In any case - nope, it was in the San Jose, CA area.


"And now the reprimand, from an American critic. He reproaches me for using film as a sacred & lasting medium, like a painting or a book. He does not believe that filmmaking is an inferior art, but he believes, and quite rightly, that a reel goes quickly, that the public are looking above all for relaxation, that film is fragile and that it is pretentious to express the power of one's soul by such ephemeral and delicate means, that Charlie Chaplin's or Buster Keaton's first films can only be seen on very rare and badly spoiled prints. I add that the cinema is making daily progress and that eventually films that we consider marvelous today will soon be forgotten because of new dimensions & colour. This is true. But for 4 weeks this film [The Blood of a Poet] has been shown to audiences that have been so attentive, so eager & so warm, that I wonder after all there is not an anonymous public who are looking for more than relaxation in the cinema." - Jean Cocteau, 1932


#17 of 22 Brian Borst

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Posted June 04 2011 - 09:29 AM



Originally Posted by Hollywoodaholic 

Worst date move ever ....


http://www.hollywoodaholic.com



Could be worse. My mom once had a date with a guy who took her to see Caligula.


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#18 of 22 David Wilkins

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Posted June 04 2011 - 10:15 AM

When I was a kid, I remember my aunt relaying the disgusting date experience to my mother...the sickening horror of 'A Clockwork Orange'. Most of what she saw repulsed her, but being a good Southern Baptist, it was the line-dancing Jesuses statue that drove her out of the theater.


#19 of 22 Josh Steinberg

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Posted June 04 2011 - 12:06 PM

This is even worse - that Clockwork Orange screening I mentioned before, with all of the people cheering at the rape scenes and such - it wasn't a midnight showing but a regular evening presentation, and since I was under 17 at the time and it was rated R, I had to have my mother take me.  Now, my mom has great taste in a wide variety of films and is always willing to see something that I say is worthwhile (and has been that way ever since I became a total film dork around the age of 9), which I think is pretty cool - she had never seen Clockwork before at all (I had), and I said, you should take me, it's not an "easy" movie to watch but I think it's an important film, etc. - and as if sitting next to one's mom during all of that violence isn't enough, to have people cheering it on all around where you're sitting -- well, it's a miracle that more than ten years later she's still willing to see a movie I suggest.


(Caligula is a very guilty of pleasure of mine - even though I'd consider it the worst film ever made, I find it compulsively watchable and never boring - McDowell's commentary on the DVD is also priceless, well worth the cost of the set.)



#20 of 22 Brian Kidd

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Posted June 05 2011 - 11:01 AM

Oof. After looking at frame comparisons from the feature and the supplements, it really is a shame that Warner Bros. dulled the picture as much as they have. It really is a fairly startling difference in detail.


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