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Panasonic Launches BD-ROM Authoring Service in the US (MPEG-4)


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#1 of 8 Jeff(R)

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Posted June 22 2006 - 07:04 AM

Good news for those unhappy with MPEG2 titles.

Panasonic Launches BD-ROM Authoring Service in the US
Thursday June 22, 11:01 am ET

New MPEG-4 AVC Encoder and Blu-ray-Java Authoring System Expedite Production of Blu-ray Titles with 1080p-quality Pictures and Advanced Interactivity

Quote:
The equipment installed for this purpose includes a specially developed MPEG-4 Advanced Video Codec (AVC) encoder and a Blu-ray Java authoring system. The combination of the encoder and authoring system enables Blu-ray title creators to reproduce near-original, high-quality video with an easy-to-use graphical user interface (GUI) based on Java.

The new Panasonic encoder and authoring system support the Blu-ray Disc Association's BD-ROM specification, and take advantage of the disc's benefits including very high data compression, interactive menus and highly-advanced copyright protection. The Panasonic MPEG-4 AVC encoder, capable of more than twice the compression of conventional MPEG-2 encoding, maintains the highest- resolution 1080p image quality of the source. The result is a stunning picture which Hollywood studio experts have reckoned comparable to the original.

http://biz.yahoo.com...h096.html?.v=60

#2 of 8 Edwin-S

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Posted June 22 2006 - 07:29 AM

Looks like things are starting to roll. Now all we need to see is some actual product released that will live up to the hype. The next few months could prove to be very interesting.
"You bring a horse for me?" "Looks like......looks like we're shy of one horse." "No.......You brought two too many."

#3 of 8 Sean Bryan

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Posted June 22 2006 - 10:10 AM

That's nice to hear.

Though I'm curious why they didn't mention VC-1. One would hope that an authoring service would offer both advanced codes as options (in addition to MPEG-2).
I don't believe in transcending the genre, I believe IN the genre - Joss Whedon

#4 of 8 Lew Crippen

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Posted June 22 2006 - 02:06 PM

Don’t forget that you need two separate licenses for VC-1 and MPEG4. This in addition to making the toolkit harder to develop, maintain and debug.
¡Time is not my master!

#5 of 8 Chris S

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Posted June 22 2006 - 02:59 PM

I hear a lot about Microsoft and VC-1 licensing but not too much about MPEG4. So I did a little research, and for those interested in MPEG4 licensing, I found the following via wikipedia.org

Quote:
As with MPEG-2 Parts 1 and 2 and MPEG-4 Part 2 amongst others, the vendors of H.264/AVC products and services are expected to pay patent licensing royalties for the patented technology that their products use. The primary source of licenses for patents applying to this standard is a private organization known as MPEG-LA, LLC (which is not affiliated in any way with the MPEG standardization organization, but which also administers patent pools for MPEG-2 Part 1 Systems, MPEG-2 Part 2 Video, MPEG-4 Part 2 Video, and other technologies). Via Licensing also operates an H.264 patent pool. Some patent holders may not join either of the two licensing pools. (Licensing pools generally do not indemnify against third-party patents and cannot force patent-holders to join their pools.)

DVD & Blu-ray - It's all about the movies!

#6 of 8 Sean Bryan

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Posted June 23 2006 - 06:32 AM

Quote:
Don’t forget that you need two separate licenses for VC-1 and MPEG4. This in addition to making the toolkit harder to develop, maintain and debug.

Sure. But still, I would think a professional authoring service would/should be able to offer whatever a potential customer wants to use. If there are three codecs that are part of HD DVD and BD, then a professional authoring service should be able to use all three.

Having said that, if AVC performs as well as VC-1 has, and has the potential to continue to improve (as Microsoft's Amir says VC-1 can) then it's no big deal for us either way.
I don't believe in transcending the genre, I believe IN the genre - Joss Whedon

#7 of 8 Lew Crippen

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Posted June 24 2006 - 05:49 AM

Just a thought, but since there a HD-DVD authoring kit already exists, this company may be targeting a niche that is not yet filled. In that case, they would be correct in spending all of their resource on what is not available anywhere else.
¡Time is not my master!

#8 of 8 Kelly Grannell

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Posted June 24 2006 - 08:46 AM

Great news!





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