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Parametric EQ ?


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8 replies to this topic

#1 of 9 OFFLINE   Steve_Moo

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Posted June 09 2003 - 12:22 PM

My Receiver is able to Parametric EQ for each speaker but how do I know what my Bass, Mid, Treble Frequencies and Levels should be set at.

My options for Bass Freq are -63,80,100,125,160,200,250,320400,500,630,800 Hz, 1.0kHz

Bass Level is from +6db-(-6db)

Mid Freq is-
-250,320,400,500,630,800 Hz, 1.0,1.25,1.6,2.0,2.5,3.2,4.0 kHz

Mid Level is +6db-(-6db)

Treb Freq is
-1.0,1.25,1.6,2.0,2.5,3.2,4.0,5.0,6.3,8.0,10.0,12.5 ,16.0 kHz

Treb Level is +6db-(-6db)

I have Paradigm 7's as Mains, Paradigm CC-370 as Center, Paradigm ADP-170's as Surrounds and Paradigm Mini Monitors as Rears.

I'm not sure what my EQ levels should be set from my speakers spec's page(http://paradigm.ca/W....nitorSpecs.htm)

Anyone help me with this?

Thanks Steve

#2 of 9 OFFLINE   Karl_Luph

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Posted June 09 2003 - 02:11 PM

The beauty of the parametric eq is being able to sweep or dial in the sweet sound that sometimes just can't be reached with a graphic eq. It takes alot of trial and error to get it so don't feel bad if you just settle for what sounds about right to you. What kind of receiver do you have by the way?

#3 of 9 OFFLINE   Steve_Moo

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Posted June 10 2003 - 11:10 AM

But aren't these settings somehow affected by your speakers? Anyone know anything about this?

Thanks

#4 of 9 OFFLINE   Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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Posted June 10 2003 - 11:53 AM

Steve,

Do you have a manual for the receiver? If does it say if the treble and bass EQ’s are “shelving” or not?

This will help me make a recommendation to you on how to use it.

Regards,
Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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#5 of 9 OFFLINE   Steve_Moo

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Posted June 10 2003 - 11:58 AM

It says nothing about shelving in the manual anywhere under the Parametric EQ section.

Thanks Again

#6 of 9 OFFLINE   Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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Posted June 10 2003 - 03:24 PM

Forgot to ask - what kind of receiver (make/model) is it?

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Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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#7 of 9 OFFLINE   Steve_Moo

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Posted June 10 2003 - 09:17 PM

JVC's Flagship RX-DP10VBK.

#8 of 9 OFFLINE   StephenL

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Posted June 11 2003 - 03:57 AM

Your room acoustics are likely to effect the frequency response much more than your speakers. Try searching for "Behringer Feedback Destroyer" for more information about using a parametric EQ.

http://www.hometheat....berhinger.html
"It's most disappointing. I shall have to go all-out on some modifications."

#9 of 9 OFFLINE   Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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Posted June 11 2003 - 10:34 AM

Steve,

First, to clarify, what you have on your receiver is not a true parametric equalizer because there is no bandwidth adjustment. It’s more correctly a quasi-parametric, that is, a sophisticated tone control.

The equalizer on your JVC looks pretty nice for what it is. The available frequencies are closely spaced at 1/3-octave intervals. And the EQ is probably digital, which means it is very accurate and minimizes problems like phase.

Like Karl mentioned, this kind of equalizer can be helpful in making an improvement in the sound of your speakers. The equalizer does this by reducing frequencies that the speakers may reproduce as “hot,” or by boosting frequencies the speakers under-represent.

The trick is finding those “hot” or depressed spots (if indeed there are any).

Here’s how you do that.

Start with the midrange control and set it for 2.0kHz. Then bump the dB control up to max (+6dB), step by step, and note the change in the tonal characteristics that take place. Reset to 0dB, and then cut the dB control to –6dB, and again note the change in the sound. The volume should be set to a moderate volume while doing this.

Now that you have some idea of what you will hear when you adjust the equalizer, we’re ready to begin in earnest. For this evaluation you will want to use a fairly uncluttered music piece, like a 3- or 4-piece jazz ensemble with vocals.

Start with the midrange control set at its lowest frequency, 250Hz. What you want to do is run each available frequency setting, one at a time, up to +6dB and back to flat (0dB) and note the change in tonal characteristics as you boost to max. Continue until you cover all the mid frequencies you have available from 250Hz up to 4kHz.

What you are looking for is a frequency that does not seem to respond like the others. For instance, a frequency where it seems like very little happens when it’s boosted to max. Or a frequency that sounds more exaggerated than usual when boosted to max. This is a “flag” that there is a deficiency in the speaker at that particular frequency. Make a note on paper of these frequencies for future reference.

We started with the midrange control because it covers the frequency range where hearing is the most sensitive, which makes it easier to hear deficiencies. Now that you have your feet wet, move on to the treble next, followed by the bass. You only need to test the frequencies specific to those controls - there is no need to duplicate the test for frequencies that the midrange control covered.

You may note that with the upper frequencies, say above 5kHz or so, that you will hear less and less “action” at boost the higher up the frequency scale you go. This is natural; nothing to be alarmed about.

After you are finished, evaluate your findings. Remember that you have only three possible adjustments, so if you found more than three problems you will have to decide which ones to adjust and which to overlook.

To help with that decision: First be most concerned with the critical frequencies between 400Hz-4kHz than above or below that point. Next be concerned about exaggerated frequencies before under-represented frequencies, as the former is more audible and offensive to the ear.

Once you determine which frequencies you are going to adjust, the next thing is to determine how much boost or cut to apply. We boosted to the max during the testing process; you probably don’t want to do that as a final adjustment. Typically, a boost of 4dB or less is all you will want to do; occasionally you can cut more than that. (The exception to this is the bass frequencies below 100Hz.)

For frequencies you’re determined need to be cut, try this: Once again run up your target frequency to maximum boost, along with two or three frequencies on either side of it. Try this several times, each time applying less boost to the target frequency until it sounds about the same as the others, and make a note of the difference. For instance, if you had to cut the target frequency 3dB to get it to sound like the others, then that is the value you are looking for. Your final setting for this frequency will be –3dB (i.e., 3dB below flat or 0dB).

Once again, the determining factor should be your ear. Try switching back and forth between the equalized and flat settings and see if you equalized setting indeed sounds better. At this time you also might evaluate using greater or perhaps even less cut, say, -2dB or –4dB.

For frequencies you found that need to be boosted, that’s a little trickier. Basically, boost them to 4dB or so and pay attention to the way the CD sounds. The change you hear should be subtle, but better. If the change is exaggerated, then you are “bloating” the adjacent frequencies and doing as much harm as good. So reduce the amount of boost applied. Remember, the ultimate goal of this kind of equalizing is to achieve an improvement, not perfection.

Be careful about boosting frequencies above 3kHz. You are applying increased signal (or voltage) at that frequency. Excessive boosting of treble frequencies can blow the tweeter if you are partial to running your system at high volumes.

Regards,
Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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