1. Guest,
    If you need help getting to know Xenforo, please see our guide here. If you have feedback or questions, please post those here.
    Dismiss Notice

Speaker Calibration

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by MikeTz, Apr 5, 2003.

  1. MikeTz

    MikeTz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2003
    Messages:
    146
    Likes Received:
    0
    I read about a LASER speaker calibration tool made by Checkpoint (they also make one for M&K) that sounds very interesting. The device is essentially a LASER pointer with a flat magnetic end. The flat end goes on the speaker face near the middle and the speaker is positioned so the LASER points to the listening position. Sounds like a useful tool, anyone have experience with this product? If so can you direct me to a store that sells this product?

    Thanks

    MT
     
  2. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2001
    Messages:
    1,373
    Likes Received:
    0
    mike, this is a simple laser pen one sees all the time. HTF admin Bob McElfresh likes this method and has a number of posts here.

    In essense, the laser is lightly taped to the top of the L then R main spkr, and one has three choices to work with:

    1. The beam intersects exactly where your ears sit in the chair,
    2. One foot behind this spot, and
    3. One foot in front.

    If one has another person in the sofa, then focusing behind the couch tends to widen the sweet spot, but this can be a fragile compromise by collapsing.

    Depending on one's spkrs, and room characteristics, one shoots for the best imaging while playing a DVD or CD in two-chl mode to achieve that phantom center. Afterward, the CC takes up the work in 5.1 tracks.
     
  3. Lee Bailey

    Lee Bailey Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2000
    Messages:
    263
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Central California
    Real Name:
    Lee Bailey
    Be aware that most laser pens are not actually calibrated to shoot the beam straight out as pointed. You need to put the pen on a flat surface, turn it on, and aim it at a wall. Roll the pen and note if the beam stays on the same same vertical level. Mark the pen where the beam is the highest, to give you a reference when placing it on a speaker.
     

Share This Page