Sony destroys your speakers

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Brandon B, Aug 2, 2001.

  1. Brandon B

    Brandon B Second Unit

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2001
    Messages:
    265
    Likes Received:
    0
    I heard a news story this morning on a network affiliate (KNX Los Angeles) radio that a new Sony CD copy protection scheme would introduce watermarks which when copied digitally would create segments of howling distortion which could damage or ruin speakers.
    I am assuming this is severe misinterpretation on the news copy writer's part about the recent method of introducing areas of white noise which error correction glosses over, and is incorrect about the speaker damaging part. Has anyone else heard this?
    Seems very ridiculous and liable to bring lawsuits against any label attempting it, as no one has full control over what CD's are played on their systems. Even Microsoft doesn't blow up your computer if you use pirated windows (and I'm sure they would if they could).
    Goofy news error or frightening new development?
    BB
     
  2. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1998
    Messages:
    21,769
    Likes Received:
    2
    Sounds like a goofy news error. Please don't be offended, but I suspect your topic header may tend to perpetuate it.
    M.
     
  3. Kevin P

    Kevin P Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 1999
    Messages:
    1,444
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sounds like the news story was a bit exaggerated. The scheme (if it works) would basically introduce clicks and pops into copies of "protected" material. Not enough to destroy speakers (unless perhaps if you listen at ear-bleeding levels at the threshold of amp clipping to begin with).
    There's already a thread on this topic: click here. It's not just Sony either, it's our old pals Macrovision that developed the scheme (or one of them anyway), and a few record companies have been quietly slipping us "protected" discs for several months now, on a trial basis. They won't tell us what CDs have the scheme though.
    KJP
     
  4. DaleB

    DaleB Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2000
    Messages:
    103
    Likes Received:
    0
    TSK, TSK!
    [Edited last by DaleB on August 02, 2001 at 10:43 AM]
     
  5. DaleB

    DaleB Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2000
    Messages:
    103
    Likes Received:
    0
    If your speakers can survive some of the techno music out there, they should do just fine!
    Then I would say, "SONY! Bring it on!"
     
  6. Kevin P

    Kevin P Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 1999
    Messages:
    1,444
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  7. KyleS

    KyleS Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2000
    Messages:
    1,232
    Likes Received:
    0
    Kevin now that funny [​IMG]
    I can agree that Sony should bring it on as it just might improve some of the music out there today.
    KyleS
    [Edited last by KyleS on August 02, 2001 at 01:31 PM]
     
  8. Peter McDonald

    Peter McDonald Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2001
    Messages:
    205
    Likes Received:
    0
    I just found this news story at a computer site: http://www.theregister.co.uk/content/54/20809.html
    It's about the copy protection, and how when duplicated, it can ruin speakers. However, someone has already bi-passed the copy protection. There is a link at the bottom of the page about it (Sony just started testing the copy protection last month and someone has found a way around it, too bad Sony)
    Peter
     

Share This Page