Don't forget Daylight Savings!

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Rob Lutter, Apr 6, 2003.

  1. Rob Lutter

    Rob Lutter Producer

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    Set those clocks 1 hour forward! [​IMG]
     
  2. Michael*K

    Michael*K Screenwriter

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    I HATE losing an hour's sleep. [​IMG] Last October, I was in Vegas when we had the time shift and I got an "extra" hour's worth of vacation. [​IMG]
     
  3. Max Leung

    Max Leung Producer

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    Nooooo! And I just stayed up until 4 AM (5 AM!) watching movies on my HT1000.

    Ahhhhhhhh!
     
  4. Rob Lutter

    Rob Lutter Producer

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  5. Jesse Skeen

    Jesse Skeen Producer

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    I HATE Daylight Savings time- didn't even know it was this weekend til I woke up this morning (or afternoon more accurately!) Why can't they just keep the time the same all year round- it still stays light outside during summer anyways!
     
  6. LewB

    LewB Screenwriter

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    A snow storm is predicted for these parts for tomorrow. They claim that it will leave 5-9 inches of snow !![​IMG] [​IMG]
    I used to associate daylight savings time with summer [​IMG]
     
  7. Greg*go

    Greg*go Supporting Actor

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  8. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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  9. Wayne Bundrick

    Wayne Bundrick Cinematographer

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    Quit playing God and live life the way it's meant to be lived? God didn't invent the clock.

    What is "life the way it's meant to be lived"? Seems to me that we are meant to wake up at sunrise and go to sleep at sunset. But the times of sunrise and sunset change with the seasons and don't happen exactly like clockwork. Don't you think it's a good idea to adjust our clocks every now and then so that we don't wake up two hours after sunrise? Or must we always be slaves to the infallible Almighty Clock?
     
  10. Glenn Overholt

    Glenn Overholt Producer

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    Greg, sorry, but your theory won't hold s***. If what you say is true, then if you divided the number of days for DST in half, that date should be on the longest day of the year, but it isn't even close.

    This isn't against you, but there isn't any explanation for this except to say that someone in DC can't add/subtract, etc, but we won't go there.

    Glenn
     
  11. James T

    James T Screenwriter

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    If people are complaining about DST, just set up a farm somewhere in Manitoba. They don't have to deal with DST because it screws up the timeset for all their animals.
     
  12. Michael*K

    Michael*K Screenwriter

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  13. Greg*go

    Greg*go Supporting Actor

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    Glenn...

    First of all, no offense taken at all. I agree with you to an extent (obviously since you're correct), but here's my thoughts about governments reasoning, it isn't the longest day of the year that they are concerned about, but when it actually gets dark out. And I know it gets dark later in July then it does in June, so maybe that's their where it comes from... if you take the middle of DST, maybe that's near the day it gets dark out the latest. After the beginning of summer, in the middle of June, the sun starts to rise later, but it still sets later too. This is strictly a guess though, which could be wrong... the U.S. could do it for another reason. Other countries do it at different times too, so we all have our reasons I guess. I believe the European Union just came up with a DST method for all that are involved in it, so that should be a bed of complaints. And FYI, the only major industrialized country that doesn't do DST is Japan.

    Every year I do some research on this topic whenever it comes along because I always forget the stuff I read. HowStuffWorks.com used to have a better article about it, now they actually give you a short answer, and a link to the first link I gave you.

    Although some people seem angry in this thread about it, I've read about others getting much more upset over it. And I don't see what the big deal is. The first link mentions how pissed off people were when the U.S. tried to standardize time. The people in Detroit actually refused to go by their "Time Zone," and had a "Detroit Time" for a few years before they eventually gave in. All this stuff just reminds us all that time-telling is a man-made thing, which can be fixed to our liking... And if you don't like it and want to live in the U.S., you can either move to Eastern Indiana, Hawaii, or Arizona. [​IMG] (I learned that from setting my time zone in Windows programs)

    And to think, this all came from a friendly reminder! lol

    Greg.
     
  14. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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  15. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    how can I forget DST. I worked until 8pm on saturday, and had to go back in sunday morning and work from 4am to 8am to cover for DST problems. No sleep for me [​IMG]
     
  16. Glenn Overholt

    Glenn Overholt Producer

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    Ok, here's the crude math, for anyone that wants it and hasn't done it yet. This year, DST started on the 13th, so I'll add up 17 days for the rest of April, 30 in May and 21 in June to get to the day that we have equal days and nights - 12 hours each. 17 + 30 + 21= 68 days.

    The other half would be the remaining 9 days in June and 31 in July. That comes to 40, and only leaves 28 to total 68 again, and thus it should end on Aug. 28th.

    If it was off by a week or two I wouldn't mind, but it is closer to 2 months. I think it just makes us look dumber and dumber every year that we don't fix it.

    I think that more than anything else it would benefit the kids going to and from school. I'd prefer to have them do that when it is light outside.

    There is also a greater benefit to places closer to the North Pole due to the greater fluctuation of the Earth, but we all know that!

    Glenn
     
  17. Carl Johnson

    Carl Johnson Cinematographer
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    There's nothing to worry about here in Indiana, we don't use DST.
     
  18. Greg*go

    Greg*go Supporting Actor

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    Well, I suppose you and I will have to agree to disagree, Glenn. I fully understand your rationale though, but instead of looking at it that way, why not look at it like this... Why do we even bother changing back to Standard Time at all if we benefit so much from DST? I think the answer will appear to you on October 25th when we're still using DST, and it's not completely sunny out at 7:30a.m. That's the only reason why I think we go back to standard time at all, because it becomes illogical for us to keep using DST if we're waking up in the morning and using the lights, and when we're leaving the house in a twilight hour. DST loses it's energy saving, and safety benefits in the winter time, so we abandon it until they become useful again. This just happens to be early spring, which I agree with, it was after 7:30 before I turned on any lights last night.

    But by the end of October, it gets to a point where I'm wanting to go back to EST because it's dark out when I leave for work, and it's dark out when I get out, so where's the benefit? (plus I supposedly get an extra hours sleep or staying up, depending on how you look at it.. [​IMG] ) At least by switching back to standard time, I can see the sun in the morning.


    And depending on how old anyone reading this is, you might remember that Congress put the U.S. on an "extended year round DST" in 1973 & 1974 due to the oil crisis. And a main reason why the stopped that in '75 was because of farming states complaining. The fact that they did this for 2 years should just prove why we only use this for a convenience and nothing more. Me being born in '79 wouldn't remember this, but I do recall reading about it last year and found the article again this year.
     
  19. Anders Englund

    Anders Englund Second Unit

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    Yea, this is a really odd thing. You have this hour, which you lose in the spring. Then it's gone, all the way through the summer, and then you get it back in the fall.

    Where the hell is that hour in the meantime??? [​IMG]

    --Anders
     
  20. Kevin P

    Kevin P Screenwriter

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    Here's my (irrational) thoughts on DST:

    1. If it's meant to save electricity by extending evening daylight hours, we need it *more* in the winter than the summer. Just as the days are getting shorter and the sun is setting around 6 PM, we change BACK to standard time and then I'm driving home from work in the dark until March or so. I say if we are going to do away with the time change, keep it on DST year round.

    2. While there's nothing wrong with gaining an hour of sleep in the fall, how about putting the spring forward time change at say, 2 in the afternoon on a weekday? That way instead of losing an hour of sleep, we get a shorter work day once a year.

    Anders: that hour goes where one sock in every laundry load goes. Unlike the socks though, we get it back in the fall. [​IMG]
     

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