CAT 5 Question

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Shawn C, Aug 17, 2005.

  1. Shawn C

    Shawn C Screenwriter

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    Ok, I have a question before I start wasting cable.

    My home came pre-wired with CAT 5 cable throughout. The only problem is that they didn't terminate any of the connections in my "tech box". I am using a cable modem that is connected to my D-Link wireless router (that has 8 hardwired ports available).

    I want to get a couple of my CAT 5 connections live. I am planning to just put connectors onto the cat-5 in in the "tech box" and plug the needed oned into the router. The ports in the rooms are already hooked up, so I will just use a spare patch cable to connect from the wall to the PC.

    Do I just terminate the connectors in the box using the standard "pass-through" method or do they need to be "crossover" type?
     
  2. Christian Behrens

    Christian Behrens Supporting Actor

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    I'm not sure what you mean by "terminate", but what I can tell you is that cross-over type cables are ONLY used when directly connecting two computers. Whenever there is any other networking equipment involved (routers, hubs, switches), ordinary cabling is to be used.

    -Christian
     
  3. Tekara

    Tekara Supporting Actor

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    I'll re-itterate that you don't need terminators on BaseT networking. Last time I ever saw them was in a Thicknet LAN which is severely outdated.

    When running patch cables from the switch/router to the wall panels use straight cabling. Most recent networking hardware can auto-detect whether you are using straight or crossover cable so there may be some leeway if you have to improvise.
     
  4. Mike Fassler

    Mike Fassler Supporting Actor

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    yes use straight thru cables, crossover cables are only needed for connecting pc to pc or for when routers/switches cant autodetect cabling.
     
  5. StevenFC

    StevenFC Second Unit

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    Ditto everyone else.

    Unless you're running a 10base2 or 5 bus network (highly unlikely), you shouldn't need to terminate anything--unless your talking about grounding or something. Electricity is not my area of expertise. Do you just mean plugged in?

    Yeah, crossover cables are rarely used. In my experience they're not even always needed PC to PC.
     
  6. Shawn C

    Shawn C Screenwriter

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    Cool. Thanks everyone! What I meant by "terminate" was "stick a connecter on the end of the cable and plug it into the router" [​IMG]

    I am heading out today to buy some connectors and a crimper.
     
  7. StevenFC

    StevenFC Second Unit

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    Oh boy, good luck with that. I'm assuming you have experience witht that. Otherwise, make sure to have a nice collection of swear words handy. [​IMG]
     
  8. Paul Padilla

    Paul Padilla Supporting Actor

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    FYI Shawn, even though you're wiring straight through, there are two standards for the pinout. Just make sure you look at the order at the jacks that are already wired and match that.

    After you strip the outer sheath back 3 inches or so, untwist the conductors and straighten the 8 wires as much as possible so they run side by side in order with no bends...to about 5/8 to 3/4 inch from where the sheath begins. Hold them tightly between your thumb and forefinger of your strong hand, then make a nice straight cut. (You'll need your strong hand to maneuver the wires into the connector.) Without moving your grip, take a new connector in your other hand and slide the two together...there are guides inside the connector for each conductor. Make sure all 8 wires are pushed all the way in and are even. The connector should go over the sheathing slightly...then crimp away.

    It wouldn't hurt to invest in an inexpensive tester that includes a loopback plug for the wall jack too.
     
  9. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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  10. StevenFC

    StevenFC Second Unit

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    Good advice Paul. I'd also recommend a magnifying glass. And don't forget the swear words. [​IMG]
     
  11. Paul Padilla

    Paul Padilla Supporting Actor

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    Your link is right on...there is an A and a B standard that the conductors can get inserted into the connector. It makes no difference wich one is used as long as the same standard A or B is used on both ends.

    In my experience the B version seems to be much more prevelant. White-orange....orange...white-green...blue...white-blue...green...white-brown...brown looking down on the connector with the end facing away from you. But regardless, Shawn needs to examine the existing wired jacks to be sure which one to use.

    BTW...expletives [​IMG] are a standard item in my tool kit. [​IMG]
     

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