A few words about…™ Knowing — in 4k UHD Blu-ray

Shot digitally in 4k, and completed as a 2k DI, Lionsgate's new 4k UHD release with HDR, works nicely in the format, but don't expect that true 4k pop. 4 Stars

Knowing, directed by Alex Proyas, is an interesting sci-fi / thriller.

In 1959, a young girl contributes a strange page of numbers to a school time capsule, while her classmates draw pictures for inclusion.

2009, the capsule is opened, and the tale begins.

What did the young schoolgirl know? How does it affect those half a century later.

An interesting, thoughtful exercise in the genre.

Shot digitally in 4k, and completed as a 2k DI, Lionsgate’s new 4k UHD release with HDR, works nicely in the format, but don’t expect that true 4k pop.

The Dolby Atmos track works beautifully for the subject, with theater-filling audio, with nice use of height channels.

Image – 5

Audio – 5 (Dolby Atmos)

Pass / Fail – Pass

Recommended

RAH

Published by

Robert Harris

author,member

30 Comments

  1. I really like this film, up until the denouement, which is a bit too metaphysical for my tastes. To that point, however, I thought Cage's performance was excellent, and the secondary characters well-developed. I just intrinsically love these sci-fi movies that have mysteries attached, which adds a sense of wonder and intelligence to the mix.

  2. Robert Harris

    Forgot to mention, that at about the 90 minute mark, score goes into full Bernard Herrmann mode.

    Yes, it's a score I listen to periodically. Keep an eye on Marco Beltrami.

  3. The Airplane scene is one of my favorites on Bluray. The kicker is I have only seen it on demo disks I have never seen the whole movie. To say I am stoked to see the whole thing in Atmos is an understatement!

  4. Johnny Angell

    I'm not asking to discuss religion, but I'd like to know if this movie is a heavy duty religious flick?

    No, I don't recall that it touches on religion at all. I suppose you could draw some parallels with some of the events, but it's not a central theme.

  5. Josh Steinberg

    It's hard to answer your question without discussing the very end of the film.

    But I don't see the film as being a religious picture overall.

    Same here, I don't see the film as being a religious picture overall.

  6. I bought the bluray for $1 just for the airplane crash scene after my original copy was stolen. That scene is simply fantastic. Hearing it in Atmos is very intriguing, may have to seek this out.

    Not sure how I feel about the movie. It was enjoyable until the end, but I remember not being happy with the end. My tastes have changed though, maybe I'll like it this time around.

  7. Johnny Angell

    I'm not asking to discuss religion, but I'd like to know if this movie is a heavy duty religious flick?

    Well, yes, but only at the end, which is why the finale kind of disappoints me. I haven't a religious bone in my body. But I would still highly recommend it.

  8. Dick

    Well, yes, but only at the end, which is why the finale kind of disappoints me. I haven't a religious bone in my body. But I would still highly recommend it.

    Me neither. We rented it on Amazon and are watching it now.

  9. I loved this movie up until the ending. Great mystery, really creepy atmosphere at times. And yes, the plane.

    But for me it felt like they threw religion in there at the end just to ratchet up the conflict of Nicholas Cages choice. They didn't explore it well so it rang hollow to me. I think it was supposed to be a tragically hopeful ending. But if Cage and his family are okay with his decision its because of blind faith and a renewed sense of familial
    love. Kind of an allegory to religious faith. But I have trouble that anyone of deep religious faith would have made the same decision. So for me the filmmakers betrayed religion in order to promote religion.

    I'm probably not explaining myself well, and I don't want to digress into specific religious topics, but it just didn't work for me.

    Although I probably won't re watch it, I would still encourage those who haven't seen it to watch it. It is very well made.
    I guess its true that a great ending can save a dreadful film, and a dreadful ending can ruin an otherwise great film. And this falls onto the latter category for me.

  10. Johnny Angell

    I'm not asking to discuss religion, but I'd like to know if this movie is a heavy duty religious flick?

    It's not religious at all, but a LOT of people have misinterpreted it as such. It is really, deeply, Science Fiction. Roger Ebert seemed to be one of the few critics who understood that when it came out. In fact, I take it as an homage to a particular Arthur C. Clarke novel. I'll put the title in a spoiler at the end of this post, because people have already been spoiling enough of this thread.

    Both the movie and the novel I'm referring to have essentially the same outcome. Not in the specific details, but in the result and the actions that lead up to it. The movie is presented as a mystery, so it doesn't spell out what is happening and who is involved (the icons) the way the novel does. They both have visual icons which are not actually religious, but have become part of religious imagery. This also brings up one of Clarke's own rules, "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic"… or the supernatural/religious. The difference is that in the two stories, those icons have resulted in opposite perceptions. This is only my interpretation, but it is one that hit me over the head immediately the first time I saw Knowing years ago.

    I hope I've managed to give an explanation without spoiling anything for anyone who hasn't already seen the movie. What I've said shouldn't make any sense until after seeing the movie.

    Spoiler: The Novel I’m referring to
  11. Josh Steinberg

    JohnRice, I wanted to say all of that but was struggling with finding the right words. Excellent post!

    Thanks. I love this movie, and I've watched it many times & thought about it a lot through the years. The fact is, I like this interpretation so much, that if it's wrong, I don't want to know it. I don't care. It's what the movie means to me and anything different will only diminish it.

  12. I remember renting this movie solely for the sake of making fun of it. I thought the trailer was pretty bad, and I didn't realize that Alex Proyas (Dark City, The Crow) was the director. I said to myself, "I want to watch a bad movie about numbers and laugh at it." And then I started the movie, and I found myself instantly captivated. It took on heavy subject matter and didn't run from the implications of that subject – it followed the story to its natural conclusion in a way that I felt most filmmakers would shy away from. It had the courage of its convictions. I came away completely impressed and wound up buying the Blu-ray.

    The only problem was, I still wanted to watch a bad movie about numbers. So I then watched "The Number 23" with Jim Carrey and that was indeed a bad movie about numbers.

  13. JohnRice

    The movie is presented as a mystery, so it doesn't spell out what is happening and who is involved (the icons) the way the novel does. They both have visual icons which are not actually religious, but have become part of religious imagery.

    I would argue:

    Spoiler
  14. Adam, you can adopt that interpretation, because if that is your interpretation, it can also be the interpretation of everything positive (or negative, for that matter) in every story that's ever told. I just choose not to adopt that specific interpretation for the exact same reason. Because it can be used to explain every positive thing in every story ever told, which makes things a bit two dimensional for my tastes. To me, the far more interesting idea from the novel I referenced is…

    Spoiler
  15. In this specific case, my interpretation is rooted in the idea of predestination. No matter what actions the characters took, the final outcome was preordained. Lucinda, and then later Caleb and Abby, are prophets. The chariot imagery from the Book of Ezekiel threaded throughout foreshadows ascension to God's throne. Even though the movie gets its terminology muddled, the tension inherent in the narrative is whether the universe operates via naturalism, as a series of complex interactions between random occurrences and causality, and some form of intelligent design in which there is a grand design and events in the universe are unfolding according to it. And the ending, to my mind, firmly comes down in the latter camp. The characters possess and exhibit free will, but are ultimately powerless to deviate from the grand plan.

  16. Went ahead and blind-bought this based on RAH's recommendation and the fact that I'm a huge fan of The Crow and Dark City (one of my favorite all-time movies). I'm willing to overlook Gods of Egypt. 😀

    Should arrive by the weekend, so I'll be putting my new sub to work it sounds like with this soundtrack.

  17. Like others, I would have preferred a different ending. But I hope all the talk about the ending isn't discouraging people from giving it a try.

    IMHO, this is still a very good movie, and I would strongly encourage anyone who hasn't seen it to check it out.

  18. Well, coming late to the discussion, I have to say I did take the film to be kind of religious, in the sense of thinking about whether a complete determinism necessarily involves some kind of religious framework. It's like time travel adventures in that for time travel to be possible at all, again, you have to buy into a "hard" deterministic view. Philosophically, I don't buy it, but in terms of crafting a narrative, some sort of determinism is probably unavoidable, given that the writer/director/person behind the curtain stands in the position of deity to his/her own creation. Apologies for the vagueness but I too am trying to avoid spoilers. Saw this in the theatre, and got it on BR as soon as it came out. Proyas is nothing if not a visionary.

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