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Terrell Davis retires at age 29.


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#1 of 34 KeithH

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Posted August 18 2002 - 01:52 AM

Heard this on ESPN this morning. Denver Broncos running back Terrell Davis announced his retirement at age 29. He never fully recovered from an ACL injury. Davis had a great career, but unfortunately, it was far too short.
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#2 of 34 Robert Crawford

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Posted August 18 2002 - 02:13 AM

Ask Gale Sayers about having a short NFL career, when he retired at 28 years old.




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#3 of 34 Patrick Sun

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Posted August 18 2002 - 02:14 AM

At least he got 2 rings. Last week, Terrell couldn't even stretch out to warm up.

I was watching an ESPN special report on running backs last Tueday evening, and they were talking with the current crop of "seasoned" RBs like Jerome Bettis, Garrison Hearst, Terrell Davis (I think), and the ESPN reporter showed Bettis footage of an Earl Campbell interview segment where it showed how difficult it is for Campbell move around and walk (very slowly now), and has nerve damage to his legs, and a condition called "dead foot" where he can't lift his feet up and down at the ankle joint. This was mostly damage from his 8 punishing seasons as a NFL RB. Campbell said that he used to slow down in the middle of a rush attempt so that he could hit a defensive player.

Bettis' jaw was on the floor as he watched the Campbell footage because he's in his 9th year, and obviously he was scared that he could wind up like Campbell by age 46. Bettis has already noticed things about his body that aren't normal anymore. The main piece of advice the old RBs gave to the younger RBs in the league: Don't be afraid to run out of bounds to preserve your health. But most young RBs are bound and determined to show the coaches that they are a gamer and can be count on to get the tough yards, but those same coaches will turn away from you once you don't have the speed, power and quickness to do the job in the NFL anymore (average tenure for RBs is around 3-4 seasons).

That and the discussion on surgeries to knees and other crucial joints of the body made it apparent that you are never quite the same after undergoing the knife, mainly due to the scar tissue that builds up and detracts from flexibility and quickness for the athletes. It was quite a sobering piece.
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#4 of 34 felix_suwarno

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Posted August 18 2002 - 03:36 AM

what are they gonna do for a living after retiring at such age? do they have any other expertise?

#5 of 34 CarlS

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Posted August 18 2002 - 03:50 AM

This is really a shame for Terrell. His is/was a great running back and it would been interesting to see exactly what he could have accomplished.

Assuming that he managed his money properly, he shouldn't need to work. Prior to his first knee injury, he signed a lucrative contract with the Broncos with a significant signing bonus.

#6 of 34 Dave E H

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Posted August 18 2002 - 04:51 AM

I'm not sure I agree with some editorials I've seen that he's a Hall of Famer. Some equate his career w/ sayers, so there might be some merit in TD's election, but I'm not sold on it.

#7 of 34 Patrick_S

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Posted August 18 2002 - 05:03 AM

Quote:
what are they gonna do for a living after retiring at such age? do they have any other expertise?
TD did make millions while he did play so perhaps he's already set for life.

As far as this talk about him going in the Hall if it were up to me the only way he would get in is if he buys a ticket.

His career was just to short to merit the hall. Besides the fact that the Broncos were able to plug in other RBs behind their once mighty OF line and have them gain over a thousand yards should hurt TD’s chances. If the writers look at that fact they’ll realize that the line was a big part of TD’s success.

Of course as a Raiders’ fan, (and since no one died) anything that diminishes the Broncos is generally good news.

#8 of 34 Josh Lowe

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Posted August 18 2002 - 05:13 AM

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what are they gonna do for a living after retiring at such age? do they have any other expertise?

Even if they're making the league minimum they should be set. And I don't know of any starting running backs that are making anywhere close to the minimum. If they pissed away their money, then I hate to say it but too bad. There certainly have been enough examples of this already.

Additionally, the NFL has a pretty impressive pension/health/benefits package for players that are forced out of the game due to injury.

#9 of 34 Scott Merryfield

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Posted August 18 2002 - 05:24 AM

I think Davis is borderline Hall of Fame material. While his career was short, he did accomplish quite a bit in that time. He gained 2,000 yards rushing one year, won a Super Bowl MVP award and was instrumental in Denver's first SB championship.

On the other hand, the fact that other running backs also prospered in Denver when Davis was injured does hurt his cause. Both Olandis Gary and Mike Anderson had 1,000+ yard seasons filling in for an injured TD. That indicated that Denver's system and excellent offensive line were a big part of Davis's success.

While Davis's numbers compare favorably with Gale Sayers, TD will never be remembered as Sayers was -- as one of the most dynamic runners in NFL history. Sayers and Barry Sanders were probably the most exciting RBs to ever play in the NFL.

Davis's championships will probably allow him to get into the Hall eventually, but it's no sure thing.

#10 of 34 Robert Crawford

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Posted August 18 2002 - 05:27 AM

Sayers helped revolutionize the game with his exciting style of running which helped the NFL greatly during the 1960's, when football was overtaking baseball in the television ratings.





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#11 of 34 Bruce Hedtke

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Posted August 18 2002 - 05:40 AM

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what are they gonna do for a living after retiring at such age? do they have any other expertise?


One would hope that with so many examples of former pro athletes who are now broke, and the fact that there is no guarentee in the NFL as far as a career goes (you know, fine one day, the next your career is over with an injury), players with a couple years experience would have invested and saved wisely and would set themselves off. Of course, there is still going to be players who think their invincible and spend all the money they have. As for Terrel, I heard he was a bright cookie and does hold a college degree. If he wants to work, or needs to, I don't see him having a problem.

OTOH, all this talk already about Davis being a "lock" to make the Hall of Fame is silly. The guy had some incredible years. Some. He only played seven seasons and three of those were riddled with injuries. While Davis certainly had the potential to be a Hall of Fame player, he didn't have enough great seasons. I don't think having 4 or 5 great seasons is a qualifier for the HoF. But, since guys like Howie Long and Dan Hampton are in, why not Terrel Davis? For what it's worth, however, I believe guys like Brett Favre are borderline as far as Hall of Fame goes, so perhaps my standards are too stringent.

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#12 of 34 Scott Merryfield

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Posted August 18 2002 - 06:45 AM

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For what it's worth, however, I believe guys like Brett Favre are borderline as far as Hall of Fame goes, so perhaps my standards are too stringent.

Bruce,

A Wisconsin-ite who doubts Favre's Hall of Fame credentials?! Posted Image Say it isn't so! Posted Image

Actually, I think Favre is a shoe-in for the Hall. How can the NFL's only player to win three consecutive league MVP awards not be in the Hall of Fame?

#13 of 34 Robert Crawford

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Posted August 18 2002 - 07:15 AM

Bruce,
Comparing defensive linemen to running backs can get you tangle in your spurs when it comes to comparative arguments like this one. Also, Hampton played 12 years and Long played 13 seasons which is quite a bit longer than Davis's career.



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#14 of 34 Jeremiah

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Posted August 18 2002 - 07:29 AM

It sucks that his career is now overPosted Image.

Terrell Davis was one of the greatest Running Backs in the history of the league but some bad luck will keep him from owning quite a few NFL records, and if he stayed healthy we would be talking about where TD stands with the all-time greats; Payton, E. Smith, Brown.

If anyone watched TD run they would know that he was a superstar player, the guy had it all, vision, toughness, power, quickness and great RB instincts. To bring up what OG and MA did just belittles the type of player Terrell Davis was.

To have over 6,000 yards, 2 rings, a SB and NFL MVP award, by the end of your 4th season is just a spectacular accomplishment; if it wasn't for some bad luck the man would have over 10,000 yards by the age of 29 and on pace to shatter(or at least surpass) E. Smith's soon to be record. The guy was awesome.

Now I don't know if TD should be in the HOF but Gale Sayers never had any type of season comparable to what TD had done and TD does have more rushing yards than Sayers.

What a freaking bummer.
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#15 of 34 Robert Crawford

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Posted August 18 2002 - 07:46 AM

Why is it that player careers from another era are downplayed for their contributions to the game and the level of their play in order to buoy the career of more recent players?




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#16 of 34 Patrick_S

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Posted August 18 2002 - 08:59 AM

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Why is it that player careers from another era are downplayed for their contributions to the game and the level of their play in order to buoy the career of more recent players?
Sadly it seems to be the nature of some fans.

#17 of 34 Evan S

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Posted August 18 2002 - 10:03 AM

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As far as this talk about him going in the Hall if it were up to me the only way he would get in is if he buys a ticket.


Terrell Davis is definately going to be in the Hall. Save this thread and mark my words. First of all, he is one of only 4 players to eclipse 2,000 yards in a season and the other three guys who did it either in the hall or are going to be there shortly. Second, for the 4 year span from 19995-1998, Terrell Davis was the best back in the game...period. That is the measure of greatness. Are you the best at your position and did you change the outcome of games/teams. Before Terrell, the Broncos lost 4 Super Bowls. With Terrell they won two...and bested a highly favored Packers team in the first one when they were 14pt underdogs (the biggest underdog to win a Super Bowl since the Jets in '69).

The fact that his career was ended by injury will only enhance his chances of getting in the hall because football is the only sport where acceptance is not generally just about numbers. The fact that Sayers is in there with fewer yards, fewer MVP awards and NO championships means that there is no way Terrell won't get in there. IMO, what he accomplished in his short time is worth admission. Plus, he was generally liked by both fans and the media, which usually carries some weight as well.

People say that his accomplishments were diminished by the fact that Gary/Anderson were able to both run for over 1,000 yards in his absence. True. However, the Broncos record since Terrell's first injury is 35-33. In the four seasons before his injury they were 54-17 (including playoffs).

I highly doubt they keep him out. The committee usually recognizes potential and realize Terrell would have had more than enough stats to make it had he not gotten hurt.

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#18 of 34 Patrick_S

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Posted August 18 2002 - 10:25 AM

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People say that his accomplishments were diminished by the fact that Gary/Anderson were able to both run for over 1,000 yards in his absence. True. However, the Broncos record since Terrell's first injury is 35-33. In the four seasons before his injury they were 54-17 (including playoffs).
Before his injury didn't they also have some guy named Elway at QB? Perhaps he also had something to do with some of those 54 wins but that is just a guess on my part.

Look I know TD was a very good player and perhaps I shouldn't have used my ticket joke but I really do think his lack of longevity will hurt him in the long run.

#19 of 34 Evan S

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Posted August 18 2002 - 11:27 AM

In the three years previous, with Elway and WITHOUT Terrell, the Broncos went 24-24 (8-8 in 1992, 9-7 in 1993 and 7-9 in 1994). In the four years after drafting Terrell, the Broncos went 54-18 (checked my research, added one more loss).

When the dust settles, to a man most people will acknowledge that TD was the reason Elway won those two rings, not vice versa.

In the year Elway had his greatest season and was named the NFL's MVP award winner, the Broncos went 9-7 and missed the playoffs. In Terrell Davis's greatest season (his MVP year), he rushed for 2008 yds and was held out of a lot of second half blowouts. He had 23 touchdowns. The Broncos won their first 13 games that year and threatened the Miami Dolphins perfect season. They walked through the playoffs virtually untouched and destroyed Atlanta in the Super Bowl by 15pts in a game that wasn't even that close.

By comparison (for those of you who like to argue for longevity and "body of work"), I give you...Tim Brown (for Raider fan Patrick).

Does Tim Brown deserve to go to the Hall of Fame? I'd argue definately YES. He has 9 straight seasons of over 1000yds. He has 937 career catches for over 13,000yds and 95 touchdowns. However, since coming to the Raiders in 1988, the LA/Oakland franchise is only 119-105. They have only 4 seasons in those 13 with double digit victories. They have not had a season better than 12-4 and they have had 9 seasons where they were either 7-9, 8-8 or 9-7.

Brown has been very consistent, but in 12 years he has only had two seasons with double digit touchdowns and his career high is 11. The Raiders are also 4-5 in playoff games with Brown and have never even played in a Super Bowl.

So, how do you judge greatness? Longevity? Consistency? Or being able to change the game? To bring your team to a title? To be able to reach a milestone only 3 people were able to reach before you?

I let you all be the judge of that.

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#20 of 34 Bruce Hedtke

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Posted August 18 2002 - 11:52 AM

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Does Tim Brown deserve to go to the Hall of Fame?

Quote:
Brown has been very consistent,


This is my problem with guys like Tim Brown, Howie Long or Dan Hampton. They are good players, no doubt. And they have played alot of seasons. But, shouldn't the Hall of Fame be more than that? Shouldn't you be a really, really special player to be inducted? I think so. This is why I feel the way I do. The media exposure players get now contributes greatly to the feeling that they are HoF calibur players. There are guys that come along and redefine the position, such as an L.T., or Ronnie Lott or Barry Sanders. Those guys definitely deserve the Hall. But, the Tim Browns are more or less good players who have long careers but don't do anything spectacular or memorable or prove they are head and shoulders above the rest of the players. That, to me, would be a basis for a Hall of Fame induction. Be spectacular. Be memorable. Prove you are head and shoulders better than other players. I'm sorry, but I don't care to see players who have been merely good their whole career making the Hall.

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