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New Special Edition Postage Stamps


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7 replies to this topic

#1 of 8 ONLINE   Johnny Angell

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Posted April 12 2014 - 01:08 PM

When I was a post office the other day they had a display of SE stamps. One caught my eye. There is a famous "mistake" stamp from long ago. It was of an very early plane and the plane was printed upside down. To this day, if memory serves, this is a very rare stamp and VERY valuable. This is also one of the SE reissues and it includes the upside down mistake. I am wondering if this reissue will effect the value of the original and rare stamp? I'm thinking not. This is, in essence, a reproduction of the original. What do you think?
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#2 of 8 OFFLINE   Clinton McClure

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Posted April 12 2014 - 02:53 PM

I have no solid facts to back up my opinion but I don't think it will affect the value of the original in the least.

#3 of 8 OFFLINE   Stan

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Posted April 13 2014 - 08:19 PM

When I was a post office the other day they had a display of SE stamps. One caught my eye. There is a famous "mistake" stamp from long ago. It was of an very early plane and the plane was printed upside down.To this day, if memory serves, this is a very rare stamp and VERY valuable. This is also one of the SE reissues and it includes the upside down mistake.I am wondering if this reissue will effect the value of the original and rare stamp? I'm thinking not. This is, in essence, a reproduction of the original.What do you think?

Not terribly knowledgeable about stamps, but do know this was the famous "Inverted Jenny", extremely rare.If somebody found a sheet of true, real "Inverted Jenny" stamps, it would probably have a huge effect on the market. Reproductions may possibly flood the market, but true collectors and people who do the appraisals would instantly know the difference.They've aged, different inks, etc. A repro can be nice, but certainly not the real thing. Nobody is going to fall for it. 


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#4 of 8 OFFLINE   Northgun

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Posted April 15 2014 - 09:30 AM

The reproduced stamp will have its own value that is completely separate from the value of the original stamp based on its supply and demand. The rare stamp's value depends on its own supply and demand. If anything, the reproduction can create more awareness for the original thus creating new demand for the original, which intern leads to a increase in value of the original. 

 

Even though I have a sizable stamp collection, I am nowhere near an expert. I have some basic knowledge on value and care for stamps. In the area of coins, on the other hand, I am very knowledgeable. I get paid to appraise coins at shows from time to time. I have a collection I am very proud of as well.



#5 of 8 OFFLINE   Aaron Silverman

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Posted April 15 2014 - 10:42 AM

Coin collecting and stamp collecting are not even on the radar of today's kids, but would probably serve a lot of them well. Keep the faith!


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#6 of 8 OFFLINE   Northgun

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Posted April 15 2014 - 09:34 PM

Coin collecting and stamp collecting are not even on the radar of today's kids, but would probably serve a lot of them well. Keep the faith!

Thats a common talking point at the coin shows. I've over heard quite a few dealers talk about how few people from the younger generations are at the coin shows these days. Its crazy to think that my wife and I are some of the youngest people that hit the shows. That being said though, I didn't start going to coin shows until I was 18 and had money to really start buying coins. Its hard to be a young collector because you have little access to nice coins. All I could do was punch pennies into my whitman album, which only keeps your interest for so long. Its also harder to find people who enjoy coins to share your hobby with at that age unless you happen to have someone in the family interested or a near by friend.



#7 of 8 OFFLINE   andrew markworthy

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Posted April 30 2014 - 12:33 PM

In answer to the original question - no, the new stamp will have absolutely no effect on the value of the original. Reproducing famous (and valuable) old stamps on new issues is very common, and nearly every postal organisation in the world has done it at least once. In recent years here in the UK, the Royal Mail has even gone to the extent of printing replicas of the original stamps (e.g. the famous Penny Black) using the original presses, for sale at specialist stamp fairs (the replica stamps are clearly labelled as replicas on the reverse, to prevent fraud).

 

With regard to the wider issue of younger adults not collecting anymore, I'm not sure the situation is quite as bad as is often painted. There are certainly far fewer younger people attending public collectors' shows, etc, but a lot are collecting on-line (ebay et al account for a huge amount of stamp collecting et al these days). Plus, prices for stamps at least have remained buoyant even through recent years, so folks are still buying these things! 

 

 Its also harder to find people who enjoy coins to share your hobby with at that age unless you happen to have someone in the family interested or a near by friend.

 

 

I think this is true, alas, for a lot of hobbies. I find it odd that whilst it's perfectly socially acceptable to go on and on about sport or cars, talking about stamps or coins is somehow a 'nerd' thing and suitable for mockery. But droning on about how some obscenely over-paid Neanderthals moved a ball round a field is fascinating and entertaining is it?



#8 of 8 OFFLINE   Northgun

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Posted May 03 2014 - 08:16 AM

I think this is true, alas, for a lot of hobbies. I find it odd that whilst it's perfectly socially acceptable to go on and on about sport or cars, talking about stamps or coins is somehow a 'nerd' thing and suitable for mockery. But droning on about how some obscenely over-paid Neanderthals moved a ball round a field is fascinating and entertaining is it?

lol, never thought of it that way. Luckily I haven't run into too many people who throw me in the nerd category just for being a collector. The funny thing is when I was dating my wife she looked at coin collecting as this retarded thing. She couldn't get passed the idea that'd I'd pay 50 bucks or more for a penny. As time when on though, she took more of an interest because of how much I enjoyed it. Eventually she started her own collection and now a days she just as interested as me in coin collecting. She also collects currency now (she always did before, she just never admitted it lol)






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