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Cold medicine now "behind the counter" in Texas


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21 replies to this topic

#1 of 22 Kyle McKnight

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Posted August 01 2005 - 02:45 AM

Just saw on the news this morning...effective today, any cold medicine that contains ephedrine or psuedoephedrine is now to be kept behind the pharmacy counter. To buy any you have to talk to the pharmacist, plus they log who you are and what you buy. They also said that you can only buy like two packages at a time...so no more keeping a stockpile without making multiple trips to different stores.

This is supposed to cut down on people making methamphetamines from cold medicine.

I don't take cold medicine so this doesn't have an effect on me right now...this would annoy the hell out of me if I did though.
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#2 of 22 Tim Hoover

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Posted August 01 2005 - 02:48 AM

Meth is pretty prevalent around here, so they've been doing this for a while now...when I made my last trip for allergy meds, I had to show ID when I purchased my box of Tylenol allergy/sinus, and could only buy two boxes at one time.
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#3 of 22 Mark Murphy

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Posted August 01 2005 - 02:55 AM

I guess they believe they can curb the production of Crystal Meth by restricting the availability of one of the major ingredients. I don't think it will work but thats why we elect lawmakers.Posted Image

I'm allergic to anything ephedrine so this won't affect me but its too bad that the government has to make OTC drugs BTC (behind the counter).

#4 of 22 BrianB

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Posted August 01 2005 - 02:56 AM

Quote:
I guess they believe they can curb the production of Crystal Meth by restricting the availability of one of the major ingredients.

Texas is following the lead of Oklahoma in this case.
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#5 of 22 Mark Murphy

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Posted August 01 2005 - 03:03 AM

Meth hasn't really caught on here yet. OCs and Heroin are still the major problem drugs but I'm sure its a matter of time before Meth does make its presence felt.

#6 of 22 Cameron Yee

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Posted August 01 2005 - 03:08 AM

You think BTC is bad?

http://www.katu.com/...ry.asp?ID=78646
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#7 of 22 Phil_L

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Posted August 01 2005 - 03:20 AM

Quote:
Meth hasn't really caught on here yet. OCs and Heroin are still the major problem drugs but I'm sure its a matter of time before Meth does make its presence felt.


Not sure if Meth has caught in RI or MA yet either Mark, but every CVS i enter in either state has put such products behind the counter. The minor inconvenience to me is well worth it. From what I understand, meth is quite a scourge on the lives of everyone around it.

#8 of 22 Jay Taylor

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Posted August 01 2005 - 04:20 AM

I guess they believe they can curb the production of Crystal Meth by restricting the availability of one of the major ingredients. I don't think it will work but thats why we elect lawmakers.


In Oklahoma the number of meth labs have dropped approximately in half after our version of this law was passed. You can still buy ephedrine or psuedoephedrine products at the drug store behind the counter.

This is an inconvenience that most of us have no problem living with considering the dramatic reduction in meth labs.
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#9 of 22 Garrett Lundy

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Posted August 01 2005 - 05:58 AM

Jefferson county is the meth-lab capital of NY! Posted Image

But I'm a traditionalist, so I'll stick to cheap booze.
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#10 of 22 Kyle McKnight

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Posted August 01 2005 - 07:55 AM

I guess I've just never been around a "meth area"...
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#11 of 22 D. Scott MacDonald

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Posted August 01 2005 - 08:00 AM

Meth labs are scary. My sister rented her house out to a lady, and then eventually the lady wanted to buy it so my sister sold it to her. About a week after closing, a meth lab was discovered in the house. My sister dodged a serious bullet here. Had she still owned the house, she would have had to pay serious bucks to clean it up, or possibly would have had to rebuild the house.
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#12 of 22 Garrett Lundy

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Posted August 01 2005 - 09:36 AM

Quote:
I guess I've just never been around a "meth area"...

They look like normal trailer parks except for the occassional burned-out shell of a single wide.
"Did you know that more people are murdered at 92 degrees Fahrenheit than any other temperature? I read an article once. Lower temperatures, people are easy-going, over 92 and it's too hot to move, but just 92, people get irritable."

#13 of 22 ChrisMatson

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Posted August 01 2005 - 10:00 AM

I guess they believe they can curb the production of Crystal Meth by restricting the availability of one of the major ingredients. I don't think it will work but thats why we elect lawmakers.

It is working in Iowa:
The number of clandestine methamphetamine labs busted up by Iowa law enforcement agencies last month plummeted 90 percent compared to July 2004, state officials said today.

They credited the state’s new tougher anti-meth law that went on the books in late May.

Gov. Tom Vilsack said the number of labs found since the law into effect has dropped 75 percent compared to late May, June and July in 2004.

The news was even better in July, he said, during which officials found 9 labs compared to 92 last year.

The tougher law limits access to a main ingredient in the manufacture of meth.

Despite the announcement, Vilsack and other officials worry Congress will pass legislation that pre-empts state law and weaken some of the measures.
The full article is available here.

#14 of 22 ChrisMatson

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Posted August 01 2005 - 10:17 AM

Another reason to get tough on meth:
...When labs explode, they not only kill and maim the cooks; they wreak financial havoc on the facilities that treat them, since the vast majority of meth victims lack health insurance. In Houchens's case, his hospital charges totaled more than $553,000, only $110,000 of which was recovered from Kentucky Medicaid. As many as a third of Vanderbilt's burn cases at a given time in the past year have been meth-related. "If we continue to take on this large burden" of $5 million to $10 million per year in uncompensated care, says Dr. Jeffrey Guy, Vanderbilt's burn director, "I don't know if we will have a burn unit five or 10 years from now." Across the state line, the Mississippi Firefighters Memorial Burn Center suspended new admissions in May and may need to shut down permanently. Part of the reason: the financial strain from treating meth-lab burn patients.
http://www.msnbc.msn.../site/newsweek/

I don't have any problem with signing a log book at a pharmacy, but Oregon's law requiring a prescription for cold medicine is perhaps too strict.

#15 of 22 Garrett Lundy

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Posted August 01 2005 - 01:18 PM

Isn't this easily overcome by stopping at each of the 15 drug stores every town seems to have now?
"Did you know that more people are murdered at 92 degrees Fahrenheit than any other temperature? I read an article once. Lower temperatures, people are easy-going, over 92 and it's too hot to move, but just 92, people get irritable."

#16 of 22 ChrisMatson

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Posted August 01 2005 - 02:57 PM

Isn't this easily overcome by stopping at each of the 15 drug stores every town seems to have now?
Yes.
Iowa wants to start a state-wide database of pseudoephedrine purchases to keep track of this.
There is a struggle to ensure protection of privacy while clamping down on an epidemic.
I think a national database is a good idea.

#17 of 22 David Williams

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Posted August 01 2005 - 08:17 PM

Quote:
Isn't this easily overcome by stopping at each of the 15 drug stores every town seems to have now?

I imagine the idea is that your average meth-head isn't gonna go to that much trouble because the quantities purchasable are so small... which the statistics seem to bear out. OK, where I live, just closed this loophole though, by creating a linked database. The federal version of the law being discussed would also have this provision.

Quote:
In Oklahoma the number of meth labs have dropped approximately in half after our version of this law was passed.

It was actually more impressive that that. We had a 80% decrease in meth lab busts in the first year of the program.

I used to live in Sallisaw, pop. just under 9000, which had the second-highest crime rate in the state (OKC was #1), almost all of it due to drugs and arrests made on the mule corridor of 1-40, which bisects the southside of the city. In fact, at my old apt complex a meth lab was found 6 doors down, completely by accident, by a DHS worker making a surprise home visit. I was never so happy to move out of that hellhole of a town, I tell you.
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#18 of 22 Jeff Gatie

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Posted August 02 2005 - 01:38 AM

Quote:
Isn't this easily overcome by stopping at each of the 15 drug stores every town seems to have now?


That assumes the meth producers actually pay for their Sudafed. Don't forget the "behind the counter" status is not just to keep a record of purchases, it's to keep it from becoming eligible for the ol' "five finger discount".

The Northeast is not even a big meth area, but I've heard stories of shoplifters clearing out entire racks of cold medicine blister packs from supermarkets and drug stores around here.

#19 of 22 Jay Taylor

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Posted August 02 2005 - 05:01 AM

It was actually more impressive that that. We had a 80% decrease in meth lab busts in the first year of the program.


Glad to hear that David. The 50% number I mentioned was from a channel 4 (NBC) news report quite a while ago.

Isn't this easily overcome by stopping at each of the 15 drug stores every town seems to have now?


As I recall from the news reports on pharmacies being busted for selling massive amounts of pseudoephedrine, they were selling hundreds or even thousands of boxes of the stuff to their "clients". I doubt if it's worth it to the meth lab producers to buy two boxes at a time.

Regardless of our opinion of the law the statistics speak for themselves. Pass the law and the number of meth labs in your state will be drastically reduced.
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#20 of 22 Chris Lockwood

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Posted August 02 2005 - 05:06 PM

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