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Onkyo TX-NR801 what seems to be the problem?

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by DarrenB, Sep 8, 2004.

  1. DarrenB

    DarrenB Member

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    I have been experiencing extremely high temperatures on my Onkyo TX-NR801 reciever and am wondering if anyone else has this problem. I have made sure that the speaker Ohms are set correctly and have made sure there is adequate ventilation but it still gets blazing hot.

    Blazing hot by the way means I cannot place my hand on top of the receiver for more that about 1 or 2 seconds. I called Onkyo today and they gave the impression that this was normal and as long as it did not thermal overload that I would be OK. This really wasn't an acceptable answer but I figured I would at least see what someone else may have experienced. I would appreciate feedback from any other TX-NR801 owners as well as Onkyo owners in general.

    Thanks

    Darren Bailey
     
  2. Tom Camlioglu

    Tom Camlioglu Well-Known Member

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    Try switching the speaker impedance in setup to 4 ohms (regardless of your speakers).

    I've done this on my Integra DTR8.3 and it's a huge difference in heat output.
     
  3. Rob Kramer

    Rob Kramer Well-Known Member

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    What speakers are you driving?
    4-ohm?
    Full-range?
    7.1?
     
  4. Bob_Hitson

    Bob_Hitson Active Member

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    I agree. Setting the impedance to 4 ohms will make it run much cooler.

    I even see a difference at 4 vs 6 ohms using it as a processor w/o directly attached speakers.
     
  5. DarrenB

    DarrenB Member

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    Thanks guys I'll try that if you don't think it'll hurt my 8 Ohm speakers. Let me know.

    My setup:

    Samsung HLN467W
    Onkyo TX-NR801
    Sony 715 DVD
    Athena AS-F2 Mains (8 Ohm)
    Klipsch KG 3.5 Rears (6 Ohm)
    Using Samsung as Center for now.
     
  6. Tom Camlioglu

    Tom Camlioglu Well-Known Member

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    I'm driving 8 ohm Energy speakers. Don't let the ohm thing get to you as many speakers rated at 8 ohm can dip well below that.
     
  7. Bob_Hitson

    Bob_Hitson Active Member

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    Darren,

    Did that make a difference in generated heat for you?
     
  8. DarrenB

    DarrenB Member

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    Yes, it made a big difference. Thanks to everyone for the recommendations.
     
  9. SteveCoug

    SteveCoug Active Member

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    Darren,

    I have the NR-801 and you are right, it does get HOT.

    But that is normal.

    You should NOT be putting anything on top of your amplifer (like your hand) ... and give it LOTS of air.

    Why do you need to cool it down?

    Put it on a shelf with several inches of air space above it and then don't touch it! ;-)
     
  10. Kernel X

    Kernel X Member

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    Your best bet would be to set it back to the 8 ohm setting because setting to the 4 ohm setting just limits your power output.(not good) Get yourself a nice, quiet little fan and place it behind your receiver. You can plug it in to the back of the receiver so when you power it up it comes on also. Good luck!
     
  11. Tom Camlioglu

    Tom Camlioglu Well-Known Member

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    While what KernelX states is true, in terms of real world effect - you more than likely will never encounter a situation where your receiver will belly up on power to the speakers unless you really like to CRANK it to '11' :wink:

    Check out the similar question at Secrets:http://hometheaterhifi.com/forum/showthread.php?t=586

    where the moderator states (on the 4 ohm switch):

    "Lower tap, lower rail voltage, more continuous current capacity. That means less power available at higher impedances, more power available at lower impedances. Since 8 ohm speakers often drop to near 4 ohms, it might be a good idea to go for the 4 ohm setting regardless, as it'll minimize sag in the power supply at any level, though because you don't actually change filter capacitance..."

    It's up to you ... switching to 4ohm won't hurt anything.
     
  12. Bob_Hitson

    Bob_Hitson Active Member

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    Why???

    All switching to 4 ohm mode does is lower the output volume to compensate for any increased load.

    Most speakers dip to 4 ohms (and lower) anyway, and the 801's guide states that if one speaker dips to 4 ohms, use the 4 ohm setting.

    As long as Darren can reach reference, or a volume level he's comfortable with; without distorting, there's nothing wrong with using a 4 ohm setting. Plus less heat may even increase the life of the components.
     

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