Join Brian Dobbs and Sam Posten as they talk about titles in their collection that they now wonder why they spent actual money on.

Published by

Brian Dobbs

member,editor

Sam Posten

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Oct 30, 1997
Messages
28,486
Location
Aberdeen, MD & Navesink, NJ
Real Name
Sam Posten
I wasn't sure we could make a compelling show out of this topic at first but maaaaan we had a lot of fun talking about the stinkers we have in our library and the worst movies we have ever seen. @Brian Dobbs brings out the best in me!

For me the worst movie is Waiting for Guffman. What's the worst thing you've ever seen???
 
  • Like
Reactions: Todd Erwin

JohnRice

Film Editor
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2000
Messages
13,006
Location
A Mile High
Real Name
John
I have a feeling that a lot of Sam's faves would fall into my "stinker" category.

And vice versa. :banana::dancing-banana-04::rock:

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, for example.

Any guesses whose stinker and whose cherished piles that one goes in?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Sam Posten

Brian Dobbs

Ambassador
Joined
Jul 1, 2001
Messages
1,145
Location
Maryland
Real Name
Brian Dobbs
  • Like
Reactions: Sam Posten

Josh Steinberg

Film Editor
Reviewer
Joined
Jun 10, 2003
Messages
18,609
Real Name
Josh Steinberg
I don't have the capability of listening to podcasts at this moment, but wanted to comment on the following, which is something I've been thinking a lot about lately:

whether having bad titles in a digital collection is as bad as having them sitting on a shelf.
I think the first question here is, how you define "bad". If "bad" simply means, "title that I get enjoyment from that is not appreciated by critics and/or the general public," I don't see any issue at all. Sometimes we like things that go against the grain.

But if "bad" in this context means, "title I didn't enjoy that I have no desire to revisit," having a digital copy you can't get rid of ends up being more clutter. I've yet to figure out if there's a way to remove an unwanted title from iTunes/Vudu/MoviesAnywhere/Ultraviolet. Over the years, as different services have sprung up and offered different perks for joining, I've gotten a bunch of free titles, and it turns out that I disliked a few of them. I'll never watch them again, and yet, they're still there in my digital locker. On the one hand, it's not taking up and shelf space, but it's just something else to be responsible for and to sort through. It makes browsing through one's digital library a bit clunky, because the titles I don't want are taking up just as much screen real estate as titles I do want. It's cluttered and inelegant, and it can make it harder to choose something to watch when I'm faced with options I'd rather not have in the first place.

But I didn't always think that way. I used to be more along the lines of "the more the merrier" and I felt strongly that I was doing some kind of civic duty all these years by collecting titles (both physically and digitally) that ultimately was more about reflecting what I had seen rather than what I liked, or reflecting that I had knowledge of film history rather than reflecting which historical films were enjoyable to me.

Over the past year or two, it's like a switch has flipped in my head, and I'm no longer interested in being a repository of everything that exists, or everything I've ever come in contact with. I now simply want to collect things that I enjoy and that I might want to revisit. And having a digital collection with titles that don't fall into that category just gets in the way of what I'm trying to do.

(As a sidenote to this, I've been converting a lot of DVDs that I still had to digital formats - when you can go from a non-anamorphic DVD copy of something like Field Of Dreams to a 4K UHD stream for just $5, that's a no-brainer. Major upgrade on the quality of the content, wallet savings, and shelf space saving, that's a clean win. But I've also looked long and hard at DVDs that simply haven't been touched in 10, 15 or even 20 years. Is it really worth buying a digital copy, even if it's only $5, for a movie I haven't touched in 20 years? I've decided in many cases to simply get rid of the DVD, and wait to see if I ever get the urge to see the film again, rather than needing to have the content upgraded before being willing to get rid of the DVD. While I wouldn't call all of these "bad movies," it was a similar dilemma - why pay money now for something I'm not planning to use?)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Sam Posten

Brian Dobbs

Ambassador
Joined
Jul 1, 2001
Messages
1,145
Location
Maryland
Real Name
Brian Dobbs
Over the past year or two, it's like a switch has flipped in my head, and I'm no longer interested in being a repository of everything that exists, or everything I've ever come in contact with.
Right, definitely with you here.

when you can go from a non-anamorphic DVD copy of something like Field Of Dreams to a 4K UHD stream for just $5, that's a no-brainer
Totally. FoD non-anamorphic DVD sucks!