Categories: A Few Words About

A few words about…™ Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri — in 4k UHD Blu-ray

Fox is doing a superb job with their 4k UHD releases, and this one fooled me.

Finished as a 2k DI, TBOE,M, at least to my eye, looks like true 4k. And that speaks volumes about Ben Davis’ cinematography.

Details are so meticulously presented — and I’m referring to dashboard instrumentation inside vehicles at night, as shot from outside in a MS, and leaves on trees — that I’m inclined to disbelieve what’s published on line.

I don’t have to relate the information that this a superb film, with spectacular performances, as that point has already been made.

Written and directed by Martin McDonagh, TBOE,M is extremely dark, with touches of character-driven humor. It’s a wonderfully multi-layered work, that almost seems like a Coen production, although I’m unable to come up with any direct connection.

But that 4k UHD Blu-ray mit delicately handled HDR…

Beyond anything that I’ve thus far seen in any uprez.

Audio is wonderfully proscenium filling.

It’s a film that deserves to be seen large, especially in 4k.

As an aside, and oriented toward those with a predilection for slipcovers…

I normally find them a waste of paper, and add to our planetary waste cycles.

But this one is beautifully designed, in its own way, a tiny work of art, and worth retaining.

Bottom line. For anyone considering purchasing the Blu-ray. I suggest against it. Go for future proofing, with 4k.

Image – 5 (Reference Quality)

Audio – 5 (DTS-HD MA 5.1)

Pass / Fail – Pass

Very Highly Recommended

RAH

Kevin Collins

View Comments

  • Robert Crawford

    Please enlighten us to the missing point?

    Well, I guess one point is (to remind myself) not to respond to a thread that needs longer explanation using your iPad, which you hate to type extensive stuff on, and usually end up being too brief and misunderstood.

    But, missing the point of this movie specifically, and *A* point of movies in general. When you watch a movie, you're asking someone to tell you a story. I just don't understand having the limitation of "Expecting it to play out in a certain fashion" from the beginning, and if it doesn't turn out that way, you'll hate it or "If there's a detail I don't like at the beginning, I'll just shut myself of from it to begin with." I don't think it's valid to call that an opinion, because you've never given time for a valuable opinion to be developed, based on the entire story instead of initial impressions.

    To specifically address the second one, Dixon's problems go far beyond race, which should be pretty obvious from the beginning, and glaringly obvious by the middle. That's a critical part of the story that's being told.

    Regarding some other things, again, I don't understand asking someone to tell you a story, and then not letting them tell their story, instead of yours. When something happens, what is the point to saying "Nobody would ever do that. This movie sucks." The people who created the movie put more time and effort into it than we do, especially when we're only 15 minutes into it. I'm not even arguing a matter of the opinion of the movie, but how the opinion is developed. Instead of saying "Nobody would do that" and completely wasting your time being shut off to the rest of the movie, maybe you could say "I wonder why she did that?" and then let the story answer your question. I think Mark Booth's explanation is on target, but you have no chance of knowing that when it happens. It was just clear from Red's reaction that it worked. Before she throws the money on the desk, he's not taking her seriously, but after she does, he's taking her very seriously.

    I'm just surprised to see this much opposition to letting a movie tell its story, in a forum whose ultimate goal is watching movies. I don't want anyone to come in defending it as their opinion. That's not what I'm talking about. Maybe instead you can answer the question, "Why are you putting so much effort and expense into watching movies when you view them in such a limited way?"

    Then maybe we can return the thread to Mr. Harris.

  • Here's an irony for our John Wayne icon posting friend who says he walked out on the film... I watched the documentary on the making of the film included on the blu-ray, and in an interview with Frances McDormand she says she is a huge fan of the John Ford westerns, and that her stoic and tough performance in this film was based on... John Wayne.

  • Hollywoodaholic

    Here's an irony for our John Wayne icon posting friend who says he walked out on the film... I watched the documentary on the making of the film included on the blu-ray, and in an interview with Frances McDormand she says she is a huge fan of the John Ford westerns, and that her stoic and tough performance in this film was based on... John Wayne.

    Yeah, I saw that documentary too, but, forgot to mention it yesterday. As I looked at her walk again in this film, I can see the John Wayne imitation.

  • Hollywoodaholic

    Here's an irony for our John Wayne icon posting friend who says he walked out on the film... I watched the documentary on the making of the film included on the blu-ray, and in an interview with Frances McDormand she says she is a huge fan of the John Ford westerns, and that her stoic and tough performance in this film was based on... John Wayne.

    Even before I watched that program, I thought "Searchers" felt like an inspiration/influence for the movie...

  • The western showdown style music every time she stalked toward the police station must have been a nod, as well.

  • Frances McDormand has been a favorite actress of mine since Blood Simple. Now that I know she's a big John Wayne fan, she will remain so forever. I don't know many women that are John Wayne fans, particularly actresses of today. To paraphrase Walter Brennan in To Have and Have Not, "you're alright, lady".:)

  • JohnRice

    Well, I guess one point is (to remind myself) not to respond to a thread that needs longer explanation using your iPad, which you hate to type extensive stuff on, and usually end up being too brief and misunderstood.

    But, missing the point of this movie specifically, and *A* point of movies in general. When you watch a movie, you're asking someone to tell you a story. I just don't understand having the limitation of "Expecting it to play out in a certain fashion" from the beginning, and if it doesn't turn out that way, you'll hate it or "If there's a detail I don't like at the beginning, I'll just shut myself of from it to begin with." I don't think it's valid to call that an opinion, because you've never given time for a valuable opinion to be developed, based on the entire story instead of initial impressions.

    To specifically address the second one, Dixon's problems go far beyond race, which should be pretty obvious from the beginning, and glaringly obvious by the middle. That's a critical part of the story that's being told.

    Regarding some other things, again, I don't understand asking someone to tell you a story, and then not letting them tell their story, instead of yours. When something happens, what is the point to saying "Nobody would ever do that. This movie sucks." The people who created the movie put more time and effort into it than we do, especially when we're only 15 minutes into it. I'm not even arguing a matter of the opinion of the movie, but how the opinion is developed. Instead of saying "Nobody would do that" and completely wasting your time being shut off to the rest of the movie, maybe you could say "I wonder why she did that?" and then let the story answer your question. I think Mark Booth's explanation is on target, but you have no chance of knowing that when it happens. It was just clear from Red's reaction that it worked. Before she throws the money on the desk, he's not taking her seriously, but after she does, he's taking her very seriously.

    I'm just surprised to see this much opposition to letting a movie tell its story, in a forum whose ultimate goal is watching movies. I don't want anyone to come in defending it as their opinion. That's not what I'm talking about. Maybe instead you can answer the question, "Why are you putting so much effort and expense into watching movies when you view them in such a limited way?"

    Then maybe we can return the thread to Mr. Harris.

    What nonsense. Just because I could not enjoy a film that you liked, I have a problem with not letting the story play out as the writer liked it to go? I'm sorry to keep checking in on this thread, and to derail Roberts review. This is my last posting here. Really sorry to let you all know the film was not for me. You can all go on now of patting yourself on the back about it.

  • I never said I liked the movie. That's entirely an assumption based solely on my expressing the need to understand it before assessing it's value. Otherwise, an opinion isn't really worth anything. I really want to emphasize this, I never said I liked the movie or any of the choices. I just think it's important to try to understand the choices before you can even begin to assess them.

    I watched it a second time this weekend, and the truth is, I'm fairly lukewarm about it.

    To be honest Jim, the full and exact quote you gave for not liking the film was "Just expressing my opinion of not liking the film. I went into it thinking it would be played out in a certain fashion, but I was mistaken." That clearly expresses "have(ing) a problem with not letting the story play out as the writer liked it to go" as opposed to what you expected before the movie even started. I can't see how I'm misunderstanding the explanation for disliking it.

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