Will Kino be Paramount in finally bringing much wanted films to Blu?

3 Stars

With the announcement of an obscure Paramount film with Marcello Mastroianni and the just as obscure 80s John Huston film Phobia..it seems Kino has a Paramount deal. There are many Paramount films that escaped DVD release only appearing on VHS( Phobia) and others never even getting a VHS release (Mastroianni film) . Can this bode well for Looking For Mr Goodbar and Citizens Band finally getting much needed releases as they were important films of the 70s. And where are the Blus of Ordinary People and The Elephant Man? Which other Paramount films would you like to see? Burt Reynolds Rough Cut and Paternity also come to mind

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Kevin Collins

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80 Comments

  1. Does Paramount have a deal with Kino or is this just an assumption? Anyway, I'll play the game. But I'll leave the list of usual suspects that are repeated over and over (Ordinary People, Roman Holiday, Elephant Man, Place In The Sun, Greatest Show On Earth, Dragonslayer, War Of The Worlds blah, blah, blah) to others. I'd like to see more obscure Paramount titles that have never legitimately seen the light of day on DVD like:

    Amorous Adventures Of Moll Flanders (Kim Novak, Angela Lansbury)
    Beau James (Bob Hope, Vera Miles)
    Birds And The Bees (David Niven, Mitzi Gaynor)
    Bliss Of Mrs. Blossom (Shirley MacLaine, Richard Attenborough)
    Buster Keaton Story (Donald O'Connor, Ann Blyth)
    But Not For Me (Clark Gable, Carroll Baker)
    Career (Dean Martin, Shirley MacLaine)
    Connecting Rooms (Bette Davis, Michael Redgrave)
    Five Branded Women (Jeanne Moreau, Silvana Mangano)
    Girl Rush (Rosalind Russell, Fernando Lamas)
    Hell's Island (John Payne, Mary Murphy)
    Here Come The Girls (Bob Hope, Rosemary Clooney)
    Hot Spell (Shirley Booth, Anthony Quinn)
    Jamaica Run (Ray Milland, Arlene Dahl)
    Joker Is Wild (Frank Sinatra, Jeanne Crain)
    Judith (Sophia Loren, Peter Finch)
    Let's Dance (Fred Astaire, Betty Hutton)
    Lucy Gallant (Charlton Heston, Jane Wyman)
    My Six Loves (Debbie Reynolds, Cliff Robertson)
    Oh Dad Poor Dad (Rosalind Russell, Robert Morse)
    Pleasure Of His Company (Fred Astaire, Debbie Reynolds)
    Proud And The Profane (William Holden, Deborah Kerr)
    Rat Race (Tony Curtis, Debbie Reynolds)
    September Affair (Joan Fontaine, Joseph Cotten)
    Sylvia (Carroll Baker, George Maharis)
    That Certain Feeling (Bob Hope, Eva Marie Saint)
    That Kind Of Woman (Sophia Loren, Tab Hunter)
    Thunder In The East (Alan Ladd, Deborah Kerr)
    Thunder In The Sun (Susan Hayward, Jeff Chandler)
    Who's Been Sleeping In My Bed (Dean Martin, Carol Burnett)
    Wild Is The Wind (Anna Magnani, Anthony Quinn)

  2. Thomas T

    Does Paramount have a deal with Kino or is this just an assumption? Anyway, I'll play the game. But I'll leave the list of usual suspects that are repeated over and over (Ordinary People, Roman Holiday, Elephant Man, Place In The Sun, Greatest Show On Earth, Dragonslayer, War Of The Worlds blah, blah, blah) to others. I'd like to see more obscure Paramount titles that have never legitimately seen the light of day on DVD like:

    Amorous Adventures Of Moll Flanders (Kim Novak, Angela Lansbury)
    Beau James (Bob Hope, Vera Miles)
    Birds And The Bees (David Niven, Mitzi Gaynor)
    Bliss Of Mrs. Blossom (Shirley MacLaine, Richard Attenborough)
    Buster Keaton Story (Donald O'Connor, Ann Blyth)
    But Not For Me (Clark Gable, Carroll Baker)
    Career (Dean Martin, Shirley MacLaine)
    Connecting Rooms (Bette Davis, Michael Redgrave)
    Five Branded Women (Jeanne Moreau, Silvana Mangano)
    Girl Rush (Rosalind Russell, Fernando Lamas)
    Hell's Island (John Payne, Mary Murphy)
    Hot Spell (Shirley Booth, Anthony Quinn)
    Jamaica Run (Ray Milland, Arlene Dahl)
    Joker Is Wild (Frank Sinatra, Jeanne Crain)
    Judith (Sophia Loren, Peter Finch)
    Let's Dance (Fred Astaire, Betty Hutton)
    Lucy Gallant (Charlton Heston, Jane Wyman)
    My Six Loves (Debbie Reynolds, Cliff Robertson)
    Oh Dad Poor Dad (Rosalind Russell, Robert Morse)
    Pleasure Of His Company (Fred Astaire, Debbie Reynolds)
    Proud And The Profane (William Holden, Deborah Kerr)
    Rat Race (Tony Curtis, Debbie Reynolds)
    September Affair (Joan Fontaine, Joseph Cotten)
    Sylvia (Carroll Baker, George Maharis)
    That Certain Feeling (Bob Hope, Eva Marie Saint)
    That Kind Of Woman (Sophia Loren, Tab Hunter)
    Thunder In The East (Alan Ladd, Deborah Kerr)
    Thunder In The Sun (Susan Hayward, Jeff Chandler)
    Who's Been Sleeping In My Bed (Dean Martin, Carol Burnett)

    A deal with Kino can't be anything but good for Paramount, as Kino wastes no time spewing out titles at a rate far exceeding that of any other company. Plus, lately, it has undertaken to come up with new commentaries for the vast majority of them. Have you received one of their catalogs recently? It's as thick as a Sears Roebuck, and almost all the titles therein have accumulated during only the past five years!

  3. Robert Crawford

    Kino is releasing Republic titles controlled by Paramount Home Video.

    Yes, and the Kino Insider posted that once the Republic titles have been restored and released on Blu-ray disc, Paramount will proceed with their own titles including several in Vista Vision!

    Thomas: very good list. I'd buy most of those titles.

  4. Unreleased Paramount-controlled titles in Region A / Region 1? Sign me up for:

    American Hot Wax (1978, Tim McIntire, Fran Drescher, Jay Leno) –except that it's a music rights nightmare
    Back from the Dead (1957, Peggie Castle, Arthur Franz) – Regal Films, originally with Fox
    Beware, My Lovely (1952, Ida Lupino, Robert Ryan) – Republic library
    Bliss of Mrs. Blossom, The (1968, Shirley MacLaine, James Booth, Richard Attenborough)
    Blood and Roses (1960, Mel Ferrer, Elsa Martinelli)
    Cheaters, The (1945, Joseph Schildkraut, Billie Burke, Eugene Pallette) – Republic library
    Crosswinds (1951, John Payne, Rhonda Fleming)
    Fear Is the Key (1972, Barry Newman, Suzy Kendall, John Vernon)
    Fraulein Doktor (1969, Suzy Kendall, Kenneth More, Nigel Green, Capucine)
    Gang War (1958, Charles Bronson) – Regal Films, originally with Fox
    Gunn
    (1967, Craig Stevens, Laura Devon, Ed Asner, Sherry Jackson)
    Hell's Island (1955, John Payne, Mary Murphy)
    Hong Kong (1952, Ronald Reagan, Rhonda Fleming)
    It Came from Hollywood (1982, Dan Ackroyd, John Candy, Cheech & Chong, Gilda Radner) –another rights nightmare
    Last Outpost, The (1951 aka Cavalry Charge, Ronald Reagan, Rhonda Fleming)
    Only When I Larf (1968, Richard Attenborough, David Hemmings)
    Past Tense (1994, Scott Glenn, Lara Flynn Boyle, Anthony LaPaglia) – Republic library
    Redhead and the Cowboy, The (1951, Glenn Ford, Rhonda Fleming, Edmond O'Brien)
    Secret of the Incas (1954, Charlton Heston, Robert Young)
    Space Master X-7 (1958, Bill Williams, Lyn Thomas, Paul Frees) – Regal Films, originally with Fox
    Swinger, The (1966, Ann-Margret, Tony Franciosa)
    Thunder in the Sun (Jeff Chandler, Susan Hayward)
    Tropic Zone (1953, Ronald Reagan, Rhonda Fleming)
    Touch of Larceny, A (1960, James Mason, George Sanders, Vera Miles)
    Unknown Terror, The (1957, John Howard, Mala Powers, Paul Richards) – Regal Films, originally with Fox
    Unman, Wittering and Zigo (1971, David Hemmings)
    Where's Jack? (1969, Stanley Baker, Tommy Steele)

  5. Paramount (other than with Criterion) does not license titles they have already released on DVD. The titles Kino (and Olive) are titles they have not had releases except perhaps VHS or some cases never. They also have been releasing many Republic titles. There are rights issues for certain titles; Looking for Mr. Goodbar, Little Darlings, American Hot Wax, Citizen’s Band, First Love and others that hold up having them released on Blu-ray and DVD. I doubt we will ever see these titles in the near future. Making lists may be fun but ultimately these titles are not within Kino’s reach.

  6. BRAD1963

    Paramount (other than with Criterion) does not license titles they have already released on DVD. The titles Kino (and Olive) are titles they have not had releases except perhaps VHS or some cases never. They also have been releasing many Republic titles. There are rights issues for certain titles; Looking for Mr. Goodbar, Little Darlings, American Hot Wax, Citizen’s Band, First Love and others that hold up having them released on Blu-ray and DVD. I doubt we will ever see these titles in the near future. Making lists may be fun but ultimately these titles are not within Kino’s reach.

    That’s where you are wrong. They ARE within KINO’s reach; they just have to convince Paramount to allow them to be licensed. If Criterion could do it with Warner’s, then they could very well do it too.

  7. Robert Crawford

    Kino is releasing Republic titles controlled by Paramount Home Video.

    Seeing how well WB handled the Popeye cartoons makes me pine for similar treatment of the Fleischer and Famous cartoons Republic holds. Most of them haven't even been touched since the 80s.

    Kino does well with animation. They're well on their way of finishing up The Pink Panther and related shorts. It'd be a good match.

  8. battlebeast

    That’s where you are wrong. They ARE within KINO’s reach; they just have to convince Paramount to allow them to be licensed. If Criterion could do it with Warner’s, then they could very well do it too.

    It is not that easy. Not to say it could not happen in the future, but I would not count on it. Paramount has no interest in making these types of deals. I think our only hope is they begin releasing MOD titles like WAC, Sony and Universal have been doing to keep catalog titles on the market. Otherwise I think we are SOL on getting many Paramount titles on Blu-ray disc.

  9. ahollis

    While I can not say who told me, but yes, they have no interest at the present. The person that told me is involved with Paramount.

    Well that stinks. Good to know another studio wants their films to rot in a vault. Good to know!

  10. battlebeast

    Well that stinks. Good to know another studio wants their films to rot in a vault. Good to know!

    I understand your disappointment, but Paramount not releasing their catalog doesn't mean their films are rotting in their vaults as Paramount has a robust restoration program.

  11. …and Paramount just released two of their classics (War of the Worlds and It’s A Wonderful Life) in new 4K restorations through digital retailers. It seems that they’re putting their efforts to digital releases rather than physical, but not actually abandoning their catalog.

  12. Robert Crawford

    I understand your disappointment, but Paramount not releasing their catalog doesn't mean their films are rotting in their vaults as Paramount has a robust restoration program.

    I guess that was the wrong choice of words…

  13. Robert Crawford

    I understand your disappointment, but Paramount not releasing their catalog doesn't mean their films are rotting in their vaults as Paramount has a robust restoration program.

    But what does it matter if they don’t release them? It’s ALWAYS a great idea to preserve the classics. It’s of PARAMOUNT importance (lul)! Restore and remaster. But if you won’t release them… :/

  14. battlebeast

    But what does it matter if they don’t release them? It’s ALWAYS a great idea to preserve the classics. It’s of PARAMOUNT importance (lul)! Restore and remaster. But if you won’t release them… :/

    Because otherwise the film elements turn to dust. Also, those of us that can stream without any issues in the States can enjoy these restorations just fine.

  15. Robert Crawford

    Because otherwise the film elements turn to dust. Also, those of us that can stream without any issues in the States can enjoy these restorations just fine.

    Yah, well not everyone lives in the usa. and not everyone likes to stream. I like physical media. I have great collection and I’d like to complete it.

    I know full well the benefits of restoration; but releasing them only to stream in ONE COUNTRY when there are companies who would LOVE to release physical copies of their product and pay them to do so is beyond silly and kind of unfair. Kino, TT, Criterion, Olive etc., they’d all Find titles they’d love to release.

  16. battlebeast

    Yah, well not everyone lives in the usa. and not everyone likes to stream. I like physical media. I have great collection and I’d like to complete it.

    I know full well the benefits of restoration; but releasing them only to stream in ONE COUNTRY when there are companies who would LOVE to release physical copies of their product and pay them to do so is beyond silly and kind of unfair. Kino, TT, Criterion, Olive etc., they’d all Find titles they’d love to release.

    And not everyone CAN stream, certainly not in HD or UHD quality. Verizon Wireless is inadequate even for SD.

  17. BRAD1963

    It is not that easy. Not to say it could not happen in the future, but I would not count on it. Paramount has no interest in making these types of deals. I think our only hope is they begin releasing MOD titles like WAC, Sony and Universal have been doing to keep catalog titles on the market. Otherwise I think we are SOL on getting many Paramount titles on Blu-ray disc.

    I think another hope might be if Paramount manages to hire another person like Peter Staddon, their Home Entertainment guru of fifteen years ago. He was like George Feltenstein, and had a passion for classic films. Sometimes a simple regime change can open a lot of doors that we had were irrevocably shut. Staddon's departure from PHE was the death knell with regards to any studio enthusiasm for home video release of catalog titles, but the reverse could also happen. Unlikely, I know, but…
    :unsure:

  18. Dick

    I think another hope might be if Paramount manages to hire another person like Peter Staddon, their Home Entertainment guru of fifteen years ago. He was like George Feltenstein, and had a passion for classic films. Sometimes a simple regime change can open a lot of doors that we had were irrevocably shut. Staddon's departure from PHE was the death knell with regards to any studio enthusiasm for home video release of catalog titles, but the reverse could also happen. Unlikely, I know, but…
    :unsure:

    I am happy Peter Staddon is being recognized for what he was.

    I can't speak for him, but I think many from Fox left because they were no longer allowed to play in their sandbox anymore. I know that Fox was at its most innovative while Peter and his crew were there.

    Sadly, we don't hear from Peter anymore.

  19. Ronald Epstein

    I am happy Peter Staddon is being recognized for what he was.

    I can't speak for him, but I think many from Fox left because they were no longer allowed to play in their sandbox anymore. I know that Fox was at its most innovative while Peter and his crew were there.

    Sadly, we don't hear from Peter anymore.

    No, he was quite vocal on this forum for years. Was he also with Fox as well as Paramount?

  20. Robert Crawford

    Yes, they were and treated us well during our Meets.

    Well, at least Fox is still providing nice source materials for niche companies to release on Blu-ray. Hardly anything from Paramount. I mean, geese, they have this 4k restoration of WAR OF THE WORLDS all set to go, but, like Netflix-made films, they're holding them hostage for streaming only. Call it an inevitable business move in our current climate if you will…I call it treason.

  21. Dick

    Well, at least Fox is still providing nice source materials for niche companies to release on Blu-ray. Hardly anything from Paramount. I mean, geese, they have this 4k restoration of WAR OF THE WORLDS all set to go, but, like Netflix-made films, they're holding them hostage for streaming only. Call it an inevitable business move in our current climate if you will…I call it treason.

    Well that's a different argument as the people running Paramount back then are long gone.

  22. Dick

    Well, at least Fox is still providing nice source materials for niche companies to release on Blu-ray. Hardly anything from Paramount. .

    I've recently bought three Blu-ray discs sourced from Paramount; A Man Alone, Lisbon and The Last Command.

  23. Robert Crawford

    Paramount has a robust restoration program.

    To what end? If a was a Viacom stockholder, I'd object to Paramount throwing money down a rat hole. Expenditures with no plans for revenues from the assets being preserved.

  24. At the moment, they seem to be experimenting with debuting their new restorations on digital platforms like iTunes and Vudu. They've just releases brand new, state of the art 4K restorations of The War Of The Worlds and It's A Wonderful Life on those services. There's also a new 4K DCP of It's A Wonderful Life that's available to repertory bookings.

    It seems to me that they are trying to monetize the content and actively seeking revenue streams for it. But I can understand their reluctance to release a disc. At present time, physical media sales of catalog titles are way down; a typical catalog title can only be counted on to sell hundreds of copies, maybe a couple thousand if it's a high demand title. It may be that Paramount has decided that it's not worth the time and expense to do that. The cost of authoring the discs, replicating them, distributing them to retailers, and then accepting returns for unsold product, and having to them store or dispose of that product, may be more than the profit that it could reasonably be expected to generate. Or, it could be that doing so would yield them only the tiniest of profits – perhaps enough for a smaller label like Twilight Time or Kino to get by on, but not enough to justify the effort for Paramount. On the other hand, the digital releases carry no authoring or replication costs, and the only distribution cost is the expense of sending a hard drive with the data file on it to the digital services.

    From a stockholder point of view, a shareholder might reasonably ask why Paramount would put the effort into releasing a disc that will sell a small number of copies, when there's a greater profit margin and greater audience demand for the digital version.

  25. Sure. And they are in the process of doing that. At present date, though, they are only licensing out titles that they have never released on DVD before. There is nothing to suggest that they couldn't expand that agreement in the future if it works out well for them.

    My suspicion is that they're looking over their internal numbers for how much those titles they had previously released on DVD sold and trying to determine what the best path forward for those titles may be. Considering that two years ago, Paramount didn't really have a home video department at all, all of these baby steps strike me as encouraging signs. They're waking up from their slumber, looking at what the state of the world is, and trying to figure out what their best moves are.

  26. Josh Steinberg

    Sure. And they are in the process of doing that. At present date, though, they are only licensing out titles that they have never released on DVD before.

    Not true of the Criterion titles.

  27. True, I should have been more clear – I was referring to new licensing deals like the ones they've recently made with Kino.

    I wasn't aware that Criterion was currently releasing Paramount material, I thought it had been a while since they had licensed something out to them.

  28. Josh Steinberg

    At the moment, they seem to be experimenting with debuting their new restorations on digital platforms like iTunes and Vudu. They've just releases brand new, state of the art 4K restorations of The War Of The Worlds and It's A Wonderful Life on those services. There's also a new 4K DCP of It's A Wonderful Life that's available to repertory bookings.

    It seems to me that they are trying to monetize the content and actively seeking revenue streams for it. But I can understand their reluctance to release a disc. At present time, physical media sales of catalog titles are way down; a typical catalog title can only be counted on to sell hundreds of copies, maybe a couple thousand if it's a high demand title. It may be that Paramount has decided that it's not worth the time and expense to do that. The cost of authoring the discs, replicating them, distributing them to retailers, and then accepting returns for unsold product, and having to them store or dispose of that product, may be more than the profit that it could reasonably be expected to generate. Or, it could be that doing so would yield them only the tiniest of profits – perhaps enough for a smaller label like Twilight Time or Kino to get by on, but not enough to justify the effort for Paramount. On the other hand, the digital releases carry no authoring or replication costs, and the only distribution cost is the expense of sending a hard drive with the data file on it to the digital services.

    From a stockholder point of view, a shareholder might reasonably ask why Paramount would put the effort into releasing a disc that will sell a small number of copies, when there's a greater profit margin and greater audience demand for the digital version.

    Not everyone likes digital and streaming. I can’t put a stream of ORDINARY PEOPLE on my DVD rack, can I?

    And besides that, most streams are AMERICA ONLY, because lord knows the rest of the world shouldn’t be allowed to watch these films.

    If sales are lagging, go the MOD way and let people buy at their leisure.

    If they did a Blu MOD of ORDINARY PEOPLE, I’d snap it up in a heartbeat! And I know other here would buy It, too.

    Make it fair so EVERYONE can watch.

  29. battlebeast

    Not everyone likes digital and streaming. I can’t put a stream of ORDINARY PEOPLE on my DVD rack, can I?

    And besides that, most streams are AMERICA ONLY, because lord knows the rest of the world shouldn’t be allowed to watch these films.

    If sales are lagging, go the MOD way and let people buy at their leisure.

    If they did a Blu MOD of ORDINARY PEOPLE, I’d snap it up in a heartbeat! And I know other here would buy It, too.

    Make it fair so EVERYONE can watch.

    I understand your frustration, unfortunately, there's just not enough of us buying catalog titles to persuade the studios otherwise. It's the way it is, whether that's fair or not which isn't much different than just about everything in life.

  30. battlebeast

    Not everyone likes digital and streaming. I can’t put a stream of ORDINARY PEOPLE on my DVD rack, can I?

    I'm almost embarrassed to admit this, but I in fact do put stream purchases on my movie rack. I buy slim cases super cheap in bulk and print out the iTunes artwork so the they can sit on my shelf along side my Blu-rays and DVDs.
    There's another forum member who rips his iTunes purchases to BD-R. I really don't see the advantage to that as the BD-R won't be any better than the original stream or download, although I suppose you would have something should you ever go off-grid.

  31. ahollis

    While I can not say who told me, but yes, they have no interest at the present. The person that told me is involved with Paramount.

    A few years ago I also read that Paramount wanted to concentrate on releasing their newer films on video and were not planning on restoring the classics to Blu-ray, even though they have done so with a few like Sunset Blvd. I wrote to them requesting A Place in the Sun and Hud on Blu-ray but never got a response.

  32. filmnoirguy

    I wrote to them requesting A Place in the Sun and Hud on Blu-ray but never got a response.

    There's a 4K DCP of "A Place in the Sun" (and "Romeo and Juliet") making the rounds. If they're not going to release it on disc themselves or loan it out to a boutique label, hopefully they'll offer it as a digital download like they did with "It's a Wonderful Life".

  33. Josh Steinberg

    From a stockholder point of view, a shareholder might reasonably ask why Paramount would put the effort into releasing a disc that will sell a small number of copies, when there's a greater profit margin and greater audience demand for the digital version.

    Are the streaming/download versions really selling either though? Last I read those sales numbers were very low, and growing very slowly compared to expectations. I've read several articles that basically say people are switching to watching stuff included in their subscriptions, and maybe renting some others, but largely not buying movies anymore.

    From my perspective we're heading back to an 80's and 90's style "most people rent" system where purchasing and collecting movies is a niche collector's hobby, be it disc or digital.

  34. DalekFlay

    Are the streaming/download versions really selling either though? Last I read those sales numbers were very low, and growing very slowly compared to expectations. I've read several articles that basically say people are switching to watching stuff included in their subscriptions, and maybe renting some others, but largely not buying movies anymore.

    From my perspective we're heading back to an 80's and 90's style "most people rent" system where purchasing and collecting movies is a niche collector's hobby, be it disc or digital.

    https://geeks.media/the-paywall-will-be-the-death-of-streaming-as-we-know-it

    This article sums it up best…

    ~Ben

  35. That article is scary.

    I am a huge geek. The nerd of nerds. Am I going to pay an additional $5 or $10 for CBS’s crappy streaming service just to watch Star Trek? No I’m not. I will find another way to watch it.

    If a so-called huge geek isn’t willing to spend $5 to watch a new Star Trek series, and feels that the very act of being asked to pay for it entitles him to circumvent that process and entitles him to pirate the content – this is all over.

    I’ve said before and I’ll say it again – the biggest battle that content producers face in 2019 and beyond isn’t about getting customers to change their preferences from physical to streaming media – the biggest battle is simply getting people to pay for the content they consume.

    The entire entertainment ecosystem collapses when a critical mass of people decide they’re entitled to watch whatever they want without paying for it.

  36. Josh Steinberg

    If a so-called huge geek isn’t willing to spend $5 to watch a new Star Trek series, and feels that the very act of being asked to pay for it entitles him to circumvent that process and entitles him to pirate the content – this is all over.

    I’ve said before and I’ll say it again – the biggest battle that content producers face in 2019 and beyond isn’t about getting customers to change their preferences from physical to streaming media – the biggest battle is simply getting people to pay for the content they consume.

    The entire entertainment ecosystem collapses when a critical mass of people decide they’re entitled to watch whatever they want without paying for it.

    Yeah this is what I was getting at above. I think the concept of purchasing movies is under attack, more than just discs specifically. If you google sales information it is streaming subscriptions that put digital far ahead. Just looking at actual sales of movies discs still lead by a huge margin, but both are a minority.

    I don't agree with the guy in that article, but I do think a lot of people DO agree with him. Media has become so disposable at this point that only convenience seems to get most people to pay, and that has its limits with all these new services coming. I really do think most people will subscribe to one or two services and either ignore or pirate the rest, as he implies. Not saying I agree with that, but I think it is what it is.

  37. ClassicTVMan1981X

    https://geeks.media/the-paywall-will-be-the-death-of-streaming-as-we-know-it

    This article sums it up best…

    ~Ben

    I just woke up. This is one of the first articles I read and I am a little confused by it — probably because I am still sipping my coffee and firing up my brain in the process.

    I don't know what the article means by "paywall." I am presuming it's the price of streaming content.

    Here's my take on the streaming problem…

    At the end of December, I sold my stock in Netflix. It was a good run and I made some money. Netflix has done very well. The problem is, Disney is due to launch their own streaming service by this year's end. They are going to pull a lot of titles off of Netflix. Also, as the above-mentioned article has stated, Netflix has been running debt.

    I bought stock in Disney anticipating their streaming service and Star Wars parks would give them a huge bump.

    There are so many paid streaming services popping up. Each is stepping on one another with their own exclusive content and exclusive studio deals. Want Disney movies? You need Disney+. Want Warner classics? You need their service.

    Each of these services cost an average of $10 a month. Heck, I pay $14 for 4k Netflix. Start adding all these individual services up and put that on top of your cable bill and you are paying a pretty hefty fee each month for content.

    Piracy? The horse is out of the gate and running wild on that one. It's so easy to do — most everyone is doing it — and in a way, I understand why it's being done with movie theater prices and the costs of multiple streaming services.

    Something has got to give here. These "exclusive" services continue to pop up all over the place and no matter how much consumers are forced to pick and choose which one they want, they still lose out on getting all the content they want in the end.

  38. Ronald Epstein

    Something has got to give here. These "exclusive" services continue to pop up all over the place and no matter how much consumers are forced to pick and choose which one they want, they still lose out on getting all the content they want in the end.

    Streaming services are in the process of adopting the cable/dish business model. Tiered packages with the common junk in the lowest-price level and their exclusives, high-demand and niche offerings in the most expensive. In other words, everything you hated about cable/dish service and caused you to cut the cord. Plus now you'll have to get multiple services to get what you want, and probably wind up paying even more.

  39. Paul Penna

    Streaming services are in the process of adopting the cable/dish business model. Tiered packages with the common junk in the lowest-price level and their exclusives, high-demand and niche offerings in the most expensive. In other words, everything you hated about cable/dish service and caused you to cut the cord. Plus now you'll have to get multiple services to get what you want, and probably wind up paying even more.

    Yeah, I find it sadly amusing. In my area at least cable is only $30 more than high speed internet on its own, so once you subscribe to more than two streaming services you're paying more than cable. And of course we're killing the ownership market because services will want to keep their exclusives.

    It really bums me out if I think about it too long.

  40. Based on the fact that they've just debuted two new high-profile 4K restorations exclusively on digital media, it seems possible that Paramount is considering winding down their physical media output in favor of online distribution.

  41. Josh Steinberg

    Based on the fact that they've just debuted two new high-profile 4K restorations exclusively on digital media, it seems possible that Paramount is considering winding down their physical media output in favor of online distribution.

    Online still sells below discs, for movie purchasing, so that would be a weird strategy at the moment. They've released a good number of catalog UHDs too. I think it's more that they only release on BD and UHD the bigger stuff they think will sell. Been that way for a while.

    It's a Wonderful Life would sell, but they might be waiting for more casuals to own players and a future Christmas.

  42. DalekFlay

    Online still sells below discs, for movie purchasing, so that would be a weird strategy at the moment.

    Not necessarily. The profit margins on an all-digital release may be more favorable than a physical release that includes authoring and manufacturing costs, along with distribution costs, maintaining inventory and accepting returns for unsold merchandise.

  43. So in the world of streaming the costs are starting to mount, with subscription to multiple services becoming necessary. And that doesn't even count the price increases ISPs will eventually charge their highest users, which streamers of blu-ray and especially UHD are going to be.

    And studios would like to make disks go away while charging the same amount.

    Doesn't it seem like the studios are trying to kill their golden goose?

  44. Josh Steinberg

    Not necessarily. The profit margins on an all-digital release may be more favorable than a physical release that includes authoring and manufacturing costs, along with distribution costs, maintaining inventory and accepting returns for unsold merchandise.

    Which is why they might be selective in what comes to disc, sure, but it's not like Paramount are writing off discs. I've got a ton of Paramount UHDs that say otherwise. I just think they don't see much market for a 50's movie on the format. Hopefully they start licensing someday and a label does.

  45. Thomas T

    In answer to the original post, no! Kino has confirmed the deal with Paramount is over and there will be no more new Paramount titles. So much for the wish lists. 🙁

    Well, we still have Jivaro in 3D to be released in March.

  46. Rick Thompson

    So in the world of streaming the costs are starting to mount, with subscription to multiple services becoming necessary. And that doesn't even count the price increases ISPs will eventually charge their highest users, which streamers of blu-ray and especially UHD are going to be.

    And studios would like to make disks go away while charging the same amount.

    Doesn't it seem like the studios are trying to kill their golden goose?

    That's not true that it's necessary to have costly subscriptions to multiple services to stream movies.

  47. Thomas T

    In answer to the original post, no! Kino has confirmed the deal with Paramount is over and there will be no more new Paramount titles. So much for the wish lists. 🙁

    They may strike up a new deal with Paramount and Fox soon. Right now their plate is full with Universal, MGM, and Studio Canal titles.

  48. RBailey

    I'm also hoping for another Paramount-Kino deal. Would love to see more of their Republic restorations get a Blu-ray release.
    FAIR WIND TO JAVA
    THE OUTCAST
    THE PLUNDERERS
    HELLFIRE

    I'd love to see a restored Fair Wind To Java. I've yet to see a decent print of it.

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