What Americans think of streaming amid Apple TV+ launch

In light of the debut of its Apple TV+ subscription service two weeks ago, a new Morning Consult/The Hollywood Reporter survey reveals Americans’ opinions regarding streaming services and package bundles. The poll was conducted on March 14-18 among 2,201 adults before yesterday’s unveiling of Apple’s new streaming service.

The data from the poll reveals that most Americans said they were uninterested in Apple’s streaming service before yesterday’s launch. Americans were asked whether they would sign up for the TV and movie streaming service that Apple was rumored to be preparing at the time. While 55 percent of respondents said they own an Apple device, a 49 percent plurality of all adults said they are unlikely to subscribe to Apple’s new streaming service. Just three in 10 Americans indicated they are likely to purchase a subscription.There was, however, more interest among younger Americans with 44% of millennials saying they would be interested in the streaming service.

Meanwhile, according to other polling commissioned by Morning Consult/The Hollywood Reporter, Hulu and Spotify’s bundled price is well below what consumers would pay. An analysis using the Van Westendorp model, which determines an optimum price point for a good or service by considering what prices consumers believe are “too expensive” and “too good to be true,” found that for the TV/movies/music bundle, $16 was the optimum price.

Consumers generally liked the idea of bundling: 66 percent said they were likely to purchase a movie and TV streaming service that was bundled with a music streaming service, and 63 percent said the option to bundle multiple services under one account would make them more likely to subscribe to a streaming service. 

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Martin Dew

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24 Comments

  1. I think it's going to be an uphill battle for any new streaming service to make inroads with the big guns of Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime already well entrenched. They would need some major, popular exclusive titles in order to make much of a ripple in the streaming world.

  2. DaveF

    Meanwhile…
    “DVD and Blu-ray sales nearly halved over five years, MPAA report says | Ars Technica”

    And it looks like digital revenues are 3x physical revenues in the use as streaming rises and discs decline.

    https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/201…arly-halved-over-five-years-mpaa-report-says/

    My current discretionary spending has reflected that trend and will continue to do so as I'm running out of room with thousands of discs in my film library.

  3. I’ve probably purged 250+ discs over the last year. I no longer see the value in holding on to DVDs I purchased more than 15 years ago that haven’t been watched in 15 years if ever and still have no desire to watch.

    For years, I collected Disney “vault” titles that world frequently go out of print not because I felt an urgent need to watch them in that moment, but because I feared losing access to them if I one day did want to watch them. I have Disney movies I haven’t watched since the VHS era that I bought on DVD and didn’t watch, and then bought on BD and still didn’t watch.

    I’m ready to be off that treadmill.

    I am happy to keep the discs of Disney films that I have revisited more frequently, and those which are in a format (3D) that Disney+ doesn’t support. But maybe I don’t need to have copies of Disney movies I don’t really like that I’ve been successfully marketed to believe are essential to having access to at all times.

    I’m happy to pay a low fee and let Disney be responsible for keeping everything in whatever the modern format and resolution is and just clicking on it when I want to see it.

  4. Robert Crawford

    My current discretionary spending has reflected that trend and will continue to do so as I'm running out of room with thousands of discs in my film library.

    I have been buying more digital content than discs lately, too. The prices are usually much better, and as you say it helps with storage issues – – plus it gives us more content to view when away from home.

    I was planning on upgrading my Sony X800 UHD disc player to something with Dolby Vision support, but with how few UHD titles I have been purchasing I'm not sure it's a wise thing to do right now. This reminds me of when I transitioned from vinyl to CD's many years ago. I was getting ready to invest in a new, high end turntable just before I bought my first CD player. I never did get that turntable.

  5. The Disney+ announcement works into my ongoing assessment of my relationship with media. I’m starting to consider whether the rational behavior for me would be to stop buying completely and go to streaming services for all movie content.

  6. DaveF

    The Disney+ announcement works into my ongoing assessment of my relationship with media. I’m starting to consider whether the rational behavior for me would be to stop buying completely and go to streaming services for all movie content.

    I did that about 2 years ago. I own no physical media anymore. Believe me my only problem is choosing what to watch…

  7. Cranston37

    I did that about 2 years ago. I own no physical media anymore. Believe me my only problem is choosing what to watch…

    There are far too many movies I loved that are either not available to stream in HD or are of lesser quality in which the digital stream is derived from an older transfer. Furthermore, I love bonus material as such, that type of material isn't available to stream when it comes from boutique companies like Kino, Twilight Time or Shout! Factory.

  8. Case in point, I received the following Blu-rays from Kino today and each has bonus material that I will watch when I view the disc.

    Kotch
    The Midnight Man
    For a Few Dollars More
    Road to Morrocco
    Road to Singapore
    Road to Utopia
    Road to Zanzibar
    The Tarnished Angels

  9. Case in point, I received the following Blu-rays from Kino today and each has bonus material that I will watch when I view the disc.

    Kotch
    The Midnight Man
    For a Few Dollars More
    Road to Morrocco
    Road to Singapore
    Road to Utopia
    Road to Zanzibar
    The Tarnished Angels

  10. Robert Crawford

    There are far too many movies I loved that are either not available to stream in HD or are of lesser quality in which the digital stream is derived from an older transfer. Furthermore, I love bonus material as such, that type of material isn't available to stream when it comes from boutique companies like Kino, Twilight Time or Shout! Factory.

    The funny thing is, I feel the same way, but it just wasn't enough for me personally to stay down the buying everything road.

    Believe me, there are titles I miss. But what I have now is plenty to scratch my "I want to watch a movie itch." On top of that I have 18 books on my "to read" pile, sports teams I follow, workouts to do, etc etc.

    Streaming is enough for this movie lover…

  11. Robert Crawford

    There are far too many movies I loved that are either not available to stream in HD or are of lesser quality in which the digital stream is derived from an older transfer. Furthermore, I love bonus material as such, that type of material isn't available to stream when it comes from boutique companies like Kino, Twilight Time or Shout! Factory.

    The funny thing is, I feel the same way, but it just wasn't enough for me personally to stay down the buying everything road.

    Believe me, there are titles I miss. But what I have now is plenty to scratch my "I want to watch a movie itch." On top of that I have 18 books on my "to read" pile, sports teams I follow, workouts to do, etc etc.

    Streaming is enough for this movie lover…

  12. Cranston37

    The funny thing is, I feel the same way, but it just wasn't enough for me personally to stay down the buying everything road.

    Believe me, there are titles I miss. But what I have now is plenty to scratch my "I want to watch a movie itch." On top of that I have 18 books on my "to read" pile, sports teams I follow, workouts to do, etc etc.

    Streaming is enough for this movie lover…

    Well this movie lover utilizes both home video formats and I'm happier now than I ever been with this home theater hobby of mine.

  13. Cranston37

    The funny thing is, I feel the same way, but it just wasn't enough for me personally to stay down the buying everything road.

    Believe me, there are titles I miss. But what I have now is plenty to scratch my "I want to watch a movie itch." On top of that I have 18 books on my "to read" pile, sports teams I follow, workouts to do, etc etc.

    Streaming is enough for this movie lover…

    Well this movie lover utilizes both home video formats and I'm happier now than I ever been with this home theater hobby of mine.

  14. DaveF

    The Disney+ announcement works into my ongoing assessment of my relationship with media. I’m starting to consider whether the rational behavior for me would be to stop buying completely and go to streaming services for all movie content.

    That’s an interesting proposition.

    For me, for the time being, I’m going to continue to buy things that wouldn’t be easily available on streaming, if at all. So, Marvel and Lucasfilm 3D imports will still be purchases for me.

    I’d also feel comfortable purchasing titles if the physical versions contained content of value to me that wasn’t part of a streaming package. So if Disney puts out one version of, say, Fantasia on streaming and a different version on disc, I’m still down with buying that. (I love Fantasia.)

    On the other hand… let’s take a title with more marginal appeal to me. I never really cared all that much for Lady and the Tramp (don’t hate me!) and don’t own it in HD yet. I always figured I’d buy the Blu-ray when I felt like watching it again, and I hadn’t had the desire since the Blu-ray came out, and then it got vaulted and I missed it when I finally felt like I could be in the mood to watch it. That’s often how I’d end up buying stuff I didn’t really love but occasionally wander to see. That’s exactly the type of purchase I’d stop making.

  15. Over the years I have done streaming. I have purchased digital content (iTunes) Content when it was OOP on disc but still prefer Physical discs. Reason being I don't trust the studios and that includes Disney that they will say all content available on Streaming and stuff wont be there or will disappear

  16. John*Wells

    Over the years I have done streaming. I have purchased digital content (iTunes) Content when it was OOP on disc but still prefer Physical discs. Reason being I don't trust the studios and that includes Disney that they will say all content available on Streaming and stuff wont be there or will disappear

    Many of us "don't trust" too, but it's getting to the point where it's almost a non-issue. Yes, there are those all time personal favorites we all own on disc. But honestly, if there's a random movie I haven't watched in 10 years, at least with streaming I have 50,000 other things I could watch. Or if I absolutely had to revisit some random 1998 movie, I could probably rent it or subscribe to a channel which hosted it for a month, and watch it.

    I have my absolute favorites on disc I'll never let go of (Freaks and Geeks, Superman: the Movie, the entire 3 Stooges shorts collection, Gilligan's Island, Donnie Darko, Star Wars, Godfather and some others) but half of my collection doesn't really warrant that fear of it not being there anymore. More than likely I could spend $4 and watch it again anyway!

  17. Josh Steinberg

    That’s an interesting proposition.

    For me, for the time being, I’m going to continue to buy things that wouldn’t be easily available on streaming, if at all. So, Marvel and Lucasfilm 3D imports will still be purchases for me.

    I’d also feel comfortable purchasing titles if the physical versions contained content of value to me that wasn’t part of a streaming package. So if Disney puts out one version of, say, Fantasia on streaming and a different version on disc, I’m still down with buying that. (I love Fantasia.)

    On the other hand… let’s take a title with more marginal appeal to me. I never really cared all that much for Lady and the Tramp (don’t hate me!) and don’t own it in HD yet. I always figured I’d buy the Blu-ray when I felt like watching it again, and I hadn’t had the desire since the Blu-ray came out, and then it got vaulted and I missed it when I finally felt like I could be in the mood to watch it. That’s often how I’d end up buying stuff I didn’t really love but occasionally wander to see. That’s exactly the type of purchase I’d stop making.

    I’m not watching content only available on discs. I’ve given up on 3D, so that’s not a streaming drawback.

    There’s the thread “Why I own all the discs” (to paraphrase). I’ve been mulling on this lately, but I would title my thread, “Why do own all these discs?!?!”

    I am shaped by growing up with VHS. Owning movies was a luxury, a novelty, something to envy in others ‘ homes and to aspire to. It was like having a great set of full bookshelves or an incredible music library.

    I don’t buy books or CDs anymore.

    But 25+ years later, I still crave owning physical media for TV and movies (with seasonality based on new formats and recent hardware upgrades).

    And again, I’m asking, why? I’ve got 100 movies unwatched. It’s irrational (a fancy word for “dumb”) to have spent $1000+ that’s sitting unused. And I won’t reiterate my HTPC insanity, except to say I spent more time managing media thank watching media. There’s also a nerdy hobbyist aspect to it that scratches an itch. But…not wholly rational. But until now and HTPC was the only way to solve the problems with disc ownership (discs suck, TiVo ruined me, HTPC is the best of both worlds).

    But now finally, there are services emerging that solve the problems. Pay monthly money. Watch whatever I want whenever I want. They’re in 4K and Atmos is becoming more common. And the libraries with Disney+ start to look vast enough to consider streaming over MoviesAnywhere type buying.

    And the WAF for streaming services is *very* high.

    I don’t know yet. This is an ongoing internal dialogue. But I’m talking out loud about it with my wife too.

    It’s an interesting time for home theater stuff. 🙂

  18. Yep, that is my conclusion. Right now it's an AND not an OR. Subscription AND Disks AND purchased codes for streams. There's stuff I gotta have on disk. But there's a LOT of content where these streaming services will do just fine. Anyone who refuses to do both is going to be very disappointed in the near term. Anyone who refuses to stream is going to be very disappointed in the long term.

  19. My own issue (a personal idiosyncrasy) is that I want a single solution. I don’t like multiple approaches. That’s why I like the HTPC. For all its issues, its a total solution.

    Having discs and MoviesAnywhere and four different streaming subscriptions is just so …. UGH! It’s almost offensive in its inelegance.

    But…that’s life. I have to decide what set of inconveniences I’ll accept. Which are tempered by making my wife happy too. 😀

  20. DaveF

    I’m not watching content only available on discs.

    That may put you as more of a casual enthusiast level at this point; or maybe that sounds unfairly dismissive, which isn't my intention. I'm struggling to come up with a term that fits – someone with more mainstream tastes? There's a lot about streaming to love, and it's only going to get better, but at this point in my life and my media consumption, for me, the fact remains that there is still a good amount of content that appeals to me that's only available in a physical format. The amount of content available on streaming seems to increase all the time, and one day, it may be the case for me that everything I want is available at the touch of a button. Right now, we're not quite there yet.

    To give one example: I was recently turned on to a vintage show called "Have Gun – Will Travel." I would have been happy to stream all five seasons of the show if it had been available on something we had in our house – but it wasn't available on Netflix, Hulu, or Amazon Prime. Individual episodes and seasons were not available to purchase on Vudu or iTunes. The complete series set on disc was $40. So my choice was to either buy a disc at what I felt was a very reasonable rate, or not to see it at all. I chose to purchase the disc because I wanted to see the content.

    I'm a big Star Trek fan. The original series of Star Trek is streaming on a variety of services, but in the streaming realm, the only option for TOS on most services is the remastered HD version with newly created CGI special effects. Much fewer services carry the original versions with the original effects, and those that do only carry those versions in SD. If you want to watch the original series of Star Trek with their original special effects in HD resolution, the Blu-ray sets are the only way to accomplish that goal. Because it's an all-time favorite show, it's important to me to have that option. But of course, there are plenty of other shows where I will be happy to watch whatever version is most easily available once and that'll meet my needs just fine.

    Whenever the most recent Mission Impossible movie came out, my wife and I wanted to revisit the previous films in the series before seeing the latest one. They weren't available for streaming on any of the services we subscribed to. The digital retailers wanted $19.99 for each film individually as a purchase, or $4.99 to rent each film, so it would have been about $25 to see all of them again once. I checked on Amazon, and a brand new Blu-ray set with all of the films was about $15. In that instance, it was cheaper to purchase a physical object that would give me long term access to the films than it was to have temporary digital access to them.

    Part of home theater for me is figuring out the balance not only between available space but also available funds. I'll still purchase something on physical media if it's cheaper to do it that way. But I'm also keeping an eye on such purchases where they were purchased not with the intention of owning them forever, but because that was the cheapest option at the time. We did the same thing with the Bourne films when the latest was released a couple years ago. Would have been $20 to rent the four previous films on iTunes, or $15 to buy the four of them on disc in a box set (which came with digital copies that iTunes automatically upgraded to 4K). We rewatched the four Bourne movies and realized we didn't much like them. So I kept the digital copies, but sold the discs. They served their purpose; they allowed me to watch the films again at the cheapest price point available to me at the time I wanted to watch the films.

    Sam Posten

    AND purchased codes for stream

    I really think there's gonna be a day of reckoning on code purchases. I've made some myself, but I also am aware and acknowledge that it's outside of the terms of service for which those codes are provided, and that the digital retailers have every right to revoke those licenses since the codes were purchased in a manner that the terms of service don't allow for. I'll purchase a code for something if it can replace a rental, but not for something where I'm concerned about long term ownership. I really think a day could come where the digital retailers could ask you to verify your purchase of the physical disc the code was supposed to come with, and will start purging codes that they think were redeemed by people other than the disc purchaser. I feel much less secure with purchased codes than actual purchases made through a digital storefront. But I'm ok with that risk.

    DaveF

    My own issue (a personal idiosyncrasy) is that I want a single solution. I don’t like multiple approaches.

    Ehh, that's probably just unavoidably life. There are some foods that taste better when you cook them on a stovetop; there are other foods that are better in an oven. There are still other foods that are fine raw, or in a toaster, or in a microwave. Ultimately, there are many ways to prepare food, and one method doesn't invalidate another. I think that's basically true of media as well.

    There's going to be a lot of content that you're more interested in seeing once, where you won't mind if you miss the opportunity to do so; streaming subscription services work for the vast majority of people because that meets there need. There will likely be several titles that aren't easily available as part of a subscription, where you'll need to make the choice as to whether it's worth owning a physical object, purchasing a digital license, or whether it's something that you can be happy paying a $5 rental fee to watch on the occasions you want to see it.

    What I like about streaming is the potential for it to allow me to refocus my physical media collection on titles that actually resonate with me and hold importance to me, rather than just being a random collection of titles where it was easier to buy than rent, or where buying was the only option to see a particular film. I would guess that the vast majority of people who collect things across the history of human experience aren't doing so because they believe it will bring them vast wealth in the future; they're hobbyists who get joy out of curating a collection of things that they find meaning, convenience and/or comfort in. I think it's ultimately a good thing that the vast majority of moviewatchers will be able to have low-cost, convenient and efficient systems that work for them (like streaming) and that the few of us who enjoy collecting for reasons other than practicality still have options to do that.

  21. Josh Steinberg

    That may put you as more of a casual enthusiast level at this point; or maybe that sounds unfairly dismissive, which isn't my intention. I'm struggling to come up with a term that fits – someone with more mainstream tastes?

    That's fair. In my twenties, when I had an OG Netlflix DVD subscription and TV was limited to four networks recorded to VHS, I was going back to dramatic classics that I'd never seen. I was more exploratory in my viewing then. Currently, time and personal taste for movies limit me mainly to modern action-adventure. With that, streaming and cloud services could work really well for me. And as these become the norm, their catalogs will expand, giving me more chances to explore when my interests move back in that direction.

    Josh Steinberg

    To give one example: I was recently turned on to a vintage show called "Have Gun – Will Travel." I would have been happy to stream all five seasons of the show if it had been available on something we had in our house – but it wasn't available on Netflix, Hulu, or Amazon Prime. Individual episodes and seasons were not available to purchase on Vudu or iTunes. The complete series set on disc was $40. So my choice was to either buy a disc at what I felt was a very reasonable rate, or not to see it at all. I chose to purchase the disc because I wanted to see the content.

    I am overwhelmed by the unwatchable amount of incredible modern TV, with more coming out every year. Nothing against old shows, but I don't have time to watch new shows, or even rewatch not-so-old classics like Buffy. And no small part of the stupendous new stuff like Stranger Things and Man in the High Castle is streaming. So far me for the present, contemporary streaming do well with my tastes.

    I've been thinking I'm due to rewatch Futurama. So I watch my collection of DVDs and Blu-rays, all ripped to my media system? Or do I just stream them from whatever service I've got that has them? Because what used to require buying the seasons on disc is now an app-launch away on my iPad.

    But, what's missing I expect, or the superb commentary tracks. But again, time. Should I get through the series, will I have time to then do my commentary rewatch in addition?

    Josh Steinberg

    I'm a big Star Trek fan. The original series of Star Trek is streaming on a variety of services, but in the streaming realm, the only option for TOS on most services is the remastered HD version with newly created CGI special effects. Much fewer services carry the original versions with the original effects, and those that do only carry those versions in SD. If you want to watch the original series of Star Trek with their original special effects in HD resolution, the Blu-ray sets are the only way to accomplish that goal. Because it's an all-time favorite show, it's important to me to have that option. But of course, there are plenty of other shows where I will be happy to watch whatever version is most easily available once and that'll meet my needs just fine.

    Amazon Prime has the original and the revised TOS Trek. 🙂 I'm slowly rewatching Trek through Amazon. Though I'm watching the revised versions. My wife prefers that, and I decided that it's not that important to me. And more "classic" TV is coming to streaming. Farscape was recently announced as coming to Prime or Netflix. I never had a chance to watch that, so I might now be able to check it out.

    And in practically, even if I decide to really go to "digital" and away from discs, I'll undoubtedly buy some movies from MOviesAnywhere (or even buy the disc and redeem the code, because it's no more expensive). There will be movies not available through the particular assortment of services I have. Or they'll be available first on MA.

    Home media is in flux in a way that it hasn't been …. ever? There was VHS. And then DVD was the obvious improvement. And then Blu-ray was the obvious improvement (caveat, some confusion between HD-DVD). And now UHD is obviously better than blu-ray for enthusiasts. But streaming is bifurcation. It's slightly lower quality as of 2019, but is so much easier, than physical media.

  22. DaveF

    Nothing against old shows, but I don't have time to watch new shows, or even rewatch not-so-old classics like Buffy.

    I totally get that. I feel as if I'm being pulled in a different direction, that a lot of the newer shows don't appeal to me, but I recognize that I am in a minority with that viewpoint. But it's interesting that you mention Buffy. Fox recently commissioned an HD remastering of Buffy, and to say that the job was botched would be the understatement of the year. The first three seasons have been cropped from 4×3 to 16×9 in brutal fashion; the last four seasons have been opened up from 4×3 to 16×9 in similar brutal fashion that frequently reveals camera crew and lighting elements on either sides of the actors. The color timing was botched and everything — including the frequent nighttime scenes – now appear bright as day. It's not "minor nitpick" level bad, it's "worst remastering job ever" bad. So there's an example where having the DVD version somewhere is to your benefit. I don't want to watch Buffy episodes where the characters have half their heads cut off, or episodes where you see someone holding a light and a boom mike right next to the character speaking.

    DaveF

    Amazon Prime has the original and the revised TOS Trek.

    Yes, but only the revised version is in HD – the original versions are from the old standard definition masters that were used for the late 1990s DVD releases. Since I have the original versions in pristine HD quality, going back to the 1990s-era standard def video masters is a non-starter for me. I'm not saying that to suggest you should be bothered by that lack of availability. I'm just saying that for people who are long time collectors who are excited to go all in on digital, most of their content will probably make the transition to digital, but that there will probably be a handful of things worth holding on to the physical copies of.

    But like I've said in this and other threads, I've been purging superfluous stuff too. I'm very ok with getting rid of that Bourne box set since it's unlikely I'll ever watch it again; if I change my mind, I have the digital copies I've redeemed that'll do just fine. And I no longer see the value in holding on to DVDs I purchased almost twenty years ago and haven't touched since. The trick — as always — is to identify properly which things I watched once and am truly done with, and which things are rare enough and were enjoyed enough that it's worth holding onto because the hassle of finding them again would be more trouble than it was worth.

    I've been thinking about re-organizing my shelves again, actually. They've been alphabetical for years, but I'm no longer sure that makes sense for me. I think I want to separate things into the different categories that were the reason they were purchased. That's not as esoteric as it sounds. It just means, for instance, that I acquired all of Cary Grant's films when I was going through his filmography in 2016, many of which aren't available digitally, and it would probably make sense to have them all on the same shelf. I know that there are some of those movies I'd only rewatch in the context of feeling like a Cary Grant movie, but wouldn't be picked off the shelf for any other purpose. So instead of some random movie being buried in the A-Z area where it's not clear what it is or why I have it, putting it on a shelf with the other items it belongs with will probably encourage me to revisit those titles more. I recently did that with the Marvel MCU movies – they used to be alphabetical, but there are enough of them now that it makes sense to me to have them all together – then, if I feel like watching a Marvel movie, I can just look at them all at once and decide what I feel like.

    So I'm thinking, less physical media overall, and rearranging what does remain in a way that highlights why it appealed to me in the first place and makes it as accessible as possible.

    DaveF

    I was more exploratory in my viewing then. Currently, time and personal taste for movies limit me mainly to modern action-adventure.

    I've been finding this year that I'm also less interested in exploratory viewing than I had been in years past. I'm sure that spending 2016 watching and writing about Cary Grant films, spending 2017 watching and writing about my blind buys, and spending 2018 and 2019 writing official HTF reviews mostly for films I don't know has had something to do with that. No complaints or regrets about any of it. But I've had years where I wasn't really allowing myself to revisit the stuff I know I love, and I've missed it. This year, I've been rewatching a bunch of my stuff and it's been so enjoyable to do so. I used to have a lot more alone time, and I don't regret using it to further my movie history education. But now that my schedule and my wife's schedules have changed so much, now that our schedules are a bit more in line and we have more time together, the criteria for what to watch is totally different, if we're even watching anything. And that's okay. Wouldn't change it for the world. But it's time for me to stop buying new things as if I still had unlimited free time.

  23. One more thing to add from my possibly unusual vantage point – I’ve been living in the same apartment since 2014 and the thinking is that we’ll be thinking of moving in maybe a year, two at the most. Onward and upward, etc.

    Since I’ve been living on my own post college, I’ve moved eight times between 2003 and now. I’m keeping a very close eye on which discs haven’t been touched since which move. I have no problem with the idea of packing, moving and unpacking stuff that I actually watch and enjoy. But there are plenty of things that haven’t been touched since at least a couple moves ago, and I wanna cut all of that fat out before the next round of moving.

    What used to hold me back was “This was really cheap to buy and won’t get me anything if I try to sell it, so might as well keep it.” If I owned my home, I might leave it at that. But as the guy who has to pack and schlepp it all, I’m seeing the value not in the cash I’d get for selling but in having less to pack and carry.

    Anything that came with an HD digital copy that I can still access, where the physical disc hasn’t been touched in over five years, is a prime candidate for culling.

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