THX certifies first live music event for Aerosmith

If we thought THX was uniquely a licensing organization aimed at improving the playback of filmed entertainment in both the home and professional theaters, that perception will almost certainly change. Aerosmith has launched a Las Vegas residency for the so-titled extravaganza Aerosmith: Deuces are Wild, at Park Theater at the new Park MGM resort, and the show’s sound quality is being overseen by the former Lucasfilm company. The show itself promises to combine “visceral rock” with high tech to bring to life the story of a struggling group from Boston who became America’s all-time top-selling rock ‘n’ roll band.

The centerpiece of the show is a 90-minute live performance from the original Aerosmith band members: Steven Tyler, Joe Perry, Tom Hamilton, Brad Whitford and Joey Kramer. The event’s producers claim the show goes beyond the average concert by taking fans through Aerosmith’s career with unreleased audio and visuals from the group’s archives, and featured through a 12-screen media presentation (including a 140 ft x 40 ft high def screen) by VFX studio Pixomondo.

The THX Certified live performance venue features an L-Acoustics L-ISA Immersive Hyperreal Sound system, comprising 230 L-Acoustics loudspeakers and 300,000 watts of power to wrap the audience in a “sphere” of 360° audio. As a part of the THX certification process, the technical team evaluated the L-Acoustics system design and implementation, verified alignment of the acoustics systems, and integrated the equipment and technologies. Fans who have attended the show hear the THX Deep Note play – derived from the original ‘Broadway’ cinema trailer – and which was remixed specifically for the immersive audio system used during the Aerosmith residency.

In a THX On-Stage VIP section, fans will also access studio-quality audio from the Aerosmith mixing board via MIXhalo audio technology and through each audience member’s own pair of THX Certified 1MORE triple driver in-ear headphones.

Published by

Martin Dew

editor

8 Comments

  1. Martin Dew

    Thanks, Brian. It may be that this is the first installation-specific live certification, but that wasn't clear in press materials.

    It would be nice if THX can get back to what they use to be about. They have a partnership with Cinemark and they are certifying all of their XD theaters, and they just announced their first large format theater, but it would be nice to see more and getting back to certifying blu ray and 4k discs. They lost their way after Razer acquired them, but Lucasfilm hasn’t been involved since 2006. Still wondering why Lucasfilm let it go?

  2. Couldn't agree more, Brian. I was there when THX was spun off and acquired by Creative Labs investors in 2003. Sad day for us all. Probably the company lost its way at that time. Its IP and consumer appeal had always been tied up specifically in movie presentation in all its forms, and it should have stayed that way. When it diversified and moved into car and computer audio and other platforms, the magic just withered away and the message died. Lucasfilm got shot of it because THX's income was a tiny fraction of the other divisions.

  3. Martin Dew

    Couldn't agree more, Brian. I was there when THX was spun off and acquired by Creative Labs investors in 2003. Sad day for us all. Probably the company lost its way at that time. Its IP and consumer appeal had always been tied up specifically in movie presentation in all its forms, and it should have stayed that way. When it diversified and moved into car and computer audio and other platforms, the magic just withered away and the message died. Lucasfilm got shot of it because THX's income was a tiny fraction of the other divisions.

    I remember a few months ago, they did a Facebook Q and A and I asked if they are planning on getting back to certifying Blu Ray and 4K discs, heck even streaming movies, and I got no response on that.

  4. Martin Dew

    Couldn't agree more, Brian. I was there when THX was spun off and acquired by Creative Labs investors in 2003. Sad day for us all. Probably the company lost its way at that time. Its IP and consumer appeal had always been tied up specifically in movie presentation in all its forms, and it should have stayed that way. When it diversified and moved into car and computer audio and other platforms, the magic just withered away and the message died. Lucasfilm got shot of it because THX's income was a tiny fraction of the other divisions.

    One of the best cinematic experiences I ever had was when I saw Oliver Stone's Born On The Forth Of July in 70mm, the first week of 1990 at McClurg Ct Cinema in Chicago. The main theater was a THX certified theater, at that time they still said THX Sound System, and I saw that Cimaron trailer with the conductors hand. I wish I saw more at that theater, I saw Gettysberg in 1993, True Lies in 1994, the RAH restoration of Vertigo in 70mm, last film I saw there was The Thin Red Line. I sort of get that excitement back at a Dolby Atmos theater, like where I live now in Arizona, we have the Harkins chain and when I see a film at their PLF's like Cine Capri or Cine 1, it has that excitment of a THX theater back in the day. Even a Dolby Cinema at AMC has it, but still not the same as the first time I entered that theater in Chicago. I regrest not seeing the Star Wars Special Editions at that theater, and went to one closer to my house.

  5. Yes, amazing how great film presentation just captures the imagination. We had a THX theater in High Wycombe (UCI Cinemas), UK, near where I lived and that was the venue that started my interest in top-notch film presentation, and then led me seek out a job at Lucasfilm. I saw Silence of the Lambs, True Lies, Jurassic Park and Schindler's List (among many others) during the early 90s at that location. The sound was nothing short of extraordinary in those days. Dolby, with Dolby Cinema, has definitely picked up the baton where THX left off. Many of my pals who worked with me at Skywalker in the late 90s now head up Dolby Cinema – we all shared the same passion. If THX hadn't taken their eye off the ball, it could have all been theirs.

  6. Martin Dew

    Yes, amazing how great film presentation just captures the imagination. We had a THX theater in High Wycombe (UCI Cinemas), UK, near where I lived and that was the venue that started my interest in top-notch film presentation, and then led me seek out a job at Lucasfilm. I saw Silence of the Lambs, True Lies, Jurassic Park and Schindler's List (among many others) during the early 90s at that location. The sound was nothing short of extraordinary in those days. Dolby, with Dolby Cinema, has definitely picked up the baton where THX left off. Many of my pals who worked with me at Skywalker in the late 90s now head up Dolby Cinema – we all shared the same passion. If THX hadn't taken their eye off the ball, it could have all been theirs.

    Man, I would love to have worked for Lucasfilm, or nowadays Skywalker Sound which is still part of Lucasfilm

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