The Tall Men Blu-ray Review

4 Stars

Matt Hough submitted a new blog post

The Tall Men Blu-ray Review
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Matt Hough

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24 Comments

  1. I like this movie a little more than you do, but I'm not ready to shell out $29.95 for it on Blu-ray as I'm quite happy with my 2012 German BD. Now, if somebody can tell me definitively that the TT release is an improvement over the Koch BD then I might change my mind. However, I do have it on HD Digital too.

  2. You beat me to it – again. 🙂

    The transfer is fantastic, but I await the usual suspects TEAL and TOO BLUE and these films never looked like this. Only they did, Blanche, they did. This is no different than any other Fox transfer of the last few years – it corrects the color of the old DVDs and previous home video transfers. There's tons of blue in this – TONS – blue lighting galore, all over the place and clearly blue gels on the lights.

    I really liked the movie, too.

  3. Robert Crawford

    I like this movie a little more than you do, but I'm not ready to shell out $29.95 for it on Blu-ray as I'm quite happy with my 2012 German BD. Now, if somebody can tell me definitively that the TT release is an improvement over the Koch BD then I might change my mind. However, I do have it on HD Digital too.

    This is a whole new transfer and is fantastic.

  4. Robert Harris

    I’ve not yet had a chance to review, but from these frames, two things seem to appear, neither of which may be accurate.

    First, left side of frame cropped. Secondly, image appears overly unsqueezed, which could be the desire to reach a 2.55 from 2.35 aspect ratio.

    Yes, cropped on the left and a tiny bit on the bottom also.

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  5. Randy Korstick

    I'm just not a big fan of Warlock. I like it just don't love it. I like it because of the big production and the cast but find it a bit sluggish.

    Fair enough, but I just think Warlock is a better and deeper movie than The Tall Men.

  6. Simply to put in my two cents about whether WARLOCK or THE TALL MEN are better Westerns. Of course, it all depends on how you define "Western."

    WARLOCK is mostly staged on interior sets. It's character driven, very subtle and fascinating, if you get caught up in the interplay and character transformations. It's a great "psychological" Western. However, there are no real big action sequences.

    THE TALL MEN, on the other hand, is filled with spectacular actions sequences, though the plot is really just a pin to hang those action sequences on. Clark Gable and Jane Russell don't play characters; they are larger than life versions of their typical personas. This is not meant as a criticism. They don't need to act. All they have to do is BE, and they both do that spectacularly.

    I love both these films. I think both of them are wonderful examples of their specific type of Western, and I really can't see how one could argue that one is better than the other, as they're really completely different.

    It's like which is better: Pizza or Coq au Vin? Well, it depends what you're looking for!

  7. haineshisway

    Completely incorrect – it is every bit as blue as the other Fox titles – try watching it rather than looking at random screen caps.

    How can it be incorrect when I obviously commented on the caps that another member linked to and not the disc?

  8. lark144

    Simply to put in my two cents about whether WARLOCK or THE TALL MEN are better Westerns. Of course, it all depends on how you define "Western."

    WARLOCK is mostly staged on interior sets. It's character driven, very subtle and fascinating, if you get caught up in the interplay and character transformations. It's a great "psychological" Western. However, there are no real big action sequences.

    THE TALL MEN, on the other hand, is filled with spectacular actions sequences, though the plot is really just a pin to hang those action sequences on. Clark Gable and Jane Russell don't play characters; they are larger than life versions of their typical personas. This is not meant as a criticism. They don't need to act. All they have to do is BE, and they both do that spectacularly.

    I love both these films. I think both of them are wonderful examples of their specific type of Western, and I really can't see how one could argue that one is better than the other, as they're really completely different.

    It's like which is better: Pizza or Coq au Vin? Well, it depends what you're looking for!

    I agree they are different films just as Warlock and Bandolero are different types of Western but the precedent was set in that thread to compare which is better which carried over here since all 3 are recent Twilight Time Western releases.

  9. Randy Korstick

    I agree they are different films just as Warlock and Bandolero are different types of Western but the precedent was set in that thread to compare which is better which carried over here since all 3 are recent Twilight Time Western releases.

    Actually, I think the only proper recourse is to own and regularly watch both (along with BANDOLERO)

  10. OliverK

    How can it be incorrect when I obviously commented on the caps that another member linked to and not the disc?

    Because you didn't say that in your post? I understand what you were doing, but it was completely incorrect and I wanted to be sure that anyone ne reading it understood you did not have the disc. He even talks about all the blue in his whatever you call what he writes.

  11. haineshisway

    Because you didn't say that in your post? I understand what you were doing, but it was completely incorrect and I wanted to be sure that anyone ne reading it understood you did not have the disc. He even talks about all the blue in his whatever you call what he writes.

    I would think that quoting the post linking to the screenshots would make it clear to everybody that I was commenting on them. Forum readers are usually quite familiar with the quote function….

  12. My copy was due today but didn't make it. This is a bit off-topic, but the review mentioned the 'traditional elements found in a cattle drive western…' and the clichés.

    A western published in 1973 by Clair Huffaker takes the cattle drive western and puts a bit different spin on it. In 1880, fifteen cowboys are tasked to take a herd of longhorns (350+) from Montana to Vladistock, Russia, then lead them 1000 miles into Siberia. Reaching the Russian port, they are met by sixteen Cossacks who are to act as bodyguards. For the cowboys, yes- but more importantly, for the cattle. Also replace hostile Indians with Tartar warriors. The novel is called 'The Cowboy and the Cossack.'

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    It's author, Clint Haffaker "…was a legendary western screenwriter and author. His screenplays include The Comancheros, Hellfighters, and War Wagon starring John Wayne, along with Flaming Star, Seven Ways from Sundown, Rio Conchos, and Posse from Hell. Huffaker also wrote for TV western series such as Bonanza, The Rifleman, The Virginian, and Rawhide, including eighteen episodes of Lawman. Many of his movies were based on his bestselling books. Huffaker was a cowboy, a champion boxer, a part-time smuggler, and a writer for Time, Inc. in New York. He served in the Navy in World War II, studied in Europe, and eventually returned to the US where he began his career as a freelance writer. He wrote short stories, screenplays, and novels at his home in Los Angeles, which was a gathering place for actors, stuntmen, directors, and writers who could regularly be found there shooting pool, playing poker, and exchanging tall tales."

    Huffaker, Clair. The Cowboy and the Cossack (Nancy Pearl's Book Lust Rediscoveries) (p. 362). AmazonEncore. Kindle Edition.

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    And there's this from Paul Bishop's blog (http://www.paulbishopbooks.com/2019/09/the-cowboy-and-cossack.html)—

    "With Huffaker's ability to get his novels not only bought by Hollywood, but to also get them produced and released, it is a mystery why The Cowboy and the Cossack (arguably his best and most popular novel) has never made it to the screen. At one time producer Lance Hool held the movie rights. He famously attempted to get the film made with Clint Eastwood and Charles Bronson in the title roles, which would have been epic casting. Later, Albert R. Broccoli, the co-producer of the James Bond films, acquired the rights, but his efforts also stalled in development hell."

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    Anyway, it's available on Kindle for 99 cents. Just my two cents.

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