The Maze 3D Blu-ray Review

Moody suspense film is a 3D winner 3.5 Stars

The Maze, produced at Allied Artists with an obviously modest budget and brief production schedule, still proves to be a moody, involving little thriller, and the 3-D Film Archive has resurrected this shuddery tale with all of its most appealing qualities intact.

The Maze (1953)
Released: 26 Jul 1953
Rated: APPROVED
Runtime: 80 min
Director: William Cameron Menzies
Genre: Horror, Sci-Fi
Cast: Richard Carlson, Veronica Hurst, Katherine Emery, Michael Pate
Writer(s): Daniel B. Ullman (written for the screen by), Maurice Sandoz (novel)
Plot: A Scotsman abruptly breaks off his engagement to pretty Kitty and moves to his uncle's castle in the Scottish highlands. Kitty and her aunt follow Gerald a few weeks later, and discover he ...
IMDB rating: 6.0
MetaScore: N/A

Disc Information
Studio: Kino
Distributed By: N/A
Video Resolution: 1080P/MVC
Aspect Ratio: 1.37:1
Audio: English 2.0 DTS-HDMA, English 3.0 DTS-HDMA
Subtitles: English SDH
Rating: Not Rated
Run Time: 1 Hr. 20 Min.
Package Includes: 3D Blu-ray
Case Type: keep case
Disc Type: BD50 (dual layer)
Region: A
Release Date: 04/24/2018
MSRP: $34.95

The Production: 3/5

Of all the genres that found their way into 3D productions, perhaps the horror films are the ones most fondly remembered today by fans of the process. They didn’t normally have the biggest budgets or the most famous stars, but they seem to be the ones which are most revered now decades after the fact. William Cameron Menzies’ The Maze is a case in point. Produced at Allied Artists with an obviously modest budget and brief production schedule, it still proves to be a moody, involving little thriller, and the 3-D Film Archive has resurrected this shuddery tale with all of its most appealing qualities intact.

Two weeks before his marriage to the lovely Kitty Murray (Veronica Hurst), Gerald MacTeam (Richard Carlson) learns that a distant relative is dying and he is the next in line to inherit the Scottish Craven Castle and assume the title of baronet. After weeks of waiting for word of his return, Kitty is distressed to learn that Gerald is calling off their wedding and assuming a new life as lord of Craven Castle. With her Aunt Edith (Katherine Emery), Kitty sets out for Scotland determined to find out why Gerald has ended their relationship and cut himself off from all of his closest friends. What the two women find is an eerily dismal castle attended by two dour servants (Michael Pate, Stanley Fraser), mysterious sights and sounds that can’t be easily explained, and the new baronet Gerald aged twenty years from the last time they saw him. Kitty is convinced she can win back her fiancé if only she continues to press him about what’s really going on behind the closed doors of the ancient fortress with a foreboding maze at its rear. Cold and gruff, Gerald insists that Kitty and Edith must leave the grounds as soon as possible.

Screenwriter Daniel B. Ullman’s script is adapted from the book of the same name by Maurice Sandoz and remains relatively faithful to the original tale. It’s more Gothic melodrama than outright horror, the major surprise held until the film’s final ten minutes or so. But Oscar-winning production designer William Cameron Menzies helming the movie makes sure the atmosphere is moody and filled with a sense of impending dread, and several sequences are nicely paced, especially Kitty’s initial investigation of a cobweb-infested secret passage, Aunt Edith’s halting snooping around a forbidden upper floor bedroom, and the climactic search of the maze where dim light and deep shadows instill some shudders even with the inevitable less-than-shocking payoff (audiences at the time supposedly were extremely frightened by the revelation though more modern eyes used to the sickeningly grotesque sights capable today with unlimited budgets and new advances in make-up and CGI effects will likely find it somewhat less effective). A designer with the skill of William Cameron Menzies really makes wonderful use of his small budget by using 3D to maximum effect by delivering great depth of field making fairly small real-life sets seem endlessly long and vast in scope (though the depth effect backfires at one point: the cramped inside of the taxi the women take to the castle seems like a luxury limousine in 3D).

Richard Carlson gets top billing in the film as the angst-ridden lord of the manor and plays the contrast from the devil-may-care Gerald in the early scenes to the grumpy, surly baronet with dexterity, but the movie’s real star is Veronica Hurst as the single-minded Kitty who is in more scenes than any of the other actors. With enough pluck for five movie heroines and a pushy nature that simply won’t take “no” for an answer, Hurst’s Kitty is brash and forward, taking liberties against her host’s wishes feeling that doing these things in his best interest makes them right. Katherine Emery narrates the movie as Aunt Edith and performs with restraint excepting one moment when Gerald’s forceful manhandling of her niece sends her on the warpath. Michael Pate has been considerably aged as the dour butler William carrying out his orders and serving as an ever-threatening presence. Among the friends the aggressive Kitty invites to the castle to try to save Gerald from his demons are the underused and always welcome Hillary Brooke and the effervescent Robin Hughes who makes the most of his brief appearances throughout the movie.

Video: 4.5/5

3D Rating: 5/5

The movie is presented in its original 1.37 theatrical aspect ratio (the large amount of headroom in many of the shots is explained somewhat in the commentary track) in 1080p resolution using the AVC/MVC codec. Sharpness is excellent through most of the movie, and apart from a few negligible remnants of dust and dirt specks, it’s a clean and appealing image. Grayscale is most impressive with rich black levels and crisp whites, and contrast is spot-on throughout. The movie has been divided into 10 chapters.

The 3D is magnificent throughout. The sense of depth is almost constantly palpable, not just in shots of the maze but in the corridors and staircases of the castle and in various rooms which seem to gain in size by half again in 3D. Objects have been arranged interestingly to take advantage of 3D’s frame compositions, and forward projections do not disappoint: from acrobatic dancers in a nightclub scene kicking over our heads to tables jutting out of frame, a letter being presented before us, bats circling overhead, and a most memorable spiky tree limb which greets us in the film’s second half introduction (yes, the “Intermission” title card is impressively intact, too).

Audio: 5/5

The disc offers audio tracks in both DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mono and a reconstituted 3.0 track. Both tracks are wonderfully free from age-related artifacts like hiss, crackle, and pops, and the 3.0 track makes use of most effective directional dialogue across the front soundstage while Marlin Skiles’ marvelously and subtly moody score gets nice placement throughout the mix.

Special Features: 3.5/5

Audio Commentary: film historian Tom Weaver serves as host and primary commentarian offering background on the original book, the film’s tortured history to final production, and background on the key players while also welcoming historians David Schecter to talk about the evocative music of Marlin Skiles, 3-D Film Archivist Bob Furmanek to discuss the 3D restoration of the movie, and Dr. Robert Kiss to note the film’s theatrical 3D, 2D, and television releases. It’s a commentary track packed with interesting information and a must listen for fans of the film.

Veronica Hurst Interview (6:08, HD): the British actress recalls quite fondly her experiences making the film in America.

Theatrical Trailer (2:14, 2D/3D)

Overall: 3.5/5

Another Golden Age 3D gem The Maze has been redeemed by the 3-D Film Archive for fans of subtle Gothic suspense complete with a really superb 3D rendering, a most effective new soundtrack mix, and some bonus features fans of the movie won’t want to be without. Kudos!

Published by

Matt Hough

author,editor

58 Comments

  1. So glad that you enjoyed it, Matt.

    THE MAZE was brought back to stereoscopic life and these important individuals made it happen:

    Jerry Lewis introduced me to Martin Scorsese on October 6, 2015. That meeting at the Museum of the Moving Image in Astoria, New York cut through miles of red tape and started the ball rolling immediately on this project.

    Martin Scorsese and Margaret Bodde at the Film Foundation insured that we had 4K scans of the left/right 35mm camera negatives and provided much-needed funding in order to make that happen.

    Laura Thornburg and Andrea Kalas at the Paramount Archive provided access to the camera original 35mm elements. The 4K scans were done at PRO-TEK in Burbank, CA.

    Richard Lorber and Frank Tarzi at Kino Lorber Studio Classics secured the license.

    Greg Kintz did the painstaking 3-D image restoration plus scene-to-scene grading of the raw scans.

    Thad Komorowski did the meticulous dirt and damage clean-up.

    Eckhard Büttner recreated the lost stereophonic sound from mono optical elements.

    Jack Theakston helped with research and QC on the work-in-progress.

    The entire 3-D Film Archive team is VERY proud of this restoration!

  2. A few weeks ago, I got to see the final check disc for The Maze. The entire 3D Film Archive team should be very proud of this restoration, they did a stupendous job. I have seen The Maze in 35mm dual projector polarized 3D, and quite honestly, the bluray looked better. As always, Greg did a fantastic job of aligning the sides, as did Eckhard in recreating the lost stereophonic sound. Personally, I liked what he did better than many of the Chase stereo recreations I have heard over the years. This sounds like a real stereo mix.

    The entire team has my thanks for bringing this to Bluray.

  3. As to sealed lips for an older film:

    When I was a kid, I went to a friends house to watch 1953 "Invaders from Mars" on TV
    (since my Father & Brother were watching some sporting event on the single TV at home).

    Well, some jerk that was visiting came into the room and said, "oh, I've seen this. It's the one that ends with the . . . "

    I don't know the guy's name nor do I remember his face, but I have hated him all my life.

  4. aPhil

    As to sealed lips for an older film:

    When I was a kid, I went to a friends house to watch 1953 "Invaders from Mars" on TV
    (since my Father & Brother were watching some sporting event on the single TV at home).

    Well, some jerk that was visiting came into the room and said, "oh, I've seen this. It's the one that ends with the . . . "

    I don't know the guy's name nor do I remember his face, but I have hated him all my life.

    Hear, hear – I wasn't even there and I hate him too! Can't stand folk who bandy spoilers around, whether in real life or online (some here are guilty and need to learn how to use spoiler tags). It's so easy to discuss or review any film without totally ruinng it for others. Almost invariably the witless idiots who do so are simply showing off that they've already seen it. Oneupmanship at its worst.

  5. I don’t understand modern reviewers. I taught English for many years. Students were always taught to write only 3-5 sentences about the plot of anything, and concentrate on criticism. Those who want the plot should see the movie or read the book, not be told what is going on by them.

  6. I've bumped this review back to the front page for those who got The Maze this week and are watching it this weekend to have a place to talk about it rather than weighing down Bob's personal thread (though I'm sure he won't mind which thread you use as long as you talk about it!)

  7. Thanks to Martin Scorsese and Margaret Bodde at the Film Foundation for ensuring we worked from 4K scans of the original 35mm camera negatives.

    We rarely have that opportunity and what an amazing difference it makes!

  8. I have a sad story to tell. The day before my copy of The Maze was delivered, my pride and joy Epson 5040UB projector up and died. It's only 8 months old and still under warranty. 🙁

  9. Mark-P

    I have a sad story to tell. The day before my copy of The Maze was delivered, my pride and joy Epson 5040UB projector up and died. It's only 8 months old and still under warranty. 🙁

    Argh! Nothing is more irritating than equipment that fails far earlier than it should. At least it's still under warranty. Mine usually choose to fail on the other side of the warranty guarantee.

  10. Matt Hough

    Argh! Nothing is more irritating than equipment that fails far earlier than it should. At least it's still under warranty. Mine usually choose to fail on the other side of the warranty guarantee.

    Epson is sending me a replacement projector which will arrive Thursday. I guess the silver lining is that since I had used 400 hours on the lamp, my lamp life goes back to zero! Looking forward to being able to watch The Maze in 3D when the projector gets here.

  11. Mark-P

    Epson is sending me a replacement projector which will arrive Thursday. I guess the silver lining is that since I had used 400 hours on the lamp, my lamp life goes back to zero! Looking forward to being able to watch The Maze in 3D when the projector gets here.

    That's why both my TV and projector are 3D:cool: I also wear suspenders and a belt.:razz:

  12. Bob Furmanek

    Thanks to Martin Scorsese and Margaret Bodde at the Film Foundation for ensuring we worked from 4K scans of the original 35mm camera negatives.

    We rarely have that opportunity and what an amazing difference it makes!

    I keep meaning to do this and never seem to get to it so here goes – We are so lucky to have you around Bob. Your dedication and work, yes along with help from many others, have helped to preserve a rich history that otherwise would probably have vanished. You should be very proud of what you have accomplished up 'till now. Not to mention, your kick a** 3D web site.

  13. I am very late to the party on this but I just wanted to add my two cents here and offer my congratulations and praise for this incredible release of The Maze.

    I was unfamiliar with the content of the film when I watched it. I knew that it was meant to be atmospheric and had some mystery elements to it – I love the original ad campaign which Bob has played homage to in his posts imploring us not to reveal the ending, which I won’t do – and to be able to watch a film that’s been around for this long which fresh eyes is a rare treat. So that’s my first bit of praise – well done Bob, well done Kino, and well done fellow HTF members in honoring that spirit and allowing me the privilege of seeing it blindly.

    The technical work the filmmakers brought to the table is flawless. This is one of the most impressive uses of 3D I’ve ever seen. The sense of depth is extraordinary, and the layering within the image is perhaps the best I have ever seen. The compositions and framing make astonishingly good use of the 3D space. There were several times where I just had to pause the film to marvel at what I was seeing. Honestly, just about every camera setup here is worth further examination.

    As to the film itself, I was thoroughly entertained, so much so that the “intermission” title card took me by surprise – the first half had me so wrapped up in the story that I didn’t realize how much time had gone by. This is the type of film I love watching, especially late at night and in the dark, when the mystery of what’s happening onscreen can extend to the furthest corners of my mind. I was fully engrossed, trying to figure it all out while finding it impossible to put my finger on it. But the settings and characters were so well established that I knew I would be able to accept anything that the movie might reveal. I never would have guessed the ultimate resolution but once it was revealed, I was sold on it – the filmmakers made their case.

    The work to bring this film to disc by the 3D Film Archive is incredible. Bob is a humble and gracious man and I know that his instinct will be to deflect all praise to his colleagues and Scorsese and the Film Foundation – all worthy of praise – but Bob’s passion and enthusiasm cannot be understated. Bob, Greg, Jack, Eckhard and co. have done stunning work here. The image is pristine, which stunning clarity and flawless alignment. This was incredibly comfortable to watch despite the extreme use of depth that can sometimes be a stumbling block in lesser hands. The recreated three channel audio was a delight.

    The presentation was perfect.

    I can’t wait to dive into the extras on the disc!

  14. Mark-P

    I have a sad story to tell. The day before my copy of The Maze was delivered, my pride and joy Epson 5040UB projector up and died. It's only 8 months old and still under warranty. 🙁

    You got lucky, though… for most of us, things explode or stop working just after the warranty expires. Epson must have screwed up on the secret interior time clock! 🙂

  15. Mark-P

    Epson is sending me a replacement projector which will arrive Thursday. I guess the silver lining is that since I had used 400 hours on the lamp, my lamp life goes back to zero! Looking forward to being able to watch The Maze in 3D when the projector gets here.

    Mark, hopefully they send you a new one, but probably a refurbished unit. I received a brand new 6040 last year to replace mine that exhibited terrible crosstalk/ghosting. It seems within the last week it's starting to show slight crosstalk/ghosting…rats!

    Guess I'll have to contact them to maybe see about another one.

    Good luck and keep us updated on what you receive from them.

  16. I'd never seen this film before so it was good to be able to watch and see it in 3D. All in all an entertaining fun film. It was good to see the interview with Veronica Hurst providing her reminiscences of making the film. The recreated stereo sound was excellent. Yet another great job from Bob and co.

  17. I have watched again in 2D with the commentary. Good track from Tom Weaver with contributions from Bob and others. I think the image quality is one of the best b & w blu-rays and shows what can be done. I have said it before but b & w works better for me in 3D than colour.

  18. Watched it today with my new replacement projector. 3D, as expected, was eye-popping, and I still marvel at what Eckhard Büttner is able to accomplish with stereo rechannelization. Sadly though, the movie itself is a bit of a dud, dare I say the ending made me groan?

  19. Great news Mark! Did Epson send you a new or refurbished one? Also, can you check out something for me. At the very beginning, when the butler opens the window, do you see slight ghosting/crosstalk around his arms? And also, when he's meets the other guy in the hall before they both go up stairs is the g/c around them both?

    One last question, what film mode were you watching it in and are you using "0" DEPTH in the 3D section?

    Thanks for your help.

  20. John Sparks

    Great news Mark! Did Epson send you a new or refurbished one? Also, can you check out something for me. At the very beginning, when the butler opens the window, do you see slight ghosting/crosstalk around his arms? And also, when he's meets the other guy in the hall before they both go up stairs is the g/c around them both?

    One last question, what film mode were you watching it in and are you using "0" DEPTH in the 3D section?

    Thanks for your help.

    As far as I can tell, it's a refurb. At least that's what it said on the outside of the box. It looks brand new. I checked the scene you mention and can say I'm not detecting any ghosting there. However, I understand what it's like to obsess over 3D performance! When I first got my projector I thought the 3D was perfect, mainly because it was so much better that that of my former Panasonic Plasma. But then I started noticing ghosting issues on other movies that had more light-to-dark contrast. I found that the automatic iris was causing a lot of it as it would darken the image so much that the 3D would get muddy and then when a bright scene popped up there would be ghosting before the iris got opened back up all the way. Turning off auto-iris in 3D mode helped a lot and you really don't need it because the glasses darken the image just enough to give you good black levels. Any way I think the Epson gives a performance that is just about as good as is possible with active shutter technology, and I've learned that some tolerance is necessary as LCD shutters are never going to be 100 percent ghost-free.

    PS. I almost forgot to answer your second question. Film mode is 3D Cinema, but with the lamp on high. Yes, 3D depth set to "0". I believe in using the parallax set by the filmmakers, not creating my own. 🙂

    View attachment 46099

  21. Mark-P

    As far as I can tell, it's a refurb. At least that's what it said on the outside of the box. It looks brand new. I checked the scene you mention and can say I'm not detecting any ghosting there. However, I understand what it's like to obsess over 3D performance! When I first got my projector I thought the 3D was perfect, mainly because it was so much better that that of my former Panasonic Plasma. But then I started noticing ghosting issues on other movies that had more light-to-dark contrast. I found that the automatic iris was causing a lot of it as it would darken the image so much that the 3D would get muddy and then when a bright scene popped up there would be ghosting before the iris got opened back up all the way. Turning off auto-iris in 3D mode helped a lot and you really don't need it because the glasses darken the image just enough to give you good black levels. Any way I think the Epson gives a performance that is just about as good as is possible with active shutter technology, and I've learned that some tolerance is necessary as LCD shutters are never going to be 100 percent ghost-free.

    PS. I almost forgot to answer your second question. Film mode is 3D Cinema, but with the lamp on high. Yes, 3D depth set to "0". I believe in using the parallax set by the filmmakers, not creating my own. 🙂

    View attachment 46099

    DLP is awesome for 3-D.

  22. Mark-P

    As far as I can tell, it's a refurb. At least that's what it said on the outside of the box. It looks brand new. I checked the scene you mention and can say I'm not detecting any ghosting there. However, I understand what it's like to obsess over 3D performance! When I first got my projector I thought the 3D was perfect, mainly because it was so much better that that of my former Panasonic Plasma. But then I started noticing ghosting issues on other movies that had more light-to-dark contrast. I found that the automatic iris was causing a lot of it as it would darken the image so much that the 3D would get muddy and then when a bright scene popped up there would be ghosting before the iris got opened back up all the way. Turning off auto-iris in 3D mode helped a lot and you really don't need it because the glasses darken the image just enough to give you good black levels. Any way I think the Epson gives a performance that is just about as good as is possible with active shutter technology, and I've learned that some tolerance is necessary as LCD shutters are never going to be 100 percent ghost-free.

    PS. I almost forgot to answer your second question. Film mode is 3D Cinema, but with the lamp on high. Yes, 3D depth set to "0". I believe in using the parallax set by the filmmakers, not creating my own. 🙂

    View attachment 46099

    Wow, thanks for the reply Mark and your observations to my questions. I'm going to check my Auto Iris setting to see if that is the problem. I'm constantly tinkering with everything to get a better picture and maybe I changed the setting…damn, I hope that's it.

    IT IS!!! Just checked the Auto Iris and it was on HIGH. Changed it to OFF and the problem went away…whew!!! I had changed it to HIGH last week when I used that setting for UHD, figured it couldn't hurt, boy, was I wrong. I also checked ROGUE ONE and the beginning ship landing was ghost free.

    I use Dynamic Cinema for my film mode and LAMP on high and DEPTH on "0". I tried the other modes but I like the way it looked for 3D the best.

    Again, thank you so much for helping me out!!! Now I have to call Courtney @ Epson and tell him that I found the fix for my g/c issue.

    John

  23. Bob Furmanek

    That's very kind of you, thank you so much Marv!

    You are so welcome Bob. It was my pleasure. Please note – my post is already up to 13 likes. They aren't liking my post – they are saying "we agree". "He who saves art – creates art."
    Gosh I get profound on a Sunday morning.:)

  24. Having watched this this past weekend, I am sorry to say that for me, it was a mixed bag. The first few minutes up until the aunt begins her story, had a lot of ghosting. It improved afterwards with some shots looking remarkable and others with some further ghosting and even a bit more improvement after the intermission. Now my Oppo 95 is exhibiting a bit of strange behavior with 3-D playback (occasional jittering of the image) so perhaps the player may be a factor in not presenting the best 3-D. I will try again this weekend with my Samsung and see if there is any improvement.

  25. Gary Seven

    Having watched this this past weekend, I am sorry to say that for me, it was a mixed bag. The first few minutes up until the aunt begins her story, had a lot of ghosting. It improved afterwards with some shots looking remarkable and others with some further ghosting and even a bit more improvement after the intermission. Now my Oppo 95 is exhibiting a bit of strange behavior with 3-D playback (occasional jittering of the image) so perhaps the player may be a factor in not presenting the best 3-D. I will try again this weekend with my Samsung and see if there is any improvement.

    There is zero ghosting. It's not the disc.

  26. Gary Seven

    Having watched this this past weekend, I am sorry to say that for me, it was a mixed bag. The first few minutes up until the aunt begins her story, had a lot of ghosting. It improved afterwards with some shots looking remarkable and others with some further ghosting and even a bit more improvement after the intermission. Now my Oppo 95 is exhibiting a bit of strange behavior with 3-D playback (occasional jittering of the image) so perhaps the player may be a factor in not presenting the best 3-D. I will try again this weekend with my Samsung and see if there is any improvement.

    I noticed ghosting several times, too. It was strange (or maybe not). The foreground characters were in focus, but background characters had ghosting. Maybe it's my set, or my eyes, or my bifocal contact lenses – I don't know. I have noticed it a few times on other discs, but it seemed more prevalent on The Maze. But, it only happened in a few scenes scattered throughout the disc.

  27. Keith Cobby

    My Optoma projector gave me the best viewing experience of a 3D blu-ray. Didn't notice any problems at all. Same in 2D.

    Same here. Optoma projector, never any issues with ghosting on any 3D watched so far.

  28. Unfortunately, 3-D performance is, apparently, dependent on equipment. I made a few adjustments last night, changing the mode to custom, and doing a calibration and that improved things but still had some ghosting going on in some scenes. I'll still try with the Samsung system this weekend as that does seem to do 3-D better.

    As a side note, I have 3-D discs that do not have ghosting at all so it does seem the authoring of the disc plays a factor, at least to some degree.

  29. Gary Seven

    As a side note, I have 3-D discs that do not have ghosting at all so it does seem the authoring of the disc plays a factor, at least to some degree.

    It's a shortcoming of the 3-D display, but what highlights those limitations is higher parallax (stronger 3-D) combined with content with higher contrast (white next to black). Most of today's current 3-D content is milder than what was shot in the 1950s, and certainly far less parallax than what was used in the 1980's 3-D shot material. It's not unexpected at all that a lot of material will not show ghosting on a 3-D display, even when it has less than ideal cancellation, as it depends on the subject matter viewed.

    Like a display's ability to resolve low level black detail or display white peaks while avoiding white clipping, short comings in these given parameters are not always apparent until the right material comes along. The earlier LCD and LED active glasses 3-D displays had this issue the worst, but progress was made in later models to minimize it.

  30. TJPC

    I played this with almost no ghosting on my Sony system with active glasses. I was very pleased. With this system you can fart and there will be ghosting!

    A-ha! Maybe that's the cause of my issues!;)

  31. GregK

    It's a shortcoming of the 3-D display, but what highlights those limitations is higher parallax (stronger 3-D) combined with content with higher contrast (white next to black). Most of today's current 3-D content is milder than what was shot in the 1950s, and certainly far less parallax than what was used in the 1980's 3-D shot material. It's not unexpected at all that a lot of material will not show ghosting on a 3-D display, even when it has less than ideal cancellation, as it depends on the subject matter viewed.

    Like a display's ability to resolve low level black detail or display white peaks while avoiding white clipping, short comings in these given parameters are not always apparent until the right material comes along. The earlier LCD and LED active glasses 3-D displays had this issue the worst, but progress was made in later models to minimize it.

    On my Panasonic AE8000 projector, I can lessen or eliminate ghosting by turning down the contrast and/or brightness setting.

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