Sweet Charity (1969) coming to Blu from Kino

3 Stars

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Just saw this announcement pop up on my FB fueed. I know there’s several existing threads requesting this film be released on Blu. Looks like we’re finally getting it.

Release date is currently listed as “coming soon”.

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80 Comments

  1. Ken Koc

    Please Kino….Flower Drum Song and Thoroughly Modern Millie!

    Kino has already said it does not have Thoroughly Modern Millie. Twiilight Time has a new deal with Universal starting with the release of Anne Of The Thousand Days in December so I suspect if we're going to see an R1 version of Millie, it's probably going to be through TT (unless Shout Factory has it).

  2. Joe Caps

    I hope they fix the mistakes from the dvd. Part of the film was missing.
    I fixI hope we get more than a 2.0 track

    There is no excuse huge chunk of the film, or any film, being inexplicably missing from the DVD. That was before Universal's last merger, so hopefully they have learned their lesson by now.

  3. Everett S.

    Now we need Flower Drum Song! Ihope they clean up the mirror number.

    haineshisway

    And how would you propose they "clean up" the mirror number, which is an optical?

    Windex.:D

  4. Kyrsten Brad

    Any updates on when this film is being released?

    As of yesterday, Kino Lorber has remained silent on any release date.
    Go to the "Kino Lorber Insider" thread and see messages #2890 – #2893.

  5. I had only seen a few minutes of the film prior to a couple of days ago. While it has pacing issues and some of the directing choices don't hold up, I found it quite enjoyable and much better than its reputation had led me to believe. In another world, Gwen Verdon would have played the role and taken it to a new level, but the film we have is certainly good and worthy of the time of anyone who enjoys Musicals.

  6. Brian Kidd

    I had only seen a few minutes of the film prior to a couple of days ago. While it has pacing issues and some of the directing choices don't hold up, I found it quite enjoyable and much better than its reputation had led me to believe. In another world, Gwen Verdon would have played the role and taken it to a new level, but the film we have is certainly good and worthy of the time of anyone who enjoys Musicals.

    I disagree Ms. Verdon would have taken it to a new level – the movie would never have gotten made with her. Ms. Verdon worked on stage. There is a reason she did not become a movie star after Damn Yankees.

  7. haineshisway

    I disagree Ms. Verdon would have taken it to a new level – the movie would never have gotten made with her. Ms. Verdon worked on stage. There is a reason she did not become a movie star after Damn Yankees.

    I adore Gwen Verdon and was lucky enough (and old enough) to see her in the original production of Chicago. But I agree with you that like many other talented Broadway divas, the magic they have on stage doesn't translate to film. For every Broadway star like Julie Andrews or Barbra Streisand who shine on film and went on to have major film careers, there are other talented Broadway ladies like Mary Martin, Ethel Merman, Carol Channing, Tammy Grimes, Patti LuPone, Barbara Cook, Chita Rivera, Carol Lawrence, etc. that the camera just didn't love.

  8. That's a Warner Bros. film, so it'll likely get a Warner Archive release eventually. Universal now seems content to let others handle its catalog. Thankfully, both these films got Castro Theatre screenings in San Francisco in the past decade in very nice 35mm prints with lots of color left.

  9. Since I've been immersed in Fosse/Verdon for the past few weeks, I had every intention tonight of pulling out my Damn Yankees DVD and rewatching it, but time got away from me, and I didn't get around to it. I'd really like to see it again after a too-long absence from it.

  10. Matt Hough

    Since I've been immersed in Fosse/Verdon for the past few weeks, I had every intention tonight of pulling out my Damn Yankees DVD and rewatching it, but time got away from me, and I didn't get around to it. I'd really like to see it again after a too-long absence from it.

    Good idea! I'll do the same in the next few days!

    • NEW 4K REMASTER
    • Includes the original 151-Minute Roadshow Edition and the 145-Minute "Happy Ending" alternate cut
    • Audio Commentary by Film Historian Kat Ellinger
    • Edith Head Costume Design – Featurette
    • From Stage to Screen – Featurette
    • On Two BD50 Discs
    • Theatrical Trailer
    • A Girl Who Wanted to be Loved: A Booklet Essay by Film Historian Julie Kirgo
    • Reverse Art of the Polish Poster
    • Optional English SDH subtitles for the main feature

    July 23rd release date

  11. Ronald Epstein
    • NEW 4K REMASTER
    • Includes the original 151-Minute Roadshow Edition and the 145-Minute "Happy Ending" alternate cut
    • Audio Commentary by Film Historian Kat Ellinger
    • Edith Head Costume Design – Featurette
    • From Stage to Screen – Featurette
    • On Two BD50 Discs
    • Theatrical Trailer
    • A Girl Who Wanted to be Loved: A Booklet Essay by Film Historian Julie Kirgo
    • Reverse Art of the Polish Poster
    • Optional English SDH subtitles for the main feature

    July 23rd release date

    Very much looking forward to it. July seems very far away.

  12. That's great to know the alternate cut ending can be seen in the movie proper and not just as a supplement. I'll be honest, count me in the minority all you like, but I prefer that ending.

  13. Ronald Epstein
    • NEW 4K REMASTER
    • Includes the original 151-Minute Roadshow Edition and the 145-Minute "Happy Ending" alternate cut
    • Audio Commentary by Film Historian Kat Ellinger
    • Edith Head Costume Design – Featurette
    • From Stage to Screen – Featurette
    • On Two BD50 Discs
    • Theatrical Trailer
    • A Girl Who Wanted to be Loved: A Booklet Essay by Film Historian Julie Kirgo
    • Reverse Art of the Polish Poster
    • Optional English SDH subtitles for the main feature

    July 23rd release date

    Matt Hough

    Very much looking forward to it. July seems very far away.

    Yes indeed. I wish this release would be available for my next movie night.

    We’ve been developing a relatively new movie night tradition with family & friends when I’m home to screen some classics. It can lead to some fun & interesting time. Like when we had our close friends over when I first got the new Viz 75 for a screening of Mamma Mia (2008). Their 13 yo son Clint, Tommy 9 and Annalynn 6 all watched right along. Clint’s big comment “they sing way too much in this movie (guess who never really watched a musical before).

    Anyway guess I’ll have to wait till late July for movie night for Sweet Charity (1969). Oh and it’s a blind buy for me, never yet seen it.

  14. Given what I feel is the disastrous 4K "restoration" that was Irma La Douce, I'll wait from some reports on this. The French Blu-ray, which is, I believe, region-free and therefore has been available to everyone for a few years, is obviously not a new transfer, but it looks pretty spiffy.

  15. The Pre-Order price of "Sweet Charity" is asking for 40 bucks.
    For KL they seem to be reaching higher than usual and on the lines of a Criterion.
    At this price, definitely no Pre-Order until the reviews are in, as there's always France as the back-up and for $10.00 less.
    Nonetheless, I wonder if a 40 buck price-tag is any indicator that a lot of extra work went into this particular transfer.
    Any thoughts?

  16. PMF

    The Pre-Order price of "Sweet Charity" is asking for 40 bucks.
    For KL they seem to be reaching higher than usual and on the lines of a Criterion.
    At this price, definitely no Pre-Order until the reviews are in, as there's always France as the back-up and for $10.00 less.
    Nonetheless, I wonder if a 40 buck price-tag is any indicator that a lot of extra work went into this particular transfer.
    Any thoughts?

    It's $10 more than their usual $29.95 MSRP so what do you think?;)

  17. Robert Crawford

    It's $10 more than their usual $29.95 MSRP so what do you think?;)

    Like Charity Valentine, herself, my middle name is Hope.
    Furthermore, unlike France, it comes with an essay of favor;
    ergo, most likely, I'll go where Kirgo.:thumbs-up-smiley:

  18. battlebeast

    I don’t know anything about this film; why is it so popular? What’s so great about it?

    Wow. Opinions will vary.

    I think the hype is mainly due to the fact that fans have been waiting a very long time for a U.S. release.

    Is it a great musical? IMHO not when you line it up against the greatest movie musicals ever made.

    However, on its own merits, its a pretty good film that most of us grew up with or saw in film school.

  19. Ronald Epstein

    Wow. Opinions will vary.

    I think the hype is mainly due to the fact that fans have been waiting a very long time for a U.S. release.

    Is it a great musical? IMHO not when you line it up against the greatest movie musicals ever made.

    However, on its own merits, its a pretty good film that most of us grew up with or saw in film school.

    Thanks, Ron!

    I know a lot about a great many films, but that one passed me by…

  20. battlebeast

    I don’t know anything about this film; why is it so popular? What’s so great about it?

    "Sweet Charity" is a diamond in the rough;
    yet, there is far more about this film that is pitch-perfect and simply fantastic.

    Historically, we've got Bob Fosse's foray into film directing. When first viewing "Sweet Charity" in 2019, it's important to note that this work was released in 1969. Up until that time, if a motion picture being promoted and released was known to be a musical – and a Roadshow, to boot – then this signaled to parents that they were in for an afternoon or evening of "family" fare. Well, hold onto your hats kids; for "Sweet Charity" the film was a cleaned up version of a Broadway musical that catered to the grown-ups; which, in turn, was based on Fellini's "Nights of Cabiria (1954). Paraphrasing a Bob Fosse interview, "How do you make a G-Rated musical about a prostitute?" IMHO, the film of "Sweet Charity" was a work of genius, due to these very constraints and obstacles that the studios had imposed upon Mr. Bob Fosse. Always, always; from his very first film; he pushed the envelope. And three years later, upon the release of "Cabaret", one gets a stronger idea of exactly where "Sweet Charity" might've landed, if its director were given freer reign.

    "Sweet Charity" marked the transition of film musicals; flaws and all.

    Now, here are the strengths of "Sweet Charity":

    Bob Fosse's choreography, as captured through the wide lens of 3-time Oscar winner Robert Surtees.
    Edith Head's costumes, as worn by each of the Fosse dancers and getting a darned good workout.
    The Sound, as you just can't beat a score that's been arranged by the great and brilliant Ralph Burns.
    Shirley MacLaine's dancing, as co-choreographed by Gwen Verdon who originated the role on Broadway.
    Sammy Davis, Jr. going in for the kill and nailing it with his rendition of "Rhythm of Life".
    Ben Vereen in some early career stuff; so keep a sharp eye out;
    as you'll spot him twice in the episodic "Rich Man's Frug" nightclub numbers and "Rhythm of Life".
    And then there's Chita Rivera, Broadway's original Anita of "West Side Story" finally getting her due in a film musical;
    while, ironically, strutting it out on another NYC rooftop.

    Again, "Sweet Charity" has its flaws;
    but more often than not, it displays far greater strengths, exuberance and a vulnerability not unlike Charity, herself.

  21. battlebeast

    I don’t know anything about this film; why is it so popular? What’s so great about it?

    Sweet Charity is adapted from a hit Broadway show that is more or less itself an Americanized adaptation of the Fellini film Nights of Cabiria. The stage show starred Gwen Verdon and was directed and choreographed by her then husband, Bob Fosse. (They are the subject of the current mini-series being discussed in another thread here on HTF.) The score is by Cy Coleman and Dorothy Fields, and is full of energy and melody. (In fact, it is being presented in a special concert version this June in NYC.)

    Sweet Charity was Fosse's first film (he later directed the Oscar winning Cabaret). The film includes much iconic Fosse choreography, especially for Big Spender, There's Gotta Be Somewthing Better Than This, and Rich Man's Frug. It is both a heart warming and heart breaking story. One thing this film does very well IMO is create the world that the characters live in. It is very atmospheric and evocative of its time. Outstanding performances IMO from Shirley MacLaine, Chita Rivera, John McMartin and Stubby Kaye.

    The film was released on laserdisc in its roadshow version, complete with Overture, Entracte and Exit Music. The musical numbers only were presented in semi-widescreen. When the DVD was released, it was in full widescreen, however, the Entracte and Exit Music were missing, as was a crucial several minutes of the film itself (I am sure that was a mastering error and not intentional). Therefore, fans like me have been hoping for a high-def release that fixes those problems. I am fairly happy with the French blu, although it does not contain the Exit Music. I will gladly buy this one if it improves on the French release, but I will wait to read reviews here first.

  22. Enough of the outstanding Broadway score remains to retain the "feel" of the stage musical (though neither of the 2 1/2 new songs equals any of the stage score's numbers). Shirley MacLaine was the best available Hollywood star name who could sing and dance the part (though I saw a national tour with Gretchen Wyler that put Shirley's singing and dancing to shame, and I also saw Gwen Verdon on Broadway, enough said). Fosse's major missteps in the direction are because he's learning his craft AND trying to be innovative at the same time, and sometimes those elements are at odds with one another.

    I'll have more to say if I (a) get to review it, or (b) buy and watch it later.

  23. PMF

    "Sweet Charity" is […]

    KPmusmag

    Sweet Charity is […]

    Wow, if one were to look at the time stamps of both posts; being only 4 minutes apart;
    it would reveal that we were actually writing our takes on "Sweet Charity" at the exact same time.
    That kind of stuff on timing and coincidence has always intrigued me.
    Anyway, I gave yours a "Likes" because it was tighter and, well…because I liked it, too.:thumbs-up-smiley:

  24. PMF

    Wow, if one were to look at the time stamps of both posts; being only 4 minutes apart;
    it would reveal that we were actually writing our takes on "Sweet Charity" at the exact same time.
    That kind of stuff on timing and coincidence has always intrigued me.
    Anyway, I gave yours a "Likes" because it was tighter and, well…because I liked it, too.:thumbs-up-smiley:

    Thanks, I liked yours, too! Very good analysis IMO. And yes I noticed the timing as well.

  25. After finally getting to see it for the first time recently, I enjoyed it far more than its reputation led me to believe I would. In fact, I really, really liked it. It isn't perfect, as it starts to drag a little in parts, IMHO, but for lovers of Musicals, it's absolutely worth watching for Fosse's choreography and glimpses of his directorial talents that would blossom fully in Cabaret and All That Jazz. I just wish that he had gotten more opportunities to direct. While I'm not a big fan of Star 80, I adore Cabaret, All That Jazz, and Lenny.

  26. Watching Fosse/Verdon brought reminds me how deeply I’ve been attached to Fosse & Verdon since childhood, watching their movies on TV, getting to see their live productions as a young adult, etc. I loved the movie of Sweet Charity when it had already been cut. When I finally saw a fully restored roadshow version I was astounded by how much material Fosse was inspired to “reflect” from Fellini’s Cabiria. I think Fosse’s film of Charity is a masterpiece. The sum of its parts may be greater than the whole, but the parts are so powerful. Amazon keeps changing the release date. Now it’s Aug. 20. I’ll keep waiting.

  27. bestactor

    Watching Fosse/Verdon brought reminds me how deeply I've been attached to Fosse & Verdon since childhood, watching their movies on TV, getting to see their live productions as a young adult, etc. I loved the movie of Sweet Charity when it had already been cut. When I finally saw a fully restored roadshow version I was astounded by how much material Fosse was inspired to "reflect" from Fellini's Cabiria. I think Fosse's film of Charity is a masterpiece. The sum of its parts may be greater than the whole, but the parts are so powerful. Amazon keeps changing the release date. Now it's Aug. 20. I'll keep waiting.

    Fosse may have been inspired to keep stuff from Cabiria – but he isn't the writer of Sweet Charity, so you've got to give Mr. Simon (and the film's Peter Stone) some credit here. Also, and this is a fascinating thing, Sweet Charity began life as a whole other thing, meant to be a one-act in an evening of two one-act musicals that was also going to include a musical version of the Italian film, Big Deal on Madonna Street, (which Fosse would later revisit). At that point the show was called The Small World of Sweet Charity and had a book by Bert Fields rather than Neil Simon, Bert Fields being a nom-de-plume for Bob Fosse. There was even sheet music published for Gimme a Raincheck, the precursor to The Rhythm of Life, and I recorded it and Cy was thrilled to finally have it recorded. On the sheet music it's Bert Fields as writer of the book. But that one-act version was VERY different than what we know as Sweet Charity. I also recorded another number from that version, a hugely moving song called Pink Taffeta Sample Size 10.

  28. haineshisway

    […]There was even sheet music published for Gimme a Raincheck, the precursor to The Rhythm of Life, and I recorded it and Cy was thrilled to finally have it recorded.[… I also recorded another number from that version, a hugely moving song called Pink Taffeta Sample Size 10.

    Bruce, if its available, could you post the CD info; as I would be eager to purchase.

  29. KPmusmag

    The score is by Cy Coleman and Dorothy Fields, and is full of energy and melody.

    Thank you! That crucial point cannot be over emphasized but, strangely, is never mentioned.

  30. Thanks Bruce for your insight into the genesis of 'Sweet Charity' … fascinating stuff. And yes, the contribution from Cy Coleman and Dorothy Fields can never be understated. The new Criterion Blu of 'Swing Time' gives a succinct account of Dorothy Fields' contribution to American music-theatre over so many years .. it's one of the best features of the 'Swing Time' doco on the disc and almost makes up for the awful howler when a young 'expert' remarks that Fred Astaire lost his sister-partner Adele "when she married into Royalty". Sorry, the only American who's ever done that is named Megan!

  31. Sadly the movie jettisoned some of the best songs from the Broadway score and for me at least what remains is not helped by rather blah arrangements. I am glad this movie has fans and that it is coming out on blu ray, but it is not a favorite of mine.

  32. AnthonyClarke

    …and almost makes up for the awful howler when a young 'expert' remarks that Fred Astaire lost his sister-partner Adele "when she married into Royalty". Sorry, the only American who's ever done that is named Megan!

    Hardly. Remember Grace Kelly?

    Also, royalty isn’t confined to a monarch’s immediate family, British or otherwise.

  33. Jim*Tod

    Sadly the movie jettisoned some of the best songs from the Broadway score and for me at least what remains is not helped by rather blah arrangements. I am glad this movie has fans and that it is coming out on blu ray, but it is not a favorite of mine.

    Ralph burns never wrote a blah arrangement/orchestration in his life. He did the Broadway show of Charity and the film – while he had a bigger band for the movie, it's all Burns all the way. They didn't drop many songs – a couple were rewritten and the only notable drop was Too Many Tomorrows, and I'm not sure the film could have stood that song at that point in the film, nor do I think Mr. Montalban could have done it justice.

  34. They also dropped my favorite song "Baby, Dream Your Dream." And the two new songs that replaced "If You Could See Yourself" and "I'm the Bravest Individual" are not patches on them. The originals are better.

  35. haineshisway

    Ralph burns never wrote a blah arrangement/orchestration in his life.[…]

    I'm a 1000% with you, Bruce. Ralph Burns must've been a musical genius. When I was a teenager I scoured the city record shops to find anything that had his orchestrations, including a lesser known Hallmark recording of You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown. I would play tracks from the original cast album to friends who were taking music lessons in high school; and then I'd follow it up with the Ralph Burns arrangements. At this younger age, this was my best way to demonstrate the meaning of a musical arrangement; as it was night and day. Wish they had a recording of Dancin'; which I saw twice.

    JohnMor

    Hardly. Remember Grace Kelly?[…]

    …and, I might add, the only Princess to have an Oscar.:thumbs-up-smiley:

  36. haineshisway

    Ralph burns never wrote a blah arrangement/orchestration in his life. He did the Broadway show of Charity and the film – while he had a bigger band for the movie, it's all Burns all the way. They didn't drop many songs – a couple were rewritten and the only notable drop was Too Many Tomorrows, and I'm not sure the film could have stood that song at that point in the film, nor do I think Mr. Montalban could have done it justice.

    Actually I prefer the rewritten film version of the song Sweet Charity to the stage version of it. It's that rare instance of a film improving on a song from the stage version. Sondheim's rewritten The Glamorous Life for the film version of Little Night Music is another example.

  37. JohnMor

    Hardly. Remember Grace Kelly?

    Also, royalty isn’t confined to a monarch’s immediate family, British or otherwise.

    And of course, tecReplyhnically you're right. But UK Royalty was implicit in my comment. But I guess Monaco's 'Royalty' is a tad more respectable than, say, the murderers who make up the so-called Saudi Arabian 'Royalty'.

  38. Thomas T

    Actually I prefer the rewritten film version of the song Sweet Charity to the stage version of it. It's that rare instance of a film improving on a song from the stage version. Sondheim's rewritten The Glamorous Life for the film version of Little Night Music is another example.

    I completely agree on both songs.

  39. I agree with Matt… the lost songs were much better than those that replaced them. Mr. Burns is very talented but the broadway arrangements for the score were much better. (And it has one of best overtures ever) It always sounded to me like they were trying to imitate Burt Bacharach in terms of arrangements. I will admit a prejudice as the cast album was one of the first I ever owned and I found those for the film disappointing. Again…. aside from the Fosse choreography I am not a fan of the film. Not here to argue. But here is a topic to debate: did Universal ever make a good musical?

  40. Jim*Tod

    I agree with Matt… the lost songs were much better than those that replaced them. Mr. Burns is very talented but the broadway arrangements for the score were much better. (And it has one of best overtures ever) It always sounded to me like they were trying to imitate Burt Bacharach in terms of arrangements. I will admit a prejudice as the cast album was one of the first I ever owned and I found those for the film disappointing. Again…. aside from the Fosse choreography I am not a fan of the film. Not here to argue. But here is a topic to debate: did Universal ever make a good musical?

    I am fond of this, Thoroughly Modern Millie and Flower Drum Song. But no, they are not my favorites. They all pretty much came out after musicals were dead as a common genre, and it's not like Universal ever had a Freed unit or something.

    I don't think anything's wrong with Sweet Charity now; but I believe it was self-victimized in its time. I believe there's somewhat of a disconnect between the book and the music. The book is a Neil Simon script, inspired by Fellini and Co., as told by Peter Stone. It's a little too wordy in places and this stops the film dead as a musical in the heavier moments. Would have made a fine straight drama. And all the musical numbers use a different type of musical narrative; played together in two hours, they're a little disjointed and not as good as the sum of their parts. But it's not nearly as dreadful as others seem to imply. Probably nobody's favorite film but doesn't deserve its reputation. (Doesn't help that Shirley MacLaine seems to disown the picture).

    Another example of its self-victimization is in its timing and marketing. It came out in the Spring of '69. The 60s were not quite over…we still had Woodstock and the moon landing as the decade's dual grand finales. Yet notice on the album cover and some marketing the film touts itself as the "musical of the 1970s." Nope. It was already dated before it hit theaters. Times and tastes were already changing. The film's editing style and the costumes and colors are very 60s. And not even 1969 60s. Obviously it was filmed in 1968 yet it seems to be set in 1967. Why does this even make a difference? Because styles, tastes, clothing–everything changed about every six months in those days. Everything they're wearing in this movie is already out of style. The marketing seems to imply some forward-thinking, however one can never predict the tastes of the future and this movie was already stick in the recent past. Even if the film had marketed itself as the "musical of today" it still wouldn't have made much of a difference! It's the Summer of Love baby, or else what the heck are those flower children doing in Central Park?

    But today? It does play like a perfect museum piece of 60s fashion, thought, values and cinematography. It works just fine as a period piece as long as someone shows it to you and reminds you, "This film takes place in 1967." Then everything seems to fall in line.

  41. Jim*Tod

    I agree with Matt… the lost songs were much better than those that replaced them. Mr. Burns is very talented but the broadway arrangements for the score were much better. (And it has one of best overtures ever) It always sounded to me like they were trying to imitate Burt Bacharach in terms of arrangements. I will admit a prejudice as the cast album was one of the first I ever owned and I found those for the film disappointing. Again…. aside from the Fosse choreography I am not a fan of the film. Not here to argue. But here is a topic to debate: did Universal ever make a good musical?

    Well, clearly you're trying to say they didn't. I would say the 1936 Showboat is rather excellent. And I've always been fond of Flower Drum Song despite it being studio bound and weighted down by the leaden choreography of Hermes Pan. But you can't top those Alfred Newman orchestrations. Many are fans of the Deanna Durbin musicals, too, some of which are quite charming.

  42. Jim*Tod

    I agree with Matt… the lost songs were much better than those that replaced them. Mr. Burns is very talented but the broadway arrangements for the score were much better. (And it has one of best overtures ever) It always sounded to me like they were trying to imitate Burt Bacharach in terms of arrangements. I will admit a prejudice as the cast album was one of the first I ever owned and I found those for the film disappointing. Again…. aside from the Fosse choreography I am not a fan of the film. Not here to argue. But here is a topic to debate: did Universal ever make a good musical?

    Well, clearly you're trying to say they didn't. I would say the 1936 Showboat is rather excellent. And I've always been fond of Flower Drum Song despite it being studio bound and weighted down by the leaden choreography of Hermes Pan. But you can't top those Alfred Newman orchestrations. Many are fans of the Deanna Durbin musicals, too, some of which are quite charming.

  43. Yep, Show Boat without question is a great musical. Deanna had some fine musicals, and Donald O'Connor and Peggy Ryan did their part for the B-unit. Except for those misguided dream ballets in Flower Drum Song (the serious one for "Love, Look Away" and the comic one for "Sunday"), I think the film improves on the stage version of Flower Drum Song with the placement and assignment of songs and the casting.

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