Star Trek Beyond Blu-ray Review

Solid Trek with a need for something 'new'. 4 Stars

Star Trek Beyond is the third film in the reboot series that take place in an alternate timeline of Kirk and crews early years (known as the Kelvin timeline). It’s a solid Star Trek film and an exciting action film that for many reason, some of which make sense and some that do not, failed to live up to Paramount’s lofty performance expectations. For this lifelong Star Trek fan, Beyond is a good film that captures the Trek spirit and is perhaps the best display of character interaction that we’ve seen from the crew in this timeline. But, despite a likeable script with good doses of humor from Simon Pegg (Scotty) and Doug Jung, there is a feeling that we’ve seen most of the ideas on display here before.

Star Trek Beyond (2016)
Released: 22 Jul 2016
Rated: PG-13
Runtime: 122 min
Director: Justin Lin
Genre: Action, Adventure, Sci-Fi
Cast: Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Karl Urban, Zoe Saldana
Writer(s): Simon Pegg, Doug Jung, Gene Roddenberry (television series "Star Trek")
Plot: The USS Enterprise crew explores the furthest reaches of uncharted space, where they encounter a new ruthless enemy who puts them and everything the Federation stands for to the test.
IMDB rating: 7.4
MetaScore: 68

Disc Information
Studio: Paramount
Distributed By: N/A
Video Resolution: 1080P/AVC
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
Audio: Dolby Atmos, English 7.1 Dolby TrueHD, Other
Subtitles: English SDH, Spanish, French, Other
Rating: PG-13
Run Time: 2 Hr. 2 Min.
Package Includes: Blu-ray, DVD, Digital Copy, UltraViolet
Case Type: Standard with Slip Sleeve
Disc Type: BD50 (dual layer)
Region: A
Release Date: 11/01/2016
MSRP: $39.99

The Production: 4/5

“It isn’t uncommon, you know? It’s easy to get lost. In the vastness of space, there’s only yourself, your ship, your crew.”

The routine and isolating nature of deep space exploration have begun to weigh on Captain Kirk (Chris Pine) and he finds himself at a crossroads, wondering if he’s doing the right thing. He and his crew are three years into their five year mission, and have a chance for some brief respite on the Yorktown, the United Federation of Planet’s most sophisticated and impressive Starbase (a neutral station where many different species can engage with the Federation and its mission of peace). However, when the survivor of an attack from the other side of an uncharted nebula require the skills and talents of Kirk and his crew, they are dispatched to investigate. But they are attacked by a superior force upon their arrival which destroys the Enterprise and captures almost the entire crew as they escape in pods. Only a few members of the senior staff remain free on the nearby planet surface and they must work together to free their shipmates and put an end to the architect of their deadly predicament, Krall (Idris Elba).

Star Trek Beyond achieves a tone and delivers a storyline most aligned with Trek creator Rodenberry’s Original Series. A menacing villain, the crew out of their elements, and a ticking clock to save the day are all core, but something about Beyond managed to rekindle the spirit of The Original Series in a way that the two previous, JJ Abrams directed installments had not. That isn’t to say the two previous films didn’t strongly echo The Original Series. Through exemplary casting and a general dashing sense of derring-do tales, Star Trek and its sequel Star Trek Into Darkness were high adventure and earnest attempts to bring Star Trek out of mothballs on the big screen and create a thriving, mega budget franchise for Paramount. But Beyond clearly sought to emphasize and echo the classic series in a more pronounced way.

Where Star Trek Beyond succeeds unequivocally is in the many small character moments. The screenplay by Simon Pegg and Doug Jung gives breathing room to quiet moments of reflection and dialogue that matter considerably to well-versed Trek fans. They also provide the bedrock of humanity that matters when you then need to imperil your heroes. A shame then that these moments aren’t a part of a stronger overall plotline. Krall’s villainous pursuit against all that the Federation stands for provides ample reason for Kirk, who is having a crisis of purpose, to evaluate not only the importance of his work with the Federation among the stars, but of his unique purpose among there; why he is out there and the difference that he, and his crew in particular have, can and will make. That resonates.

Director Justin Lin handles the film’s demands very capably, taking over from J.J. Abrams who directed the two prior films. Lin’s directorial style is defined largely by flourishes in camera movements and he has a solid command of scene construction and flow, but it is his bias toward a fluid use of the camera that are best found in shots of the Enterprise that are signature. Some found these flourishes distracting, but that’s quite unfair. Key moments from earlier Star Trek films have given special reverence to the Enterprise, from the lengthy and majestic shots of the ship in The Motion Picture to the ‘stealing the enterprise’ sequence from The Search for Spock. And Lin’s approach, aided with the freedom of today’s visual effects, seems to me to be a continuation of that love and reverence of the iconic ship.

Lin’s fluidity of camera movements, at times wonderfully (to me) disorientating as it floats and flies by and through the structures of the magnificent ship is a special kind of reverence to the largest member of the crew – and throughout the wonderfully staged destruction of the USS Enterprise (again), Lin treats one of cinema’s most recognizable ships (designs) with respect as she’s torn apart piece by piece. In fact, aside from the understandable grumble that Kirk’s ships is once again destroyed, this sequence at the beginning of Star Trek Beyond is one of the best – in terms of excitement and thrill – of the three reboot films. And here the destruction isn’t for the sake of spectacle for a finale. It’s a necessary move to separate and strand the crew, forcing them to fight to come back together, stronger, on the planet surface against a fortified enemy and great internal and external uncertainty. It is perhaps the most necessary destruction of the Enterprise that we’ve seen (barring the close of Star Trek III I’d say).

The entire cast is in fine form, with each of them, Karl Urban’s Bones and Chris Pine’s Kirk in particular, showing themselves to be the most comfortable so far in the legendary roles. Anton Yelchin, who would sadly pass away before the film premiered, is bittersweet to watch as Chekov, as he demonstrates his ease at being in tune with the character he very much made his own. The two major new characters in Beyond, Idris Elba’s Krall and Sofia Boutella’s Jaylah, are fine additions, with Boutella’s Jaylah feeling the most fresh and energetic new face of the reboot series. Elba is commanding as Krall despite being underwritten in places and having a rationale that, when revealed, isn’t entirely convincing. Still, Elba imposes behind the layers of make-up effects (as does Boutella) making a solid, if not great, antagonist.

Right now, the reboot series is in a precarious place. Having alienated a relatively small quotient of Trek fans at the onset of a ‘reboot’, it managed to find new audiences and became a sizeable franchise hit. With the very expensive follow-up, Into Darkness, while still being a huge global box office success, it proved a misstep in retreading the Wrath of Khan idea and struggled to find the right tone for the Trek universe. The third film, perhaps under the weight of less than stellar reception to Into Darkness, had some bad press with the shifting writers and directors, and then severely under-marketed the film (and when a teaser did come, disappointed fans and even the film’s writer by selling the wrong tone of the film). These new missteps, along with Paramount failing to properly recognize and celebrate the 50th anniversary of Star Trek, all conspired against the film. Unfair, sure, but that’s show business. So now we wonder where Trek on the big screen can go from here – if at all. I firmly believe we’ll see more, but the challenge of cracking the right story that bridges the needs of a Trek film with the desire to broaden (or keep that broadened) audience will be a heavy and tough burden.

Video: 5/5

3D Rating: NA

Video-wise, Star Trek Beyond is incredibly strong. Deep blacks of night and space offer excellent contrasting details of the Enterprise. Set and costume details are very strong, with the bright colors of uniforms, the bright greens of planet vegetation (and the differing color rock formations and rocky surfaces) proving to be very, very good. Skin tones are natural and while the sequence on the crashed saucer section of the Enterprise appears quite dark, it does resemble how the sequence looked when I saw it in the theater and so, given the unstable and low-lit nature of the scene, appears accurate of intent.

Audio: 5/5

Paramount supplies the latest Star Trek feature with a Dolby Atmos track (which defaults as 7.1 Dolby TrueHD for those not equipped with Atmos). It’s good. As a rambunctious action film with a number of well-staged action sequences it is perhaps unsurprising that the audio would deliver with active surround effects, deeply felt bass and crisp front and center audio. The Enterprise destruction sequence is fully immersive, as is the finale which, in its first phase, is dominated with music that works surprisingly well (I won’t spoil what or how) and fills the speakers entirely.

Special Features: 3.5/5

A decent collection of special features accompanies Star Trek Beyond on Blu-ray, but those available on the disc are incomplete. A commentary track is available on the iTunes version, and several retailer exclusives mean that Paramount has not learned from the debacle of special features spread across multiple retailer exclusive releases for Star Trek Into Darkness. What will come standard on the disc is still quite good, with the close look at the Yorktown and the tribute to late Leonard Nimoy and Anton Yelchin standing out to me.

Deleted Scenes – Go Beyond the final cut of the movie with scenes you didn’t see in theaters.

Beyond the Darkness – Meet visionary producer J.J. Abrams, director Justin Lin and co-writers Simon Pegg and Doug Jung as they discuss the inspiration for the Star Trek Beyond storyline and how it came to life.

Enterprise Takedown – Experience edge-of-your-seat action and see how a shocking attack destroys the USS Enterprise.

Divided and Conquered – Learn how filmmakers pushed the boundaries in Star Trek Beyond by forcing the Enterprise crew into their most challenging situations yet.

A Warped Sense of Revenge – Meet Star Trek‘s newest villain, Krall, as actor Idris Elba reveals the backstory behind his character’s terrifying ambitions.

Trekking in the Desert – Go on set to Dubai and discover how its futuristic architecture became the foundation for the most innovative Starbase yet.

Exploring Strange New Worlds – Tour the incredible production sets of Star Trek Beyond with director Justin Lin.

New Life, New Civilizations – See how special effects designers met the challenge to create an unprecedented 50 new alien species for the film to celebrate Star Trek‘s 50th Anniversary.

To Live Long and Prosper – Journey through the past 50 years of Star Trek with J.J. Abrams and the cast as they reflect on the evolution of this iconic sci-fi series.

For Leonard and Anton – Watch a touching tribute to the legendary Leonard Nimoy and beloved crew member Anton Yelchin.

Gag Reel – Join in on the fun with this hilarious gag reel of on-set bloopers.

Feature film in standard definition

Digital (UV and iTunes) version of the film.

Overall: 4/5

Star Trek Beyond is perhaps the most reminiscent of The Original Series for the three reboot films. While I think it is a step behind 2009’s Star Trek – as that film had a much tougher mountain to climb and was able to do so with excellence and high adventure – Beyond is more comfortable and confident of its Star Trek roots than Into Darkness, which felt at odds with itself (though still a good action picture).

As entertaining as Star Trek Beyond is, I don’t know that it will be remembered as one of the best Star Trek films. It hits the right tone, has impressive action beats, and contains plenty of references that those of us steeped in the language of Rodenberry’s universe will enjoy and, at times, smile broadly when catching. And it even has a story with room for character contemplation of the larger meaning of things – but it doesn’t have that final, elusive element that made the very best Star Trek films resonate in the broader consciousness. And I can’t for sure say what that final ingredient is – it’s just something that is perhaps created by a film when all the other elements come together in a certain, special way. Star Trek Beyond is lovingly produced and expertly made – and yes, it’s both a good Star Trek film and a good action film, but it isn’t one of the greats.

Published by

Neil Middlemiss

administrator

34 Comments

  1. Nice Review Neil, as usual.

    I'll be picking this up for sure. I agree with your review in regards to Lin and the screenwriters trying and succeeding in evoking the spirit of TOS. I do want to see this film again having only seen it once in the theater. I'll be curious to see those shot of the Enterprise that your review refers to. Though I much prefer the design of the Motion Picture Enterprise you have at the top of the review. 🙂

    I think it's a bit unfair that the studios place these Star Wars like goals for box office for these films to reach. This franchise is pretty popular, but I don't think it ever could surpass Star Wars as much as I'd like it to. So for future films, I agree there will be more. Lets hope the TPTB carries on with more with this kind of flavor. Maybe Lin can come back even though he didn't seem interested to.

  2. Nope, pass. Paramount gets nothing from me on this one, even the 3D version. I am too pissed off at the studio for relegating a commentary track to an iTunes purchase, meaning I can't hold a physical disc in my hands that contains it. Screw you, studios, for your online and retailer exclusives. Is there any wonder that we don't trust corporations as far as we can spit?

  3. For what it's worth, the Blu-ray contains a coupon allowing the purchaser to get the iTunes version for free – so anyone purchasing the BD will have access to the commentary without the need for an additional purchase. It's less than ideal but is better than requiring a double dip.

  4. Thanks Neil!

    This will be a purchase later down the road. I wasn't excited for the movie, felt it was "fine" (aside, as you mentioned, the character moments) but forgot it almost instantly. Nothing is compelling me to watch it again right now.

  5. Thanks Neil!

    This will be a purchase later down the road. I wasn't excited for the movie, felt it was "fine" (aside, as you mentioned, the character moments) but forgot it almost instantly. Nothing is compelling me to watch it again right now.

  6. Neil:

    Thanks for a great review.

    This is a blind buy for me.  I've seen the other films in the recent series and liked them…so this is a no-brainer for this casual Trek fan.  I just didn't get to it in the theater this summer. 

    I'm sure I'll like it…and your review pretty much cinches it for me.

    I'm especially glad to hear about the Atmos soundtrack.  Any Atmos track I've got has sounded exceptionally good to me on my non-Atmos system.   I understand the logistics (limitations) of the situation but believe there is something in the sauce which lifts the mixes into a better place.

  7. Mike, I think you'll like it a lot. It's a lighter and more fun movie than the previous one, the cast is great in it, and if you're familiar with the original show there are some nice winks and nods to it. The interactions between the crew felt very much inspired by the original show to me. I'm looking forward to seeing it again very soon!

  8. For what it's worth, the Blu-ray contains a coupon allowing the purchaser to get the iTunes version for free – so anyone purchasing the BD will have access to the commentary without the need for an additional purchase. It's less than ideal but is better than requiring a double dip.

    Unless, like me, one does not have, and will never use iTunes.

    Minor quibble for me, though.  I'm still buying this BD.

  9. Unless, like me, one does not have, and will never use iTunes.

    Minor quibble for me, though.  I'm still buying this BD.

    That's entirely a user's choice, of course, and it's certainly not my place to talk you into something you're against. But just speaking for myself, it's a free program. I already have it so this is a no brainier for me. But when Star Trek Into Darkness came out on disc, there were some Best Buy exclusive online bonus features that could be accessed for free on what was then their iTunes-like program. I downloaded it for free, watched the bonus material, and never used it again. For Star Trek Beyond, it's the same deal with iTunes. I just wanted to make sure that info was available to anyone who could benefit from it.

  10. That's entirely a user's choice…

    Yeah, I'm a luddite with no interest in downloading music so I don't have iTunes but by buying the disc, I am given an option to get the commentary. It's lame that it isn't on the disc but if I don't hear it, I've only got myself to blame.

  11. For anyone purchasing the 3D edition, did yours come with a slipcase?  (Or did you happen to see it in the store with a slipcase even if you didn't actually buy the 3D version?) Amazon's product description seems to indicate that it should, and yet, mine didn't have one.

  12. For anyone purchasing the 3D edition, did yours come with a slipcase?  (Or did you happen to see it in the store with a slipcase even if you didn't actually buy the 3D version?) Amazon's product description seems to indicate that it should, and yet, mine didn't have one.

    My 3-D copy had a slipcase but I got it from Target.

  13. Thanks Travis. I wrote to Amazon and they agreed to send me a new copy with the slipcase, so fingers crossed. For most things I wouldn't care as much, but darn it, I have slipcases for all the reboot Treks and I want this one to match!

  14. So My ST: Beyond Bluray came by UPS today and …

    In the store it appeared there ere two cover variant's one with Robert Pine's kid on the front and the other with Zachary Quinto … You may want to open the package from the top as the images are of the "Collectable" character cards & they are just reversed for the Quinto version, The slipcover is plastic and has a clear area for the cards to show through.

    Interestingly the blu-ray case itself says Blu-Ray 3D where the standard blu-ray logo is … but the insert in the case says BLU-RAY + DVD +DIGITAL HD inside the case are three discs … A Bluray that says * Feature Film *Special Features.

    As second Blu-ray disc that says:* Special Features

    And most important for those of us who have blu-ray players: A DVD of the FEATURE FILM :rock::dance::banana::dancing-banana-04::drum:

  15. Neil; You changed the image above from the TMP refit Enterprise to the JJprise! 🙂

    I did. There was apparently an issue with the first cast picture I used, and the image was changed to a cool shot of the Enterprise, but from the wrong timeline (as you correctly noted) so I found another ship shot that I liked from the right timeline 🙂

  16. Watched STAR TREK BEYOND or the first time in 3D Blu-ray Atmos.

    Fairly decent Star Trek film.  Far better than the second film (which was a remake of Khan), but for me, a bit too long despite some pretty damn good action sequences.

    The 3D was no big shakes.  While, at times, it added spaciousness to the ship or planet environments, it felt mostly flat for most of the film.   I really don't see how 3D added anything spectacular to this viewing.

    The Dolby Atmos was very good.  The sound team did some nice overhead mixing that I was able to pick out during the presentation. 

    In all, a favorable Star Trek film.

  17. I watched the 2D blu-ray last night. I did have a look at the 3D disc for the first 15 minutes. I was saying in another thread about this blu-ray that my eyes don't always work for 3D. Though I did see some depth, it wasn't a real eye popper as Ron said. ( I'll have a look at more scenes though, I'm curious. :). ).

    I also wasn't having any issues with the presentation being dark as some have commented on. I think it's not an overly brightly lit movie in particular scenes so it wasn't a distraction to me.

    I thought this was the best of the three films as it felt the most like TOS. But it was also a TOS film homage in some ways as the TOS film series was made during the TNG era. So I noticed it was more a team effort. Not that it wasn't during the series, it's just that during the TOS film era, we see the supporting cast used more then during the series. I also had a crazy thought that this film sort of felt like The Doomsday Machine in terms of a situation where Kirk has to get the wrecked Constellation (Franklin in the film ) to move again and use it stop the menace from wrecking havoc in innocent people in its path.

    One thing though, I noticed that this iteration of Spock never deals with his outsider, alienated aspect Nimoy Spock does. It's really more surface as far as I can see so far. Not as deep a characterization. I know he's still a younger version still growing into being what Spock became. But it felt like something was missing. It wasn't terrible, and Quinto is trying. Urban is good as McCoy, but I still think they wrote his part with too much of what McCoy sometimes would say or do. It was a bit of an exaggeration. I feel that Pine's Kirk has small flashes of classic Kirk. But he felt like he still isn't all here yet. His Lack of enthusiasm for the mission felt wrong, but I can see it's was the screen writers way to make the character see that he loves his mission and his role as part of this crew.

    Since this was the second time seeing the film since seeing it once at the cinema, I noticed the Enterprise A is actually a new design. In looking at it on the blu-ray, it does feel less clown like and more like the TOS version in the proportion of the engines and how they are spread out more then too close like the 2009 version. Though as a designer myself, I find that the more they tweak the design in each film, the more it's about design for design sake. The design just doesn't feel like it's trying to solve a problem. Jeffries original TOS design had reasons for doing it the way it was done and is still a beauty. The Motion Picture version took it to another level to feel more real. I'll be curious how the design looks in the next film when we get to really see it. It does feel less about style and more purpose designed. Of course none of these ship designs going back to TOS are anything real. It's all speculative and conceptual.

  18. Watched the film for the first time today.  (2D presentation)  Pretty enjoyable Trek film, all an all.  I definitely enjoyed it more than the second film, but once again we see an SF franchise film that features the 'big bad' that must be stopped.  A little silly at times, but not distractingly so.  A little bit tough seeing Chekov in the film and being reminded of Anton Yelchin's untimely passing, but what can you do?

    Pretty much in agreement with Nelson's observations on the crew and the design of the Enterprise.  (BTW, Good observation about the episode The Doomsday Machine.)  The ST: TOS design has the advantage of being what I grew up with, but I do find myself preferring the cleaner lines of Jefferies' vision vs. latter designs that feel like they were influenced by Star Wars (in terms of surface detail which seems to feature more nooks and crannies, etc.)

    I am kind of getting tired of the megalomaniac who must be stopped as the plot device in contemporary blockbusters (all three Star Trek films and almost all of the Marvel franchise films immediately come to mind.)  Just seems to be part and parcel of the genre these days.

    One thing kind of confused me, but maybe I missed the plot element / dialog pertaining to this situation in the film.  I'll spoilerize it for anyone who hasn't seen the film…

    SPOILER
    Jayla uses projectors to hide the location / existence of the Franklin.  We later find out that Krall was the captain of the Franklin.  It seems like he would be aware of its existence and location.  Did he forget, or simply not care at this point?  Otherwise, how could Jayla's house remain secret?

    – Walter.

  19. I just saw this for the first time. I "enjoyed" much of it, but as the majority of this outing was awash in artificial excitement galore, I stand by my provisional quotation marks. Whatever Star Trek once represented ("The Corbomite Maneuver," "Let That Be Your Last Battlefield," "Charlie X" etc.) is now long-gone.

    Later in the film, as I felt the grip of mediocrity slowly squeezing my brain into a premature stroke, I was finally taken out by a burst of Beastie Boys music. I was left sucking my thumb in a Mr. Spock bath robe.

    Whatever direction they go with the next one, where Jim Kirk meets his dead father Thor, I am now quite sure it will be the stupidest shit ever put on film.

    I'll give it the Lt. Frank Drebin summation: "It's like eating a spoonful of Drano; sure, it'll clean you out, but it'll leave you hollow inside."

  20. I also watched this for the first time a few days ago, and while I enjoyed it overall it could have been much better. Another Enterprise destruction tale? Come on! IMO anyone who bitched and moaned about the rehash of Khan Into Darkness brought us should be just as outraged that the producers of Beyond were so bereft of original thought that they resorted to killing the old girl – AGAIN. What I did like was the character interaction, the Yorktown station, Krall's technology, and Kaylah. Could have done without the motorcycle bit all together, and the whole backstory of Krall and his two cohorts was lame. The Enterprise crew is in year three of their five year mission to "boldly go", new worlds and new civilizations and all, and THIS is what they find as an antagonist? Lazy IMO. Still, despite the faults I find that there's something strangely compelling about the Kelvin timeline and its characters, and I like all three films well enough. The scores are *excellent* too.

    I watched the 2D Blu-ray and unlike some others, I found that on my ISF-calibrated 55" Panny plasma/Oppo BDP-103 setup many of the effects and space shots had lousy black levels. They looked grayish and washed out, not dark at all. Other scenes in the film looked just fine. Very strange.

  21. Neil:

    Thanks for a great review.

    This is a blind buy for me.  I've seen the other films in the recent series and liked them…so this is a no-brainer for this casual Trek fan.  I just didn't get to it in the theater this summer. 

    I'm sure I'll like it…and your review pretty much cinches it for me.

    I'm especially glad to hear about the Atmos soundtrack.  Any Atmos track I've got has sounded exceptionally good to me on my non-Atmos system.   I understand the logistics (limitations) of the situation but believe there is something in the sauce which lifts the mixes into a better place.

  22. Come on! IMO anyone who bitched and moaned about the rehash of Khan Into Darkness brought us should be just as outraged that the producers of Beyond were so bereft of original thought that they resorted to killing the old girl – AGAIN.

    Yeah, I didn't really think about it too much during the film, but you raise a valid point.  Destroying the big E provides an opportunity for some spectacle, plus they get to roll out a new design every so often.  (Think of the merchandising opportunities and the sales of new model kits to the fans. 🙂 )

    – Walter.

  23. Yeah, I didn't really think about it too much during the film, but you raise a valid point.  Destroying the big E provides an opportunity for some spectacle, plus they get to roll out a new design every so often.  (Think of the merchandising opportunities and the sales of new model kits to the fans. 🙂 )

    – Walter.

    If this were the 1970s, I'd agree, but modelkits are far from a going concern marketing-wise. Plus the marketing on BEYOND was almost nonexistent (not even a tie-in novel, and the only making-of is something from the UK that isn't even out yet), so again par isn't really exploiting this resource in the ways you'd think obvious.

    I think this was a very valid way to kill the ship, to spend a lot of time on it and make you feel it, piece by piece, as opposed to ST3, where you have a self-destruct that doesn't blow up everything for miles but instead conveniently just fizzle-pops (when we've heard for years that when a starship goes, it goes big, hopefully taking LOTS of nearby combatants with it.)

  24. Mike, I think you'll like it a lot. It's a lighter and more fun movie than the previous one, the cast is great in it, and if you're familiar with the original show there are some nice winks and nods to it. The interactions between the crew felt very much inspired by the original show to me. I'm looking forward to seeing it again very soon!

  25. For what it's worth, the Blu-ray contains a coupon allowing the purchaser to get the iTunes version for free – so anyone purchasing the BD will have access to the commentary without the need for an additional purchase. It's less than ideal but is better than requiring a double dip.

    Unless, like me, one does not have, and will never use iTunes.

    Minor quibble for me, though.  I'm still buying this BD.

  26. Unless, like me, one does not have, and will never use iTunes.

    Minor quibble for me, though.  I'm still buying this BD.

    That's entirely a user's choice, of course, and it's certainly not my place to talk you into something you're against. But just speaking for myself, it's a free program. I already have it so this is a no brainier for me. But when Star Trek Into Darkness came out on disc, there were some Best Buy exclusive online bonus features that could be accessed for free on what was then their iTunes-like program. I downloaded it for free, watched the bonus material, and never used it again. For Star Trek Beyond, it's the same deal with iTunes. I just wanted to make sure that info was available to anyone who could benefit from it.

  27. Here is an issue I had with the film….

    SPOILER
    Confusing about the death of Ambassador Spock and the affect it has on young Spock.  It's not Spock's father who died.  It's future Spock himself who died.  That's a tough pill to swallow knowing your own death.  Somehow that's not reflected in the reactions given.

  28. That's entirely a user's choice…

    Yeah, I'm a luddite with no interest in downloading music so I don't have iTunes but by buying the disc, I am given an option to get the commentary. It's lame that it isn't on the disc but if I don't hear it, I've only got myself to blame.

  29. Jayla uses projectors to hide the location / existence of the Franklin. We later find out that Krall was the captain of the Franklin. It seems like he would be aware of its existence and location. Did he forget, or simply not care at this point? Otherwise, how could Jayla's house remain secret?

    As far as Krall is concerned, the ship is there but is useless – there's no way for him to use it for escape on their initial crashing. (Scotty points out that he probably can't get the ship to launch, and it's probably years of Jaylah attempting repairs and Scotty's engineering knowledge that's about a hundred years more advanced than the Franklin that makes launching it possible.) And Krall's mission also changes – he's not interested in mere escape, he's looking for the biological weapon that he can use against the federation as a whole.

    But Jaylah doesn't know that the Franklin once belonged to Krall, and probably assumes it belonged to one of his victims. Since she's kept her whereabouts and the ship hidden, Krall probably never imagines that she'd be there, and if he knew, he wouldn't care because she's just squatting in a worthless wreck as far as he's concerned.

  30. The two questions that stuck out to me when watching it were:

    1) How did Kirk and co. get out of the way of the saucer section flipping over on them on the planet so quickly when they went to retrieve the artifact at night?

    2) What happened to Scotty when he crashed the torpedo on the planet.  One shot we see him dangling off the cliff by one hand while the torpedo crashes down 1,000 ft below, the next time we see him, he's rummaging through the torpedo wreckage.  Sure the inference is there, but it's a bit of a stretch.

  31. For anyone purchasing the 3D edition, did yours come with a slipcase?  (Or did you happen to see it in the store with a slipcase even if you didn't actually buy the 3D version?) Amazon's product description seems to indicate that it should, and yet, mine didn't have one.

  32. For anyone purchasing the 3D edition, did yours come with a slipcase?  (Or did you happen to see it in the store with a slipcase even if you didn't actually buy the 3D version?) Amazon's product description seems to indicate that it should, and yet, mine didn't have one.

    My 3-D copy had a slipcase but I got it from Target.

  33. Thanks Travis. I wrote to Amazon and they agreed to send me a new copy with the slipcase, so fingers crossed. For most things I wouldn't care as much, but darn it, I have slipcases for all the reboot Treks and I want this one to match!

  34. So My ST: Beyond Bluray came by UPS today and …

    In the store it appeared there ere two cover variant's one with Robert Pine's kid on the front and the other with Zachary Quinto … You may want to open the package from the top as the images are of the "Collectable" character cards & they are just reversed for the Quinto version, The slipcover is plastic and has a clear area for the cards to show through.

    Interestingly the blu-ray case itself says Blu-Ray 3D where the standard blu-ray logo is … but the insert in the case says BLU-RAY + DVD +DIGITAL HD inside the case are three discs … A Bluray that says * Feature Film *Special Features.

    As second Blu-ray disc that says:* Special Features

    And most important for those of us who have blu-ray players: A DVD of the FEATURE FILM :rock::dance::banana::dancing-banana-04::drum:

  35. Neil; You changed the image above from the TMP refit Enterprise to the JJprise! 🙂

    I did. There was apparently an issue with the first cast picture I used, and the image was changed to a cool shot of the Enterprise, but from the wrong timeline (as you correctly noted) so I found another ship shot that I liked from the right timeline 🙂

  36. Watched STAR TREK BEYOND or the first time in 3D Blu-ray Atmos.

    Fairly decent Star Trek film.  Far better than the second film (which was a remake of Khan), but for me, a bit too long despite some pretty damn good action sequences.

    The 3D was no big shakes.  While, at times, it added spaciousness to the ship or planet environments, it felt mostly flat for most of the film.   I really don't see how 3D added anything spectacular to this viewing.

    The Dolby Atmos was very good.  The sound team did some nice overhead mixing that I was able to pick out during the presentation. 

    In all, a favorable Star Trek film.

  37. I watched the 2D blu-ray last night. I did have a look at the 3D disc for the first 15 minutes. I was saying in another thread about this blu-ray that my eyes don't always work for 3D. Though I did see some depth, it wasn't a real eye popper as Ron said. ( I'll have a look at more scenes though, I'm curious. :). ).

    I also wasn't having any issues with the presentation being dark as some have commented on. I think it's not an overly brightly lit movie in particular scenes so it wasn't a distraction to me.

    I thought this was the best of the three films as it felt the most like TOS. But it was also a TOS film homage in some ways as the TOS film series was made during the TNG era. So I noticed it was more a team effort. Not that it wasn't during the series, it's just that during the TOS film era, we see the supporting cast used more then during the series. I also had a crazy thought that this film sort of felt like The Doomsday Machine in terms of a situation where Kirk has to get the wrecked Constellation (Franklin in the film ) to move again and use it stop the menace from wrecking havoc in innocent people in its path.

    One thing though, I noticed that this iteration of Spock never deals with his outsider, alienated aspect Nimoy Spock does. It's really more surface as far as I can see so far. Not as deep a characterization. I know he's still a younger version still growing into being what Spock became. But it felt like something was missing. It wasn't terrible, and Quinto is trying. Urban is good as McCoy, but I still think they wrote his part with too much of what McCoy sometimes would say or do. It was a bit of an exaggeration. I feel that Pine's Kirk has small flashes of classic Kirk. But he felt like he still isn't all here yet. His Lack of enthusiasm for the mission felt wrong, but I can see it's was the screen writers way to make the character see that he loves his mission and his role as part of this crew.

    Since this was the second time seeing the film since seeing it once at the cinema, I noticed the Enterprise A is actually a new design. In looking at it on the blu-ray, it does feel less clown like and more like the TOS version in the proportion of the engines and how they are spread out more then too close like the 2009 version. Though as a designer myself, I find that the more they tweak the design in each film, the more it's about design for design sake. The design just doesn't feel like it's trying to solve a problem. Jeffries original TOS design had reasons for doing it the way it was done and is still a beauty. The Motion Picture version took it to another level to feel more real. I'll be curious how the design looks in the next film when we get to really see it. It does feel less about style and more purpose designed. Of course none of these ship designs going back to TOS are anything real. It's all speculative and conceptual.

  38. Watched the film for the first time today.  (2D presentation)  Pretty enjoyable Trek film, all an all.  I definitely enjoyed it more than the second film, but once again we see an SF franchise film that features the 'big bad' that must be stopped.  A little silly at times, but not distractingly so.  A little bit tough seeing Chekov in the film and being reminded of Anton Yelchin's untimely passing, but what can you do?

    Pretty much in agreement with Nelson's observations on the crew and the design of the Enterprise.  (BTW, Good observation about the episode The Doomsday Machine.)  The ST: TOS design has the advantage of being what I grew up with, but I do find myself preferring the cleaner lines of Jefferies' vision vs. latter designs that feel like they were influenced by Star Wars (in terms of surface detail which seems to feature more nooks and crannies, etc.)

    I am kind of getting tired of the megalomaniac who must be stopped as the plot device in contemporary blockbusters (all three Star Trek films and almost all of the Marvel franchise films immediately come to mind.)  Just seems to be part and parcel of the genre these days.

    One thing kind of confused me, but maybe I missed the plot element / dialog pertaining to this situation in the film.  I'll spoilerize it for anyone who hasn't seen the film…

    SPOILER
    Jayla uses projectors to hide the location / existence of the Franklin.  We later find out that Krall was the captain of the Franklin.  It seems like he would be aware of its existence and location.  Did he forget, or simply not care at this point?  Otherwise, how could Jayla's house remain secret?

    – Walter.

  39. I just saw this for the first time. I "enjoyed" much of it, but as the majority of this outing was awash in artificial excitement galore, I stand by my provisional quotation marks. Whatever Star Trek once represented ("The Corbomite Maneuver," "Let That Be Your Last Battlefield," "Charlie X" etc.) is now long-gone.

    Later in the film, as I felt the grip of mediocrity slowly squeezing my brain into a premature stroke, I was finally taken out by a burst of Beastie Boys music. I was left sucking my thumb in a Mr. Spock bath robe.

    Whatever direction they go with the next one, where Jim Kirk meets his dead father Thor, I am now quite sure it will be the stupidest shit ever put on film.

    I'll give it the Lt. Frank Drebin summation: "It's like eating a spoonful of Drano; sure, it'll clean you out, but it'll leave you hollow inside."

  40. I also watched this for the first time a few days ago, and while I enjoyed it overall it could have been much better. Another Enterprise destruction tale? Come on! IMO anyone who bitched and moaned about the rehash of Khan Into Darkness brought us should be just as outraged that the producers of Beyond were so bereft of original thought that they resorted to killing the old girl – AGAIN. What I did like was the character interaction, the Yorktown station, Krall's technology, and Kaylah. Could have done without the motorcycle bit all together, and the whole backstory of Krall and his two cohorts was lame. The Enterprise crew is in year three of their five year mission to "boldly go", new worlds and new civilizations and all, and THIS is what they find as an antagonist? Lazy IMO. Still, despite the faults I find that there's something strangely compelling about the Kelvin timeline and its characters, and I like all three films well enough. The scores are *excellent* too.

    I watched the 2D Blu-ray and unlike some others, I found that on my ISF-calibrated 55" Panny plasma/Oppo BDP-103 setup many of the effects and space shots had lousy black levels. They looked grayish and washed out, not dark at all. Other scenes in the film looked just fine. Very strange.

  41. Come on! IMO anyone who bitched and moaned about the rehash of Khan Into Darkness brought us should be just as outraged that the producers of Beyond were so bereft of original thought that they resorted to killing the old girl – AGAIN.

    Yeah, I didn't really think about it too much during the film, but you raise a valid point.  Destroying the big E provides an opportunity for some spectacle, plus they get to roll out a new design every so often.  (Think of the merchandising opportunities and the sales of new model kits to the fans. 🙂 )

    – Walter.

  42. Yeah, I didn't really think about it too much during the film, but you raise a valid point.  Destroying the big E provides an opportunity for some spectacle, plus they get to roll out a new design every so often.  (Think of the merchandising opportunities and the sales of new model kits to the fans. 🙂 )

    – Walter.

    If this were the 1970s, I'd agree, but modelkits are far from a going concern marketing-wise. Plus the marketing on BEYOND was almost nonexistent (not even a tie-in novel, and the only making-of is something from the UK that isn't even out yet), so again par isn't really exploiting this resource in the ways you'd think obvious.

    I think this was a very valid way to kill the ship, to spend a lot of time on it and make you feel it, piece by piece, as opposed to ST3, where you have a self-destruct that doesn't blow up everything for miles but instead conveniently just fizzle-pops (when we've heard for years that when a starship goes, it goes big, hopefully taking LOTS of nearby combatants with it.)

  43. Here is an issue I had with the film….

    SPOILER
    Confusing about the death of Ambassador Spock and the affect it has on young Spock.  It's not Spock's father who died.  It's future Spock himself who died.  That's a tough pill to swallow knowing your own death.  Somehow that's not reflected in the reactions given.

  44. Jayla uses projectors to hide the location / existence of the Franklin. We later find out that Krall was the captain of the Franklin. It seems like he would be aware of its existence and location. Did he forget, or simply not care at this point? Otherwise, how could Jayla's house remain secret?

    As far as Krall is concerned, the ship is there but is useless – there's no way for him to use it for escape on their initial crashing. (Scotty points out that he probably can't get the ship to launch, and it's probably years of Jaylah attempting repairs and Scotty's engineering knowledge that's about a hundred years more advanced than the Franklin that makes launching it possible.) And Krall's mission also changes – he's not interested in mere escape, he's looking for the biological weapon that he can use against the federation as a whole.

    But Jaylah doesn't know that the Franklin once belonged to Krall, and probably assumes it belonged to one of his victims. Since she's kept her whereabouts and the ship hidden, Krall probably never imagines that she'd be there, and if he knew, he wouldn't care because she's just squatting in a worthless wreck as far as he's concerned.

  45. The two questions that stuck out to me when watching it were:

    1) How did Kirk and co. get out of the way of the saucer section flipping over on them on the planet so quickly when they went to retrieve the artifact at night?

    2) What happened to Scotty when he crashed the torpedo on the planet.  One shot we see him dangling off the cliff by one hand while the torpedo crashes down 1,000 ft below, the next time we see him, he's rummaging through the torpedo wreckage.  Sure the inference is there, but it's a bit of a stretch.

  46. I really enjoyed this movie as I have the first two reboot and most of the original Trek movies.  I purchased this movie as soon as the 4K UHD Blu-ray came out.  So far I have all three Trek reboot films on 4K UHD and am looking forward to owning the original movies in 4K as well.  I don't have to worry about double dipping on the original movies from 1080p blu-ray because I was not able to get them yet so my upgrade would be from DVD's to 4K UHD if and when they are released.Very nice review.

  47. Here is an issue I had with the film….

    SPOILER
    Confusing about the death of Ambassador Spock and the affect it has on young Spock.  It's not Spock's father who died.  It's future Spock himself who died.  That's a tough pill to swallow knowing your own death.  Somehow that's not reflected in the reactions given.

    Ron

    SPOILER

    It's prime Spock that dies. So the young Spock doesn't know his own death, just the death of alternate universe/timeline Spock.

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