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THE ICONIC HORROR FAVORITE CELEBRATES ITS

30TH ANNIVERSARY


















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RETURNING TO 4K ULTRA HD™ WITH A

LIMITED EDITION STEELBOOK AND ADDED SPECIAL FEATURES

OCTOBER 4TH




















SYNOPSIS

From Academy Award®-winning director Francis Ford Coppola (1974 Best Director, The Godfather: Part II) comes the classic and chilling tale about the devastatingly seductive Transylvanian prince (Gary Oldman) who travels from Eastern Europe to 19th-century London in search of human love. When the charismatic Dracula meets Mina (Winona Ryder), a young woman who appears as the reincarnation of his lost love, the two embark on a journey of romantic passion and horror.

DISC DETAILS & BONUS MATERIALS

4K ULTRA HD DISC


  • Feature presented in 4K resolution with Dolby Vision, including the original theatrical English subtitle font for texted instances
  • Dolby Atmos audio + 5.1 + Dolby Stereo
  • Special Features:

    • NEWLY ADDED: “Love Song For A Vampire” Music Video by Annie Lennox
    • NEWLY ADDED: Blood Lines – Dracula: The Man, The Myth, The Movies Featurette



BLU-RAY DISC™


  • Feature presented in High Definition, sourced from the 4K master
  • Dolby Atmos audio
  • Special Features:

    • Audio Commentary featuring Director Francis Ford Coppola
    • Audio Commentary featuring Director Francis Ford Coppola, Visual Effects Director Roman Coppola and Makeup Supervisor Greg Cannom
    • Introduction by Francis Ford Coppola
    • Reflections in Blood: Francis Ford Coppola and Bram Stoker’s Dracula
    • Practical Magicians: A Collaboration Between Father and Son
    • The Blood Is the Life: The Making of Bram Stoker’s Dracula
    • The Costumes Are the Sets: The Design of Eiko Ishioka
    • In-Camera: Naïve Visual Effects
    • Method and Madness: Visualizing Dracula
    • Deleted & Extended Scenes
    • Theatrical Teaser & Trailer



CAST AND CREW

Directed By: Francis Ford Coppola

Screenplay By: James V. Hart

Produced by: Francis Ford Coppola, Fred Fuchs and Charles Mulvehill

Executive Producers: Michael Apted and Robert O’Connor

Cast: Gary Oldman, Winona Ryder, Anthony Hopkins, Keanu Reeves

SPECS

Run Time: Approx. 127 minutes

Rating: R for sexuality and horror violence

4K UHD Feature Picture: 2160p Ultra High Definition, 1.85:1

4K UHD Feature Audio: English Dolby Atmos (Dolby TrueHD 7.1 Compatible) | English 5.1 DTS-HD MA | English Stereo Surround DTS-HD MA

















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Published by

Ronald Epstein

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View thread (28 replies)

SD_Brian

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  • Feature presented in 4K resolution with Dolby Vision, including the original theatrical English subtitle font for texted instances

This, to me, is the major selling point of this release. The original subtitle font, which tied into the film's design aesthetic, was included on the laser disc. Every release since the DVD days has included those standard-issue block letter subtitles that distract from the movie.
 

Josh Dial

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I'll be double dipping on this. The Dolby Vision is a fine addition to be sure (assuming it's implemented well), but I'm simply a sucked for a beautiful steelbook. I agree with Brian that the original font is actually a major plus that shouldn't be ignored.
 

Bryan Tuck

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This, to me, is the major selling point of this release. The original subtitle font, which tied into the film's design aesthetic, was included on the laser disc. Every release since the DVD days has included those standard-issue block letter subtitles that distract from the movie.

I think the Superbit DVD had the theatrical sub font. But yeah, Blu-rays have all been the generic font. Glad to see Sony finally getting this.

I just wish Paramount and Disney would follow suit.
 

noel aguirre

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Does anyone know whether the director or cinematographer approved the transfer? I know Coppola usually is very involved with his other works transferred to home video but don’t know about this title and especially since it had the wrong subtitle font before.
 

uncledougie

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Michael Ballhaus passed away in 2017 per IMDb, so unless this version was done prior to that, that would be in question. If Coppola approved, one would assume all is well, but other director approved versions of films have been controversial (thinking William Friedkin here), so who knows if it will be widely admired? One would hope so because it has the potential to be very impressive.
 

Malcolm R

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Yes, "approved/supervised by the director/cinematographer" has been controversial over the past couple of decades as while the transfers may be "approved" they often look different than a prior "approved" transfer that was previously released (like Dean Cundey and the original Halloween).
 

JoshZ

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Yes, "approved/supervised by the director/cinematographer" has been controversial over the past couple of decades as while the transfers may be "approved" they often look different than a prior "approved" transfer that was previously released (like Dean Cundey and the original Halloween).

This is exactly what happened with the first Blu-ray release of Bram Stoker's Dracula in 2007, which had a desaturated and heavily contrasted transfer very different from what the film looked like theatrically. Allegedly, the look was based on some obscure answer print that only Francis Coppola himself had ever seen before or knew existed yet was supposedly "what I always wanted it to be."

That was so controversial that the later "Mastered in 4K" Blu-ray in 2015 and the first UItra HD in 2017 returned to something closer to the theatrical color grading.
 
Last edited:

Worth

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I used to think director/cinematographer input was a good thing, but the temptation to revise and "improve" on what was done is probably too great. Now I just wish the crew that handles the Warner Archive releases could scan and transfer every movie from every studio.
 

SD_Brian

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I think the Superbit DVD had the theatrical sub font. But yeah, Blu-rays have all been the generic font. Glad to see Sony finally getting this.
No, the Superbit DVD had the standard font too. I bought it as an upgrade to the original DVD release, hoping it would have the original font in addition to an improved picture, but it was just another chance for me to be disappointed. Same thing with the Special Edition DVD and both Blu Rays, then again with the original UHD. My god, will this really be my 7th time buying this damn movie?
 

Robert Saccone

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No, the Superbit DVD had the standard font too. I bought it as an upgrade to the original DVD release, hoping it would have the original font in addition to an improved picture, but it was just another chance for me to be disappointed. Same thing with the Special Edition DVD and both Blu Rays, then again with the original UHD. My god, will this really be my 7th time buying this damn movie?
My 8th if you count Laser Disc. 😂
 

JoshZ

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And I bought the super duper deluxe box set of the laserdisc, so that was over $120, as I recall, just for that one format.

The Criterion, or the "Special Collector's Edition"? :)


 

Malcolm R

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The Criterion, or the "Special Collector's Edition"? :)


The Criterion. I still remember buying it at the Media Play store in the Mall of New Hampshire and debating if it was worth the money. "Oh, well, this is probably the best edition we'll ever get and I'll have it forever."

I'm not sure I ever watched those discs more than once. But I do still have it. :laugh:
 

SD_Brian

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The Criterion, or the "Special Collector's Edition"? :)


I just had the plain old vanilla version...though it did claim to be "Deluxe" because side three was CAV so I could freeze frame through the last half hour of the movie! Granted, like, 10 minutes of that half hour were the end credits, but still!

https://www.lddb.com/laserdisc/04986/51416/Bram-Stokers-Dracula
 

Robert Saccone

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The Criterion, or the "Special Collector's Edition"? :)


Whoops had both of those 9 then! :)