3 Stars

The Andy Griffith show and Perry Mason appear to have been removed from prime. I tried to watch and neither was viewable.
I’m guessing the streaming contract was up on each.

Published by

F

Featured Thread

author

Tino

Executive Producer
Premium
Joined
Apr 19, 1999
Messages
17,693
Reaction score
9,173
Points
9,110
Age
56
Location
Metro NYC
Real Name
Valentino
The Andy Griffith show and Perry Mason appear to have been removed from prime. I tried to watch and neither was viewable.
I’m guessing the streaming contract was up on each.
Happens all the time.
 

John*Wells

Screenwriter
Joined
Jun 12, 2005
Messages
1,284
Reaction score
954
Points
1,610
Real Name
John
Happens all the time.

Yes it does. Perry Mason is currently on cbs all access. I wonder if TAGS will stream there as well. I am working in Florida right now so I’m streaming a lot instead of watching physical media
 

Matt Hough

Director
Reviewer
Joined
Apr 24, 2006
Messages
21,757
Reaction score
11,310
Points
9,110
Location
Charlotte, NC
Real Name
Matt Hough
I hate that they are gone (very convenient to watch them there even though Perry only had the first five seasons available if I'm remembering correctly). Thankfully I have the discs.
 

Robert Crawford

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Dec 9, 1998
Messages
47,451
Reaction score
23,497
Points
9,110
Location
Michigan
Real Name
Robert

Robert Crawford

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Dec 9, 1998
Messages
47,451
Reaction score
23,497
Points
9,110
Location
Michigan
Real Name
Robert
I hate that they are gone (very convenient to watch them there even though Perry only had the first five seasons available if I'm remembering correctly). Thankfully I have the discs.
Same here!
 

Scott Merryfield

Executive Producer
Joined
Dec 16, 1998
Messages
15,700
Reaction score
3,353
Points
9,110
Location
Michigan
One of the BIG drawbacks of streaming.
It's one of the drawbacks of streaming subscription services. Any titles purchased via streaming sites such as iTunes, Vudu, etc. do not go away. It's really no different than a TV or cable channel no longer telecasting a show.
 

John*Wells

Screenwriter
Joined
Jun 12, 2005
Messages
1,284
Reaction score
954
Points
1,610
Real Name
John
So now I see that The Andy Griffith show is listed on Amazon prime again. However the season 4 episode Andy’s Vacation is not showing prime eligible while all other seasons and all other eepisodes show prime eligible
 
Last edited:

dpippel

HTF Premium Member
Premium
Joined
Feb 24, 2000
Messages
9,036
Reaction score
5,769
Points
9,110
Location
Yoyodyne Propulsion Systems
Real Name
Doug
It's one of the drawbacks of streaming subscription services. Any titles purchased via streaming sites such as iTunes, Vudu, etc. do not go away. It's really no different than a TV or cable channel no longer telecasting a show.
Right. I assumed we were talking about Amazon Prime Video streaming. Obviously, if you've purchased something, it's not going away. As far as we know. ;)

BUT, I disagree that it's just like TV or cable. Streaming services are on-demand, so customers get used to having the ability to watch, say, Star Wars, at will whenever they want to without actually "buying" the movie. It's included in the monthly fee. It's like having it in my iTunes library. If I want to watch it every night for a week then I can, at any time of my choosing. If that favorite film is suddenly removed from the the service, the customer loses that movie. TV/cable/satellite forces you to watch on their schedule when they want to air something unless you have a DVR. If HBO stops showing a movie, you expect that to eventually happen because they've been using that programming model since the dawn of time.
 

Robert Crawford

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Dec 9, 1998
Messages
47,451
Reaction score
23,497
Points
9,110
Location
Michigan
Real Name
Robert

Scott Merryfield

Executive Producer
Joined
Dec 16, 1998
Messages
15,700
Reaction score
3,353
Points
9,110
Location
Michigan
Right. I assumed we were talking about Amazon Prime Video streaming. Obviously, if you've purchased something, it's not going away. As far as we know. ;)

BUT, I disagree that it's just like TV or cable. Streaming services are on-demand, so customers get used to having the ability to watch, say, Star Wars, at will whenever they want to without actually "buying" the movie. It's included in the monthly fee. It's like having it in my iTunes library. If I want to watch it every night for a week then I can, at any time of my choosing. If that favorite film is suddenly removed from the the service, the customer loses that movie. TV/cable/satellite forces you to watch on their schedule when they want to air something unless you have a DVR. If HBO stops showing a movie, you expect that to eventually happen because they've been using that programming model since the dawn of time.
Cable TV companies have On Demand services that offer the same thing to their subscribers as Netflix, Hulu, Prime, etc. Shows and films disappear from there, too - - at least they do with the On Demand offering I get through Comcast.
 
  • Like
Reactions: dpippel

Robert Crawford

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Dec 9, 1998
Messages
47,451
Reaction score
23,497
Points
9,110
Location
Michigan
Real Name
Robert
  • Like
Reactions: dpippel

Robert Crawford

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Dec 9, 1998
Messages
47,451
Reaction score
23,497
Points
9,110
Location
Michigan
Real Name
Robert
I already face the problem of having too much I want to watch and not enough time to watch it. So if something disappears on me before I get the chance, I just move on to something else.
Frankly, that's probably what most people do.
 

Josh Steinberg

Executive Producer
Reviewer
Joined
Jun 10, 2003
Messages
18,397
Reaction score
22,787
Points
9,110
Age
37
Real Name
Josh Steinberg
I just don’t really get where the idea came from that a subscription service is expected to license third party content in perpetuity. That’s not to say it’s not obnoxious when something leaves a service you’re already paying for, but I just don’t see it as a “Sky is falling” type of scenario. (To be fair, I don’t think that this is a thread suggesting so.)

I’m guessing that maybe everyone had different experiences with broadcast and syndication TV but like I said before to me this feels very similar to that. It used to be that Id watch my favorite reruns of a show on Channel 11. Then they’d move to channel 9. A few years later, they’d go to channel 5. Some would go to cable, which we didn’t have when I was a kid.

That feels about the same as now. Sometimes an old show is on Netflix, sometimes it’s on Prime, it may then go to Hulu or a specific network’s app, and then it might come back to where it started.

For the shows/movies I want as close as possible to permanent, no questions or hassles access to, I buy on a digital storefront or on physical media. For everything else that I’m happy to pick up as it becomes available and leave when it’s no longer there, streaming is fine. Which for me mirrors how I used to watch TV, where some shows I’d watch because they were available and some shows I’d go to the hassle of taping off TV or getting Columbia House VHS so it was always up to me.

Its funny how the tech changes but the approach I’ve had doesn’t seem to change much. I feel both modern and dinosaur-like simultaneously. :)