Sayonara Blu-ray Review

Romantic drama remains relevant in today's judgmental environment. 5 Stars

A measuredly-paced look at interracial romantic entanglements amid the bigotry of the post-World War II era in Japan, Joshua Logan’s Sayonara captures both the comic and tragic sides of the story spread among six or seven major characters in a beautifully filmed and thoughtfully mounted production.

Sayonara (1957)
Released: 20 Dec 1957
Rated: UNRATED
Runtime: 147 min
Director: Joshua Logan
Genre: Drama, Romance
Cast: Marlon Brando, Patricia Owens, James Garner, Martha Scott
Writer(s): Paul Osborn (screen play), James A. Michener (based on the novel by)
Plot: A US air force major in Kobe confronts his own opposition to marriages between American servicemen and Japanese women when he falls for a beautiful performer.
IMDB rating: 7.2
MetaScore: N/A

Disc Information
Studio: MGM
Distributed By: Twilight Time
Video Resolution: 1080P/AVC
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
Audio: English 2.0 DTS-HDMA
Subtitles: English SDH
Rating: Not Rated
Run Time: 2 Hr. 27 Min.
Package Includes: Blu-ray
Case Type: clear keep case
Disc Type: BD50 (dual layer)
Region: All
Release Date: 11/14/2017
MSRP: $29.95

The Production: 4/5

A measuredly-paced look at interracial romantic entanglements amid the bigotry of the post-World War II era in Japan, Joshua Logan’s Sayonara captures both the comic and tragic sides of the story spread among six or seven major characters in a beautifully filmed and thoughtfully mounted production. With sensitive performances and breathtaking location photography, Sayonara still makes a most vivid impression even sixty years after the fact.

Stationed in Japan during the Korean War, U.S. Air Force Major Lloyd “Ace” Gruver (Marlon Brando) is engaged to his longtime sweetheart Eileen Webster (Patricia Owens), the daughter of his commanding officer General Webster (Kent Smith), but upon redeployment to Japan falls for the beautiful Japanese actress Hana-ogi (Miiko Taka). However, he is hesitant to pursue the relationship due to the unfortunate example of his crew chief Airman Joe Kelly (Red Buttons). Kelly, against official military advice and the prejudices of his commanding officers, married a Japanese woman, Katsumi (Miyoshi Umeki), and his military career has suffered ever since, and the military seems to be clamping down on interracial marriages even harder as the Korean War intensifies.

Paul Osborn’s screenplay brings forth much of the local color and the mutual prejudices of both Americans and Japanese to interracial relationships found in James Michener’s best seller, and director Joshua Logan takes it the rest of the way using his very wide screen canvas to investigate not only the two on-going love stories which he paces very slowly and deliberately in an Occidental fashion but also to set forth lots of the sights and sounds of Japan, particularly Kabuki and Shochiku theater troupes and traditional Japanese domestic customs. Not only does Logan use the theatrical prosceniums to stretch from one end of the frame to the other, but he’s fond of using other landscapes (bridges, elongated hallways) to traverse the widescreen. He also gives Miiko Taka’s Hana-ogi a breathtaking screen introduction in an expressive montage of the dancing actress in a series of elaborate costumes and stage settings as Marlon Brando’s Major Gruver (along with the viewer) becomes smitten with her varied looks and mannerisms. There are some minor stumbles along the way: Major Gruver comments to the leading male actress Nakamura (Ricardo Montalban) that the Kabuki theater with its all-male cast could have used a “Marilyn Monroe” for variety’s sake though in 1951, Monroe was hardly a household name that an American much less a Japanese would have been familiar with (Ava Gardner or Rita Hayworth would have been better choices). And the two mixed-raced couples attending a puppet show where the play involved a ritual suicide among lovers refusing to be parted from one another is a bit too coincidentally on-the-nose for comfort.

Marlon Brando effects a drawly Southern accent that he does manage to maintain throughout (Douglas Watson as Colonel Crawford also tries one on for size, but his is less well sustained), and he manages to act through his contrived accent (the main character in the novel was not Southern) to reach the truth of the character and the story. Red Buttons, known before this film as a television comic, plays it completely straight as the airman who refuses to knuckle under to the military’s blind prejudice against Orientals earning himself a supporting actor Oscar in the process. Miyoshi Umeki as the delicate, open-hearted Katsumi likewise won an Oscar with much less screen time. Patricia Owens does well as the naïve Eileen Webster whose eyes and heart are opened once she experiences what Japan has to offer with the suggestion that a possible relationship with Ricardo Montalban’s Nakamura may be in the offing. Miiko Taka is striking looking but a bit less dramatically effective as Hana-Ogi who must conquer her own hatred of Americans in order to find room for love in her heart. James Garner earned a Golden Globe as Most Promising Newcomer as Captain Bailey who himself is involved with a Japanese actress. Kent Smith and Martha Scott do fine as the more-set-in-their-ways older generation.

Video: 4/5

3D Rating: NA

The film’s 2.35:1 Technirama aspect ratio is faithfully delivered in a lovely 1080p transfer using the AVC codec. Sharpness is quite nice throughout, and color (processed by Technicolor rather than WarnerColor) is controlled yet vivid with reds especially vibrant and alluring and skin tones very believable and appealing. There are some occasional but noticeable fluctuations in density, and there are just enough specks of dust to register mild irritation in the viewer from time to time. The film has been divided into 24 chapters.

Audio: 5/5

The DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 stereo sound mix nicely represents the movie’s Oscar-winning sound design. Dialogue has been well-recorded and has been placed in the center channel. Franz Waxman’s background score and Irving Berlin’s sweetly evocative title song fill the available channels quite well as do ambient effects like fireworks and swirling river currents. Age-related problems with hiss, flutter, and crackle are non-existent.

Special Features: 2.5/5

Isolated Score and Effects Track: presented in DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mono.

Theatrical Trailer (3:59, HD)

Six-Page Booklet: contains some color and tinted stills, original poster art on the back cover, and film historian Julie Kirgo’s thoughtful analysis of the movie.

Overall: 4/5

Though one might assume that the prejudicial undercurrents in the plot of Sayonara might date it for today’s audiences, sadly they have never been more relevant. The film’s moving depiction of love fighting to survive amid the strife and conflict of outside pressures rings just as true today as it did then. Recommended! There are only 3,000 copies of this Blu-ray available. Those interested in purchasing it should go to either www.twilighttimemovies.com or www.screenarchives.com to see if product is still in stock. Information about the movie can also be found via Facebook at www.facebook.com/twilighttimemovies.

Published by

Matt Hough

author,editor

12 Comments

  1. George R. Groves won his first Academy Award for the sound of “Sayonara”; and I am very glad to read that the Audio has received a 5/5 for this TT edition. Mr. Groves second win was for “My Fair Lady”. All in all, he received 7 nominations within a single decade. On many other fronts, I can’t wait to purchase “Sayonara”; but this will become the first true time that I will experience the sound design from one of our greats. The BD availability of Mr. Groves other nominated works are “The Music Man”, “The Great Race”, “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?”; while leaving us to wait on The Nun’s Story” and “Sunrise at Campabello”. Thanks TT for further closing another gap in movie collecting; which also includes that of another Marlon Brando nomination, as well.

  2. I watched it earlier this year on TCM and was puzzled by some plot developments that didn’t make sense to me, so I went and read the book and it clarified quite a bit for me. The movie sped things up a good deal in a way that left out important details. I like the movie but I would have liked it more if it had been closer to the book, especially the ending. Also, I found Brando’s hillbilly accent thoroughly annoying. His character was a career military man, a West Point graduate, and the son of a top general. He wouldn’t have talked like a good ol’ boy. As for Miiko Taka, this was her first acting job. She’d been discovered at a travel agency in L.A. Given that, I thought she was quite good. I can’t cite a source, but I believe she and Brando were romantically involved during the film, which would have helped her performance. In the novel, however, her character didn’t speak any English, which makes more sense for a character whose father and brother died in the war.

  3. Jimbo64

    Does anyone else think it’s odd that there are stereo tracks for the feature but mono tracks for the isolated score?

    Yes it is odd but probably just means that they have lost a lot of the elements. This is already indicated by the fact that we are not getting the original 4-track magnetic or something derived from that, but instead are getting what seems like a Dolby Surround 2.0 version for the main soundtrack.

    It is also not clear to me that an 8-perf Technirama element was used for this Blu-ray. It certainly is not Spartacus quality for example.

    Sayonara was originally a Warners release but the control has bounced around quite a bit over the years. We are probably lucky to have what we have.

    On this reviewing, I was very impressed by the subtlety and thoughtfulness of the characterizations and dialogue as well as the beauty of the cinematography.

  4. Jimbo64

    Does anyone else think it’s odd that there are stereo tracks for the feature but mono tracks for the isolated score?

    Not odd at all. Jack L. Warner was famous or should I say infamous for recording over the stereo recordings of the WB scores. That's why there are no stereo release of The Silver Chalace, the complete The Nun's Story and Land of the Pharoahs among others.

  5. rsmithjr

    Yes it is odd but probably just means that they have lost a lot of the elements. This is already indicated by the fact that we are not getting the original 4-track magnetic or something derived from that, but instead are getting what seems like a Dolby Surround 2.0 version for the main soundtrack.

    It is also not clear to me that an 8-perf Technirama element was used for this Blu-ray. It certainly is not Spartacus quality for example.

    Sayonara was originally a Warners release but the control has bounced around quite a bit over the years. We are probably lucky to have what we have.

    On this reviewing, I was very impressed by the subtlety and thoughtfulness of the characterizations and dialogue as well as the beauty of the cinematography. This is a great film that has been somewhat forgotten I am afraid. 1957 was a great year, with The Bridge on the River Kwai and Peyton Place also coming then.

    The stereo music tracks for the film are held by WB. They refused access to them for our release.

  6. Twilight Time

    The stereo music tracks for the film are held by WB. They refused access to them for our release.

    If the stereo tracks do exist it is strange that they didn't allow access. Wonder if this has anything to do with the song? I would also like to believe that Intrada or LLL Records will one day release the complete score …or at least the original lp program.

  7. Paul Rossen

    If the stereo tracks do exist it is strange that they didn't allow access. Wonder if this has anything to do with the song? I would also like to believe that Intrada or LLL Records will one day release the complete score …or at least the original lp program.

    Absolutely nothing strange about non-co-operation from WB. It is their raison detre – soundtrack labels are of course interested in the music too, and we planned a joint isolated score and release on LLL similar to Doctor Dolittle, but WB's hostility and greed put a stop to it. LLL may revisit the music in future, but it's a very long shot.

  8. Twilight Time

    Absolutely nothing strange about non-co-operation from WB. It is their raison detre – soundtrack labels are of course interested in the music too, and we planned a joint isolated score and release on LLL similar to Doctor Dolittle, but WB's hostility and greed put a stop to it. LLL may revisit the music in future, but it's a very long shot.

    Too bad. It's such a lovely score. Hope that LLL gets a chance to revisit.

  9. Twilight Time

    Absolutely nothing strange about non-co-operation from WB. It is their raison detre – soundtrack labels are of course interested in the music too, and we planned a joint isolated score and release on LLL similar to Doctor Dolittle, but WB's hostility and greed put a stop to it. LLL may revisit the music in future, but it's a very long shot.

    greed sums it up totally and the fact WB could not care in helping a small label trying to promote archive films..if they had wanted they could have helped ….its the way of the world today I guess..

  10. Twilight Time

    The stereo music tracks for the film are held by WB. They refused access to them for our release.

    Thank you for the reply, I’m glad they still exist but a shame they wouldn’t make them available.

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