Optoma has today unveiled three projectors designed for gamers heading up with the $1,599 UHD50X, the “world’s first” 240Hz, 4K UHD home theater projector. Designed for both home cinema and gaming enthusiasts, the Optoma UHD50X promises to deliver “incredible details, vibrant colors and blur-free visuals.”

The new unit includes 3,400 lumens of brightness, claimed 500,000:1 contrast ratio, HDR10 and HLG (Hybrid-Log Gamma) compatibility and 4K UHD resolution, making it suitable for environments with high ambient light. An Enhanced Gaming Mode and low input lag of 16ms in 1080p at 240Hz on PCs and 25ms at 4K 60Hz on PCs and consoles, should allow for smooth gaming experiences. The UHD50X also features an HDMI 2.0 input with HDCP 2.2 support for connectivity to 4K UHD devices, and a 12V trigger enables control of motorized screens. The UHD50X is equipped with 10% vertical lens shift and a 1.3x zoom for ease of placement. Lamp life is rated at up to 15,000 hours in Dynamic Black Mode, and can produce an image size of up to 302 inches.

“As the No. 1 Top-Selling Home Theater Projector Brand in retail, the No. 1 DLP Projector Brand in North America and the No. 1 4K UHD projection brand worldwide, Optoma’s market leadership is a testament to its commitment to meeting the needs of consumers, and consistently surpassing their expectations by providing immersive experiences,” shared Maria Repole, head of marketing, Optoma Technology, Inc. “Our new home theater and gaming product portfolio delivers on our promise to produce high-quality projectors with impressive performance, functionality and stunning visuals, offering users larger-than-life cinematic and gaming experiences.”

Optoma is also adding the $1,299 3,400 lumen 4K UHD UHD30 to the line, also supporting 240Hz refresh rate and 16ms response time. It offers HDR10 and HLG compatibility, plus HDMI 2.0 input with HDCP 2.2 connectivity, and a 15,000 hour lamp life in Dynamic mode. The third of the three new PJs is the budget $549 HD146X featuring 3,600 lumens of brightness and a 25,000:1 rated contrast ratio. Response times measure 16ms at 60Hz with gaming consoles and high performance gaming PCs, and a Game Display Mode will enhance “detailed shadows and dark scenes” for improved playability.

For more information and purchasing options, visit Optoma.

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DaveF

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What’s practical about this is 240Hz is an integer multiple of 60Hz, 30Hz, and 24Hz. So it’s a preferred option choice for people who want a locked display frame rate with source interpolation. (Yes, it’s not really an integer multiple of 23.976 but it’s close.)

And given the half hour* it takes the JVC projectors to sync after frame rate change, having a higher max rate could be useful in other projectors.

* Hyperbolic in literal time, but not in experiential time.
 

MCallison

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What’s practical about this is 240Hz is an integer multiple of 60Hz, 30Hz, and 24Hz. So it’s a preferred option choice for people who want a locked display frame rate with source interpolation. (Yes, it’s not really an integer multiple of 23.976 but it’s close.)

And given the half hour* it takes the JVC projectors to sync after frame rate change, having a higher max rate could be useful in other projectors.

* Hyperbolic in literal time, but not in experiential time.

I need an experts opinion - I'm torn on what screen color to buy that would be the best match for this projector. I would be using it for both outdoor movies and indoor gaming/sports/movies. My concerns are mostly on the outdoor setup. I'm trying to decide between CineWhite 1.1 Gain and CineGrey .8Gain. I had seen that with the lower contrast ratio projectors (think HD1080HDR)...the CineWhite doesn't do the saturation and contrast justice in an outdoor evening setting. Seems to be a bit washed out. When seeing it on the CineGrey...it was much better, but brightness was a little less. So, with the much higher contrast ratio of this projector...not sure if spending the extra money for the CineGrey is really necessary. Any feedback would be awesome!
 

DaveF

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Seems if this is for outdoors, you might be using it in daylight or dusk and seated relatively far away, so higher gain would be better. I take that as a "party" situation and not "critical viewing". Darker screen doesn't seem prudent for outdoors?
 

MCallison

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I need an experts opinion - I'm torn on what screen color to buy that would be the best match for this projector. I would be using it for both outdoor movies and indoor gaming/sports/movies. My concerns are mostly on the outdoor setup. I'm trying to decide between CineWhite 1.1 Gain and CineGrey .8Gain. I had seen that with the lower contrast ratio projectors (think HD1080HDR)...the CineWhite doesn't do the saturation and contrast justice in an outdoor evening setting. Seems to be a bit washed out. When seeing it on the CineGrey...it was much better, but brightness was a little less. So, with the much higher contrast ratio of this projector...not sure if spending the extra money for the CineGrey is really necessary. Any feedback would be awesome!
Seems if this is for outdoors, you might be using it in daylight or dusk and seated relatively far away, so higher gain would be better. I take that as a "party" situation and not "critical viewing". Darker screen doesn't seem prudent for outdoors?
Not thinking so much about daylight viewing. Dusk and night will be my preference. Yes, small group viewing...

A bit more critical inside and was hoping to use the same screen. Of not, thats okay, too. Just want to nail it with proper screen selections.
 

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I'm not an expert on screens, especially for outdoors :) But generally I think of dark screens as for light-controlled (dark) rooms to try and increase the perception of dark scenes and contrast. Outdoors, you don't generally have good light control and if you're viewing in the summer, where it's dusk until 9p or later, a brighter screen seems to make sense?

Either way, I'd think you'd want two screens: A fixed, high quality screen indoors and a portable, storable screen that you're ok exposing to the elements outside.
 

MCallison

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That makes total sense. Thanks so much for your feedback and expertise - really appreciate it!