Disclosure: This page contains affiliate links. If you purchase a product from one of our links, we could receive a commission from the seller. Rest assured, we only recommend products we believe in, and all opinions are 100% truthful. Learn More »

NAD Electronics has introduced the M23 Hybrid Digital stereo power amplifier (US$3499 / CDN$4599 MSRP), available now. The new amp builds on the Purifi Eigentakt amp technology first introduced on the M33 BluOS Streaming Amplifier, and which promises to “nearly eliminate” harmonic and intermodulation distortion and noise with an “even, wide, and load invariant frequency response.”

According to Cas Oostvogel, NAD’s Product Manager, “The sonic character of the M23 is reinforced in the story told by the numbers. This is an amazingly powerful and transparent amplifier bringing new levels of refinement and dynamics at any level and sets a new benchmark for performance and value in its category.”

The M23 offers a minimum of 200W per channel and can achieve more than 260W dynamic power per channel into 8 ohms, and more than 520W into 4 ohms. The company says the unit is also perfect addition to expand the power of the M33 to create a 2 x 700W system or for supercharging an existing separates collection.

Minus “power-hungry” Class A/B output stages, the stereo M23 amp’s Class D output stage is linear over a wide bandwidth, which NAD says produces detail, control and transparency. As well as RCA and XLR balanced inputs, a bridge mode, and three selectable gain levels, there is a 12v trigger and auto sensing. The M23 includes an all alloy casework for both elegance and practicality. Rigid panels are supported by magnetic iso-point feet allowing a solid foundation for circuit boards and intricate internal construction. The M23 employs a modern and fresh take on traditional stereo amplifiers with features and performance offering value for money. For more information, visit NAD.

 

 

 

Post Disclaimer

Some of our content may contain marketing links, which means we will receive a commission for purchases made via those links. In our editorial content, these affiliate links appear automatically, and our editorial teams are not influenced by our affiliate partnerships. We work with several providers (currently Skimlinks and Amazon) to manage our affiliate relationships. You can find out more about their services by visiting their sites.

Published by

Martin Dew

editor