Movies You’ve Watched More Than 10 Times

What movie(s) have you watched at least 10 times? 4 Stars

Everybody has favorites. Those goto movies that we can watch again and again. What movie(s) have you watched at least 10 times?Special award if it’s over 25 times.

I’ll tip mine later.

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Kevin Collins

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123 Comments

  1. I don't believe there are any feature films I've watched over ten times. A few might qualify for 7 or 8 viewings, though. I think "Creature From the Black Lagoon" ranks in the top spot for repeated viewings. Now there are things like "Our Gang" and "Three Stooges" shorts that I'm sure I've seen well over ten times, as they were such omnipresent fixtures on tv when I was growing up.

    I've kept a log of all the movies I've watched since 1979. I never listed repeat viewings. As of this week, I've now seen 5,064 different feature films. Almost all are oldies, of pre-1970s/80s vintage. I've also kept track by using those studio-themed books, like "The RKO Story," "The Universal Story," etc., via putting a little red dot alongside the film entries that I've seen.

  2. Yeah, ten times is a lot, I'm always frightened of ruining a favourite film by over-viewing it. One film that comes to mind is Jason & The Argonauts, I think I saw it three or four times on general release (god, I loved that movie) & then for a few years afterwards I'd go see it whenever it turned up in the odd cinema, & then a few times on the telly. The funny thing is, I've had the excellent Blu-ray for some years now…& have never got around to watching it (yet).

  3. Don't know if 10 times but my list probably tracks with many others': Dracula; Citizen Kane; echoing Bert (especially now that I have a 3D TV) Creature from the Black Lagoon (also Gog for the same reason…); Psycho; Seven Days in May; Goldfinger; French Connection; Godfather; Animal House, etc. One title on my list that probably separates me from the rest of the pack is Kiss Me Deadly.

  4. Off the top of my head, at least twenty times for:

    The Wizard of Oz
    Goldfinger
    and Dr. No, my two favorite Bond adventures
    The Thin Man
    Murder, She Said
    and Murder Most Foul, the two best Margaret Rutherford/Miss Marple films
    To Kill a Mockingbird

    These movies are like my comfort food. I can put them on when I'm feeling down in the dumps and get instantly lifted up and carried away with their entertaining qualities.

  5. All of the Godzilla movies except for Godzilla 1998,2014, Shin Godzilla, and Godzilla vs Megaguirus , King Kong 1933,1976, Wizard of Oz, Superman the Movie, It Conquered the World, The Crawling Eye, Fiend without a Face, Star Wars, The Birds, Psycho, The Universal Classic horrors (Frankenstein & the sequels, Creature from the Black Lagoon, Wolf Man, Dracula) Curse of Frankenstein, Tremors, The Fly original and remake, The Thing 1982, The Blob original and remake, all the Ray Harryhausen movies except for The Three Worlds of Gulliver, The Angry Red Planet, Konga, Reptilicus, Yongary, Gappa, Vertigo,Night of the Living Dead 1968,Close Encounters of the Third Kind, ET, Curse of the Werewolf, The Gorgon, Dawn of the Dead, Deep Red, Bird with the Crystal Plumage, Cat O Nine Tails, Gorgo, Rodan, The Mysterians, Dogora the Space Monster, The Time Machine, War of the Worlds, The Giant Behemoth, Tarantula, Deadly Mantis, Land Unknown, Land the Time Forgot, Halloween, Its a Wonderful Life ,The Maltese Falcon, The Kennel Murder Case, The Big Sleep,Robocop, The Terminator,
    Only a few ! 😀

  6. Off the top my head my goto movies are (in no particular order):

    Any Leone from Dollars trilogy onwards
    The Third Man
    El Cid
    Blade Runner
    A Christmas Carol (Alistair Sim version)
    Ben Hur (Heston)
    The Wind And The Lion
    It's A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World
    Game Of Death (Bruce Lee)
    Persona
    Zulu
    The Thing
    The Legend Of Hell House

    Too many I'm forgetting for sure!

    Regards,

  7. North by Northwest (my favourite film)
    Sherlock Holmes series (Rathbone)
    Miss Marple (Joan Hickson)
    4:50 from Paddington (Geraldine McEwan)
    Three Little Words
    The Snowman (animation)
    Crook's Tour
    The Big Heat
    Slightly Scarlet
    White Christmas
    Christmas Vacation
    Vertigo
    Back to the Future

    etc

  8. I've seen so many films ten times or more that I'm not sure which ones I've seen only eight or nine times! Absolute cold stone certainties for more than ten times are Rio Bravo, North By Northwest, Out Of The Past, The Third Man, The Big Sleep, Shane, Pal Joey, The Bridge On The River Kwai, To Have And Have Not, Comanche Territory, Casablanca, Vertigo, Double Indemnity, The Band Wagon, The Maltese Falcon, You Were Never Lovelier, Ocean's Eleven, Notorious, Ride Lonesome, The Apartment, My Darling Clementine and You'll Never Get Rich.

  9. Bert Greene

    I don't believe there are any feature films I've watched over ten times. A few might qualify for 7 or 8 viewings, though. I think "Creature From the Black Lagoon" ranks in the top spot for repeated viewings. Now there are things like "Our Gang" and "Three Stooges" shorts that I'm sure I've seen well over ten times, as they were such omnipresent fixtures on tv when I was growing up.

    I've kept a log of all the movies I've watched since 1979. I never listed repeat viewings. As of this week, I've now seen 5,064 different feature films. Almost all are oldies, of pre-1970s/80s vintage. I've also kept track by using those studio-themed books, like "The RKO Story," "The Universal Story," etc., via putting a little red dot alongside the film entries that I've seen.

    Wow – 5,064 feature films. Now you have me wondering how many I've watched.:roll:

  10. Too many. 🙂

    Thanks to a childhood of watching and rewatching movies & then working in a video store for years in college, I've seen a ton of the movies more than 10 times- all the Star Wars movies (even the new one), a bunch of the Halloweens, Friday The 13ths & A Nightmare On Elm Streets, the first two Terminators, the Jaws movies (even the awful ones), the Indiana Jones movies, Aliens, Clerks, Mallrats, Chasing Amy and probably many more.

    I've probably seen most of them more than 25 times. Like I said, too many. 🙂

  11. As with many others hundreds of titles over 10, in fact dozens over 25.

    Heck, I’ll bet I saw The Wizard Of Oz over 25 times before the video age began due to its annual broadcast.

    Another title surprisingly not mentioned yet – It’s A Wonderful Life.

    Most of the holiday staples are over 25
    Miracle On 34th St
    Holiday Inn
    A Christmas Carol (‘38)
    Easter Parade
    Yankee Doodle Dandy
    Quiet Man
    Abbott And Costello Meet Frankenstein

    Many Flynn’s, Astaires, and Bogarts are near or over 25

    <edited> – ok, my math is off with Wizard Of Oz. Video Age went mass in mid-80s, and I wouldn't have begun annual viewing until mid-60s (I'm 56), so probably closer to 20 times before VA. But more than 25 since mid-80s.
    <edited>

  12. 25 +
    The Rocky Horror Picture Show
    White Christmas
    A Christmas Carol (Alastair Sim)

    10+
    The Band Wagon
    All About Eve
    King Kong (1933)
    Way Out West
    The Ritz
    Funny Girl
    Who's Minding The Mint ?
    Casablanca
    The Wizard of Oz
    Airplane !
    Singin' In The Rain
    What's Up, Doc ?
    Mildred Pierce
    Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein

  13. Any parent of young children growing up in the VHS/DVD era would have to have a long number of those. Maybe "Paid attention while watching" might be a different story.

    Easily
    Mary Poppins
    Little Mermaid
    Lion King
    Aladdin
    Pinocchio
    Dumbo
    Jungle Book
    Peter Pan
    Maybe Beauty and the Beast
    Toy Story
    Cars
    1st 2 Little Foot Movies
    Wizard of Oz
    Willy Wonka
    Matilda
    I'm sure there are others
    Even more if you include segments of movies — esp Sorc. Apprentice from Fantasia

    Being a teen from the 70's and the HBO/Showtime in College generation
    Various original Star Wars (4 and 5 mostly my oldest saw the 1990's Theatrical Re-release on the big screen over a 6 week period I thought he was going to wear out my Laserdiscs)
    Raiders
    ET
    Back to the Future
    I'm sure at least a couple James Bond's from the late 70's

    Shawshank Redemption

    Unforgiven
    Josey Wales
    For a Few Dollars More
    at least a couple more Eastwood westerns

    African Queen
    maybe Casablanca
    Sound of Music
    Original Planet of the Apes

    When Harry Met Sally
    Sleepless in Seattle
    Big
    A League of Their Own
    Bull Durham
    Maybe Major League (another pattern I notice)
    Apollo 13

    These could be over 25 by now esp if you count "at least an hour worth"
    Christmas Story — 4-5+ times in a day with those TBS loops
    Groundhog Day — I remember doing a 24 hr loop one of the first time they did it when I was home alone though I didn't sit in front the TV the entire 24 hrs, but it was on and I was nearby the whole time.
    It's a Wonderful Life
    Miracle on 34th St
    A Christmas Carol (at least a couple versions or 3 if you count Muppets and other animated versions)

    This is getting a bit depressing

  14. Many movies with over 10 viewings but my list includes:
    The Great Escape
    Lawrence of Arabia
    The Bridge on the River Kwai
    The Fall of the Roman Empire
    The Wizard of Oz
    The Searchers
    How Green was my Valley
    The Professionals
    Casablanca
    The Maltese Falcon
    The Sound of Music
    Many others that give me immense pleasure on each viewing despite how many time I have viewed them.

  15. BobO’Link

    There are many that fit the "more than 10 times" qualification. Off the top of my head:

    Miracle on 34th St. (20+)
    Holiday Inn (20+)
    Christmas in Connecticut (20+)
    Home Alone
    Mixed Nuts
    It's a Wonderful Life
    (20+)
    A Christmas Story (20+)
    The Thin Man series
    The Charlie Chan series
    The Lord of the Ring trilogy
    The Bob Hope/Bing Crosby Road films
    The Fly
    (1958)
    The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)
    Captain Blood
    The Adventures of Robin Hood
    King Kong
    (1933) (20+)
    Frankenstein (1931) (20+)
    Dracula (1931) (20+)
    Bride of Frankentein
    The Wolf Man
    (1941) (20+)
    The Invisible Man (1933)
    The Mummy (1932) (20+)
    The Mummy (1959)
    The Creature from the Black Lagoon
    2001: A Space Oddysey
    Planet of the Apes
    (1968)
    The Ten Commandments (1956)
    The Three Musketeers (1948)
    Star Trek: The Motion Picture
    Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
    Our Man Flint
    In Like Flint
    The Blues Brothers
    Animal House
    All the Ray Harryhausen films
    All the Marx Brothers Films
    (20+)
    The Black Swan
    Blazing Saddles
    Young Frankenstein
    The Producers
    (1967 original of course)
    War of the Worlds (1953)
    The Thing from Another World (1951)
    Star Wars (aka Episode IV)
    My Darling Clementine
    The Maltese Falcon
    Bringing up Baby
    His Girl Friday
    It Happened One Night
    Harvey
    Gone with the Wind
    The Mark of Zorro
    Some Like it Hot
    The Seven Year Itch
    The Pink Panther
    A Shot in the Dark
    Return of the Pink Panther
    Godzilla
    (original) (20+)
    Mothra
    My Fair Lady
    All Three Stooges shorts and films
    (20+)
    All Little Rascals/Our Gang shorts (20+)
    All Laurel & Hardy shorts and films (20+)
    All Abbott & Costello films
    The Nutty Professor
    (Jerry Lewis)
    All Martin & Lewis films
    All Andy Hardy films
    All the Weissmuller Tarzan films
    (20+)
    All Shirley Temple films (20+)
    The Princess Bride
    Alien
    The Sound of Music
    To Be or Not to Be
    (1942)
    The Time Machine (1960)
    Journey to the Center of the Earth (1959)
    and many more…

    What a terrific list!

  16. Since 1978 I've had a simple system of recording on a Post-it note the date I watch each of my movies, so I can give you an exact list.

    Most Watched Movies Since 1978

    1. The Best Years of Our Lives (91 viewings)
    2. Star Wars (84)
    3. E.T. (47)
    4. The Empire Strikes Back (45)
    5. Raiders of the Lost Ark (36)
    6. The Wrath of Khan (34)
    7. Jaws (28)
    8. Planet of the Apes (26)
    9. It’s A Wonderful Life (24)
    10. Lawrence of Arabia (22)
    11. Gettysburg (21)
    12. Back to the Future (20)
    13. The Godfather (19)
    14. Capricorn One (18)
    15. Superman (1978) (16)
    16. Seven Days In May (15)
    17. The Fellowship of the Ring (14)
    18. Dances with Wolves (13)
    19. Close Encounters of the Third Kind (12)
    20. Silent Running (11)
    21. The Terminator (10)

    The rest have been 9 viewings or less.

  17. The Wizard of Oz, because they used to show it on TV once a year when I was a kid
    Walt Disney's Alice in Wonderland
    Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho
    The Legend of Lizzie Borden (Actually, any Elizabeth Montgomery made-for-TV movie. I was obsessed with her when I was a teen, and I recorded most of her TV movies which I've probably watched at least 10 times over the past 30 years)
    New favorites I discovered late in life approaching the tenth mark: Dario Argento's: Suspiria, Tenebrae, Deep Red

  18. Without getting into cartoons, Laurel and Hardy & 3 Stooges, my favorite films I've watched more than 10 times…

    IT'S A MAD, MAD, MAD, WORLD
    EL DORADO
    THE BLUES BROTHERS
    BLAZING SADDLES
    YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN
    AIRPLANE
    TOP SECRET
    THE GENERAL
    DIRTY HARRY
    ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD
    THE GOOD HUMOR MAN (1950, Columbia) with Jack Carson. Screenplay by Frank Tashlin. Lots of great cartoon-like gags.
    SON OF PALEFACE with Bob Hope. Co-written and directed by Tashlin.
    TRAIL OF ROBIN HOOD with Roy Rogers. Big fan of B-westerns and director William Witney.
    SPY SMASHER (Republic serial directed by Witney.

  19. Certainly these 20, the most watched first:

    Ben-Hur, The Uninvited, How The West Was Won, Seventh Heaven, Loves of Pharaoh, With Fire and Sword, The Ten Commandments, Remember the Night, Metropolis, Quo Vadis, The Egyptian, Exodus, Spartacus, I Know Where I'm Going, King of Kings (1927), The Sign of the Cross, The Young Girls of Rochefort, Boy on a Dolphin, Johnny Guitar, The Big Trail

    Comfort food all.

  20. Good grief! Where do I start? The advantage of having a massive film library is revisiting an old favorite at a moment's notice and there are so many films that give me pleasure that are frequently played every couple of years or so. Way too many to list but among the most viewed:

    White Christmas (the only Xmas movie I watch religiously each Xmas)
    Wait Until Dark (I saw it 8 times in a theater when it was first released and many times on laser, DVD and now blu)
    Pillow Talk (my go to comfort food movie)
    All About Eve
    Singin' In The Rain
    Samson And Delilah
    Pink Panther
    The Birds
    North By Northwest
    Where The Boys Are
    (Connie Francis was my first "crush")
    Written On The Wind (Sirk's films are high on my rewatch list)
    Johnny Guitar
    High Noon
    The High And The Mighty
    Clue
    Poseidon Adventure

    I'll stop there but I could go on 🙂

  21. My record is Dr. Zhivago at 175 times but this may cheating since I was a union projectionist in college. I tend to only count theatrical showings but dozens of films more than 10 times. Probably 50 for Vertigo, 4 on the first day when I was 13 and my parents dragged me out of the theatre. If I like a film I take friends and family making for multiple viewings. Many of the films mentioned here are also on my multiple viewings list.

  22. Great topic!
    In no particular order…

    1. Arthur (Dudley Moore and John Gielgud – Perfect chemistry) RIP to both.
    2. Groundhog Day (RIP Harold Ramis)
    3. The Sound of Music (Yes. I confess, I love a good musical)
    4. Scarface (No explanation needed)
    5. Wall Street (The first one – There should never have been a second one)
    6. Superman 1 – 3 ( Gene Hackman is THE man, and so was Christopher Reeve – RIP to him and Dana)
    7. Stripes ( See my signature)
    8. The "Man with no name" trilogy (Clint Eastwood at his absolute best as an actor anyway.)
    9. Heartbreak Ridge (See above)
    10. Fast Times at Ridgemont High (Sean Penn when he wasn't so serious)
    11. Clueless (What can I say? I love this film.)
    12. Johnny Dangerously (This and the two above it are [IMO] Amy Heckerlings crowning achievements)
    13. The first two Bourne films (Chris Cooper is simply amazing in these and steals the show.)
    14. Oblivion (Great Blu Ray with excellent video and sound quality. Story is pretty good too)
    15. Place Holder for Black Panther ( I wasn't impressed with the Real3D version I saw in the commercial theater. Can't wait to get this one in the Home Theater)
  23. Far too many to list. My list includes (seen in cinemas only): SEVENTH SEAL; BURMESE HARP;LAWRENCE OF ARABIA;WEST SIDE STORY ;1900;MURDER MOST FOUL;MURDER SHE SAID;LADY WITH THE LITTLE DOG;;HOW THE WEST WAS WON;WONDERFUL WORLD OF THE BROTHERS GRIMM;MARY POPPINS;LES DIABOLIQUES;LAST PICTURE SHOW;THE SUBJECT WAS ROSES;GONE WITH THE WIND;SWEET CHARITY;LES ENFANTS DU PARADIS;SPARTACUS;2001 A SPACE ODYSSEY;SAND PEBBLES;CAN-CAN;CLEOPATRA;SEVEN BRIDES FOR EVEN BROTHERS;PSYCHO;A SUMMER PLACE;PEYTON PLACE;LA STRADA .COME AND SEE;THE ROBE;WIZARD OF OZ;FORBIDDEN PLANET; Also working in a TODD-AO cinema I managed to see SOUND OF MUSIC at least a hundred tImes.Same for SOUTH PACIFIC.(100 times at least) OKLAHOMA;KING AND I;CAROUSEL and possibly 100's of other films more than ten times.

  24. Bedknobs and Broomsticks
    My Fair Lady
    The Wizard of Oz (1939)
    Gone With the Wind
    Oklahoma!
    South Pacific (1958)
    The King and I (1956)
    Grease (1978)
    Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory
    Pete's Dragon (1977)
    Annie (1982)
    The Muppet Movie
    Forrest Gump
    E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
    Who Framed Roger Rabbit
    Pinocchio
    Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
    Dumbo
    The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
    Pee-Wee's Big Adventure
    Cinderella
    The Great Muppet Caper
    Return To Oz
    Oliver!
    Bye Bye Birdie (1963)
    Auntie Mame
    The Music Man
    Gypsy (1962 and 1993)
    Alice In Wonderland (1951)
    West Side Story
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Network
    Blazing Saddles
    Pink Flamingos
    Hairspray (1988)
    Airplane!
    Serial Mom
    Female Trouble
    All That Jazz
    The Producers (1968)
    Smile
    Robin Hood (1973)
    What's Up, Doc?
    The Naked Gun
    Honey I Shrunk The Kids
    Drop Dead Gorgeous
    Ed Wood
    Soapdish
    Desperate Living
    Young Frankenstein
    The Little Mermaid
    Beauty and the Beast (1991)
    The Jungle Book (1967)
    Pollyanna (1960)
    The Sword in the Stone (1963)
    The Brave Little Toaster
    Silent Movie
    High Anxiety
    Spaceballs

  25. I keep a word file called "Films Seen Multiple Times" and the first list in it is this one. Some of these films I've actually seen over 20 times.

    Films I’ve seen ten or more times:

    KING KONG (1933)

    THE WIZARD OF OZ (1939)

    CITIZEN KANE (1941)

    CASABLANCA (1943)

    IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE (1946)

    WHITE HEAT (1949)

    MIGHTY JOE YOUNG (1949)

    THEM! (1954)

    REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE (1955)

    INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS (1956)

    THE SEARCHERS (1956)

    GODZILLA, KING OF THE MONSTERS (1956)

    THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1960)

    MYSTERIOUS ISLAND (1961)

    WEST SIDE STORY (1961)

    THE LONGEST DAY (1962)

    BEACH PARTY (1963)

    DR. NO (1963)

    FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE (1963)

    JASON AND THE ARGONAUTS (1963)

    IT’S A MAD, MAD, MAD, MAD WORLD (1963)

    GOLDFINGER (1964)

    THUNDERBALL (1965)

    FAHRENHEIT 451 (1966)

    YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE (1967)

    THE DIRTY DOZEN (1967)

    A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS (1967)

    FOR A FEW DOLLARS MORE (1967)

    THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY (1967)

    PLANET OF THE APES (1968)

    ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST (1969)

    THE WILD BUNCH (1969)

    M*A*S*H (1970)

    DIRTY HARRY (1971)

    TAXI DRIVER (1976)

    LAPUTA: CASTLE IN THE SKY (1986)

    MY NEIGHBOR TOTORO (1988)

    KIKI’S DELIVERY SERVICE (1989)

    KILL BILL, VOL. 1 (2003)

  26. There are so many movies I have watched at least 10 times I decided to focus the hard list on just the movies I actually BOUGHT TICKETS FOR and saw in a commercial theater at least 10 times. I would have seen the ones initially released before the late 1950s or so in revival theaters or on the occasion of a rare major theatrical re-release, something not done much anymore:

    City Lights
    Gone With The Wind
    The Wizard of Oz
    It's a Wonderful Life
    Singin' in the Rain
    7 Brides for 7 Brothers
    On The Waterfront
    Rear Window
    Vertigo
    Psycho
    North By Northwest
    The Birds
    Bridge on the River Kwai
    Gigi
    Geisha Boy
    Rock-a-bye Baby
    The Bellboy
    Don't Give Up the Ship
    House on Haunted Hill
    Gunfight at the O.K. Corral
    Ben-Hur
    Spartacus
    Lawrence of Arabia
    West Side Story
    The Music Man
    It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World
    Goldfinger
    My Fair Lady
    The Sound of Music
    Bonnie and Clyde
    The Graduate
    Funny Girl
    The Lion in Winter
    Midnight Cowboy
    Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
    2001: A Space Odyssey
    The Exorcist
    The Godfather
    Jaws
    Forrest Gump
    Pinocchio
    Lady and the Tramp
    Cinderella
    Dumbo
    Bambi
    Peter Pan

    On television and post home video access, I would add almost any Abbott & Costello movie, Martin and Lewis/Jerry Lewis movie, Hitchcock movie, Universal monster movies, Hammer Films horror movies. Off the top of my head, there would also be Citizen Kane, Some Came Running, It Happened One Night, All About Eve, Rio Bravo, The Searchers, The Apartment, Casablanca, Two For The Road, Lolita, Paths of Glory, How the West Was Won. No way to accurately count, but I would have re-watched those the most, therefore at least 10 times each.

  27. My odd mix, in the order they’ve popped into my head (estimate over ten viewing each, as I’ve kept no logs):

    A Man for All Seasons

    It’s a Wonderful Life

    The Maltese Falcon

    The Big Country

    Rear Window

    The Thirty Nine Steps

    North by Northwest

    Rebecca

    Contact

    White Christmas

    My Cousin Vinny

    Raiders of the Lost Ark

    Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade

    The Third Man

    The Untouchables

    Pollyanna

    The Wrath of Khan

    First Contact

    The Castle

    The Dish

    Gandhi

    Arthur

    Life of Brian

    Goldfinger

    The Sound of Music

    Singing in the Rain

    High Noon

    The Quiet Man

    The Verdict

    The Adventures of Robin Hood

    Genevieve

    Father Goose

    Charade

    To Kill a Mockingbird

    Back to the Future

    Back to the Future III

    The Ladykillers

    Terminator

    The Thief of Bagdad

    A Hard Day’s Night

    Most Disneys

    Great to see The Maltese Falcon showing up on so many people’s lists.

  28. Too many to list, but I guess that isn't going to stop me. Ones that come to mind, and from culling other's lists… (in roughly chronological order)

    King Kong
    The Wizard of Oz
    Casablanca
    Its a Wonderful Life
    Harvey
    An American In Paris
    The Bridge on the River Kwai
    The Searchers
    Mister Roberts
    The Ten Commandments
    The Big Country
    Ben-Hur
    Some Like It Hot
    Lawrence of Arabia
    Dr. Strangelove
    Patton
    Planet of the Apes
    Bullitt
    Once Upon A Time In The West
    Jeremiah Johnson
    Cool Hand Luke
    2001: A Space Odyssey
    Dirty Harry
    The Seven-Ups
    The Godfather
    A Clockwork Orange
    The Godfather Part II
    Taxi Driver
    Jaws
    Rocky
    Superman
    Animal House
    Apocalypse Now
    Blood Simple
    Caddyshack
    Blade Runner
    Stripes
    Raging Bull
    Chariots of Fire
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    An Officer and a Gentleman
    Star Trek II – The Wrath of Khan
    War Games
    Tender Mercies
    The Natural
    Raising Arizona
    The Pope of Greenwich Village
    Dune
    Terminator
    Top Gun
    Blue Velvet
    Ferris Bueller's Day Off
    The Shining
    Platoon
    Full Metal Jacket
    Robocop
    Angel Heart
    Predator
    Die Hard
    Total Recall
    The Hunt for Red October
    Goodfellas
    Field of Dreams
    The Silence of the Lambs
    Last of the Mohicans
    A River Runs Through It
    Unforgiven
    Terminator II
    The Fugitive
    Pulp Fiction
    The Shawshank Redemption
    Seven
    Heat
    The English Patient
    Saving Private Ryan
    The Big Lebowski
    The Matrix Trilogy
    O Brother, Where Art Thou?
    Kill Bill Vol 1 & Vol 2

    Just about all of the Bond films (well at least 90% of them)
    Just about all of the Clint Eastwood westerns.
    The original Star Wars Trilogy (well over ten times theatrically, not taking into account even more home viewings)
    The first three films in the Alien series.
    The first three films in the Lethal Weapon series.

    (There were a lot of years where I didn't have cable, so many of my VHS and Laserdisc titles went into heavy rotation to fill the time when nothing on broadcast television held my interest.)

    I'm sure there is more, but that'll do.

    – Walter.

  29. MatthewA

    Bedknobs and Broomsticks
    <SNIP>
    Silent Movie
    High Anxiety
    Spaceballs

    We may be the only two with High Anxiety on our lists. That Mel Brooks movie doesn't get a lot of love. I will admit that my top two MB movies are Blazing Saddles and Young Frankenstein (both are well over ten times)

    As expected – a lot of classics – epics – musicals – action – but a lot of surprises as well. I think we're also a lot of softees here – a lot of warm fuzzy movies made the list.:D Mine too. My two guilty pleasures that don't show on any other list are Silver Streak and 7 Faces of Dr. Lao.

  30. Warm and fuzzy eh? The film I've seen most times in my life is Robocop. At least once a year since I caught it at the movie theatre 30 years ago. When the time comes, I've requested that my remaining friends hold a screening of Robocop at my wake. Hopefully, that won't be soon.

  31. I have too many too. But first are the WAY more than 25 group that I probably know all dialogue and have at least 1 blu of most:

    Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1972)
    -2 or more times a year, period. And I buy every release that looks like an upgrade. Moving Picture Archive available on amazon has the best one I think. Widescreen, good color, better detail than all the others I have, steady image with lower unnatural lines, okay sound, not a lot of print damage. This film won BAFTA awards and should have a Criterion bluray. I wish they could work that out.

    Wiz of Oz
    -saw for first time in 3D a few weeks ago. WOW! One time out, the poppy field scene might be my favorite 3D. That and the apple trees. Not sure I'll be able to watch flat anymore. I had a thought that they could have left the b&w beginning and end in 2D for effect. But I loved it fine as is.

    Willy Wonka
    Yellowbeard
    The Pirate Movie 1982
    – blu ray please! I own 2 copies of the DVD.
    Ice Pirates
    – nice bluray! I have it and 2 DVDs
    Time Bandits
    -bought everything but the British blu ray. The VHS along with The Shining were my first movie purchases back in the 80s. The recent Criterion is very nice. I plan to pick up Jabberwocky blu ray as well, I have 2 dvds of it. LOVE that film as much as TB.

    Brazil
    The Shining
    The Good the Bad & the Ugly
    -I have like 4 copies of this on blu ray somehow… several different collections. Used to watch this rented vhs, then recorded off cable vhs, then DVD, and now blu. I need to theatrical on blu too. The extra scenes are fine but I like it without best.
    Once Upon a Time in the West
    Creepshow
    -the US bluray is good. No extras, but great print of the film.
    Inspector General

    Not totally sure on these but they are probably nearly 25:

    My Bodyguard (1980). I stayed with my cousins one summer early 80s. We watched this 9 times in one week. Every time it played on a pay channel even in the middle of the night we were there. One of my favorite memories of my teens.
    Odd Couple
    Out of Towners
    Beast Master
    Tootsie
    Arthur
    Vacation

    So many others I'd have to go through my collection.

  32. So, here are the five films I have watched more than any others basically to the point where I have occasionally suffered some burnout…

    1. Dr. Strangelove – I can't tell you how much I love this picture. Over the years I have learned more and more about it and why Kubrick made it and how his fear of nuclear destruction was not only very real but damn near drove him to move to Australia due to his discovery during his research of the topic that it may have been at the time the safest place to be if Russia and the United States launched an attack on each other. Basically, I've come to feel this film covers most of what is right and wrong with the world and how despite our best intentions, due to our being aware that we exist for only a limited amount of time, we are pretty much obsessed as a species with our own annihilation. It's both dark and hilarious in wonderful ways and stands as, in my opinion, one of the most brilliant films ever made…as an entertainment, satire, and social commentary. Everything wonderful about filmmaking to me is contained in this picture.

    2. Apocalypse Now – A friend and I managed to sneak into this picture when I was just 12 years old. I had no idea what it was about at the time but the title intrigued me and I thought it was a horror film about the end of the world. Turned out that's pretty much what it was to me at that point. It seemed to cover some of the same ground as Strangelove except without the laughs. I did not know it was based on Conrad's Heart of Darkness at the time and had not yet read the book but I did feel that the film exposed to me how dark the hearts of men could be. I first purchased this film on VHS and my friends and I watched it over and over and over again. On roads trips in high school and college we would quote from the film constantly. The film to me was never about the Vietnam war but really about, again, how humans as a species go utterly insane when we stand too close to our own true nature. I think that trip up the river is about how any society walks a very fine line between coexistence and utter chaos.

    3. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly – So, watched this every time it was on television as a child. Then got to see it on the big screen in my teens. It was not until I was in my teens that I realized that Clint Eastwood's character is not really a "good" guy and is really just another obsessed mercenary caring little for anybody other than himself and fattening his wallet. In a way the film is a great metaphor for what would become of the United States. Perhaps as an Italian Leone saw this quite clearly and so the three characters in the film just represent our greed and vicious pursuit of cash above all else. Sure, the three characters and their methods may seem a bit different but they are all after the same thing.

    4. Jaws – This has been a summer tradition for me pretty much going back to when I saw it in a theater in 1975. Basically, I think I have suffered complete burnout with this film and have taken a break from it. It is not at all a complex story but it has lots of great little moments and the acting in the film is pretty awesome all the way around. Although mostly known as a "horror" film about a very big and very hungry shark the film is really about men coming together to solve a problem. The three leads are all quite different and they all bring different things to the table and they manage to overcome their differences, pool their strengths and win the battle. Now we all know the three leads in the film but Murray Hamilton as the mayor basically steals every scene he is in and gives a performance better than any supporting actor nominated for an academy award in the past 3 decades. Wow, is he awesome in this! So really, this is an ensemble acting piece masquerading as a horror film about a hungry shark.

    5. Network – My obsession with this film began in the 1980s. I did not see Network in a theater in 1976. Even if I had I would not have likely grasped how brilliant this picture is. I was a freshman in high school when I first saw this picture and boy did it leave a mark. Basically, it touched upon something that Strangelove and Apocalypse also addressed…that as human beings the line between being sane and absolutely bat shit is mighty thin. Not to mention it perfectly predicted the rise of something like FOX News. We don't get much great satire anymore as it seems to be something people now just do not like. There have been some good ones like Thank You for Smoking or I Heart Huckabees (both of which desperately need a blu-ray) but they mostly go totally ignored by the general public.

  33. MatthewA

    Bedknobs and Broomsticks
    My Fair Lady
    The Wizard of Oz (1939)
    Gone With the Wind
    Oklahoma!
    South Pacific (1958)
    The King and I (1956)
    Grease (1978)
    Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory
    Pete's Dragon (1977)
    Annie (1982)
    The Muppet Movie
    Forrest Gump
    E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
    Who Framed Roger Rabbit
    Pinocchio
    Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
    Dumbo
    The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
    Pee-Wee's Big Adventure
    Cinderella
    The Great Muppet Caper
    Return To Oz
    Oliver!
    Bye Bye Birdie (1963)
    Auntie Mame
    The Music Man
    Gypsy (1962 and 1993)
    Alice In Wonderland (1951)
    West Side Story
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Network
    Blazing Saddles
    Pink Flamingos
    Hairspray (1988)
    Airplane!
    Serial Mom
    Female Trouble
    All That Jazz
    The Producers (1968)
    Smile
    Robin Hood (1973)
    What's Up, Doc?
    The Naked Gun
    Honey I Shrunk The Kids
    Drop Dead Gorgeous
    Ed Wood
    Soapdish
    Desperate Living
    Young Frankenstein
    The Little Mermaid
    Beauty and the Beast (1991)
    The Jungle Book (1967)
    Pollyanna (1960)
    The Sword in the Stone (1963)
    The Brave Little Toaster
    Silent Movie
    High Anxiety
    Spaceballs

    Still waiting on "Spaceballs II – The Search for More Money"

  34. Reggie W

    So, here are the five films I have watched more than any others basically to the point where I have occasionally suffered some burnout…

    1. Dr. Strangelove – I can't tell you how much I love this picture. Over the years I have learned more and more about it and why Kubrick made it and how his fear of nuclear destruction was not only very real but damn near drove him to move to Australia due to his discovery during his research of the topic that it may have been at the time the safest place to be if Russia and the United States launched an attack on each other. Basically, I've come to feel this film covers most of what is right and wrong with the world and how despite our best intentions, due to our being aware that we exist for only a limited amount of time, we are pretty much obsessed as a species with our own annihilation. It's both dark and hilarious in wonderful ways and stands as, in my opinion, one of the most brilliant films ever made…as an entertainment, satire, and social commentary. Everything wonderful about filmmaking to me is contained in this picture.

    2. Apocalypse Now – A friend and I managed to sneak into this picture when I was just 12 years old. I had no idea what it was about at the time but the title intrigued me and I thought it was a horror film about the end of the world. Turned out that's pretty much what it was to me at that point. It seemed to cover some of the same ground as Strangelove except without the laughs. I did not know it was based on Conrad's Heart of Darkness at the time and had not yet read the book but I did feel that the film exposed to me how dark the hearts of men could be. I first purchased this film on VHS and my friends and I watched it over and over and over again. On roads trips in high school and college we would quote from the film constantly. The film to me was never about the Vietnam war but really about, again, how humans as a species go utterly insane when we stand too close to our own true nature. I think that trip up the river is about how any society walks a very fine line between coexistence and utter chaos.

    3. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly – So, watched this every time it was on television as a child. Then got to see it on the big screen in my teens. It was not until I was in my teens that I realized that Clint Eastwood's character is not really a "good" guy and is really just another obsessed mercenary caring little for anybody other than himself and fattening his wallet. In a way the film is a great metaphor for what would become of the United States. Perhaps as an Italian Leone saw this quite clearly and so the three characters in the film just represent our greed and vicious pursuit of cash above all else. Sure, the three characters and their methods may seem a bit different but they are all after the same thing.

    4. Jaws – This has been a summer tradition for me pretty much going back to when I saw it in a theater in 1975. Basically, I think I have suffered complete burnout with this film and have taken a break from it. It is not at all a complex story but it has lots of great little moments and the acting in the film is pretty awesome all the way around. Although mostly known as a "horror" film about a very big and very hungry shark the film is really about men coming together to solve a problem. The three leads are all quite different and they all bring different things to the table and they manage to overcome their differences, pool their strengths and win the battle. Now we all know the three leads in the film but Murray Hamilton as the mayor basically steals every scene he is in and gives a performance better than any supporting actor nominated for an academy award in the past 3 decades. Wow, is he awesome in this! So really, this is an ensemble acting piece masquerading as a horror film about a hungry shark.

    5. Network – My obsession with this film began in the 1980s. I did not see Network in a theater in 1976. Even if I had I would not have likely grasped how brilliant this picture is. I was a freshman in high school when I first saw this picture and boy did it leave a mark. Basically, it touched upon something that Strangelove and Apocalypse also addressed…that as human beings the line between being sane and absolutely bat shit is mighty thin. Not to mention it perfectly predicted the rise of something like FOX News. We don't get much great satire anymore as it seems to be something people now just do not like. There have been some good ones like Thank You for Smoking or I Heart Huckabees (both of which desperately need a blu-ray) but they mostly go totally ignored by the general public.

    Great list! As someone said before, simply too many to name.

  35. There are a LOT of films I've watched more than 10 times. Here's the ones I've watched more than 25 times:

    The Wizard of Oz
    Miracle on 34th Street
    Star Wars
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Field of Dreams

    There may be a few others. But the film I've watched more times than any other:

    The Majestic

    Which is saying a lot because it is only 17 years old.

    Mark

  36. It is SO great to see someone else is an even bigger fan of The Seven Faces of Dr. Lao than I am. I probably would have watched it even more than I have if we had a Blu-ray rather than an OK DVD.

    I remember leaving the theater after seeing it for the first time and heading right to the local record store to buy the soundtrack album. Alas, there wasn't one! It took decades for one to finally come out.

  37. I have a group of all-time favorites that I've watched annually (some more than annually) for the last 30 years, either on TV, VHS, DVD or BD….

    All the Bond films
    Where Eagles Dare
    The Guns of Navarone
    Ice Station Zebra
    Ben-Hur
    LOA
    Them!
    It's a Wonderful Life
    True Grit
    The Wizard of Oz
    Battle of the Bulge
    The Great Escape
    Chinatown
    Singin in the Rain
    The Sound of Music
    Dr Zhivago

    I'm sure there are dozens more I've seen 10+ times but these are my go-to's

  38. BobO’Link

    Looking over everyone's lists I'm seeing several I forgot! The most egregious omissions (some not mentioned by others) are:

    Monty Python and the Holy Grail (20+)
    The Life of Brian (20+)
    Time Bandits
    This is Spinal Tap
    Sinbad the Sailor
    (20+)
    The Treasure of the Sierra Madre
    The Shining
    A Clockwork Orange

    Just how did I not put those on my original list!?!

    I'm conservative about the Monty Python movies. I think Meaning of Life should be on mine. I've watched it much more than the others. I still have a recorded VHS with narration before the opening short and before the movie starts. I've never seen that on any of the releases. I have the bought VHS, the DVD that was supposed to be flawed and finally a nice blu ray.

  39. Matt Hough

    It is SO great to see someone else is an even bigger fan of The Seven Faces of Dr. Lao than I am. I probably would have watched it even more than I have if we had a Blu-ray rather than an OK DVD.

    I remember leaving the theater after seeing it for the first time and heading right to the local record store to buy the soundtrack album. Alas, there wasn't one! It took decades for one to finally come out.

    Many of my viewings were on the big screen. I really enjoyed the movie and took a lot of friends to see it. The advertising was so bad that they had all given it a pass.
    I also wish we had a Blu ray but I don't expect one.

  40. There's no doubt, many films that I've seen more than 10 times (Although I never got into the habit of keeping a written record!), as I was in the habit of giving titles many multiple viewings in my youth.

    Among my 10+ timers that I've viewed at least once within the last 5 years:

    HARD DAY'S NIGHT, A (1964)
    HELP! (1965)
    DRACULA (1931)
    WIZARD OF OZ, THE (1939)
    MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS (1944)
    EASTER PARADE (1948)
    EAST OF EDEN (1955)
    IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE (1946)
    TITANIC (1997)
    SONS OF THE DESERT (1933)
    WAY OUT WEST (1937)
    FLYING DEUCES, THE (1939)
    SCROOGE: A CHRISTMAS CAROL (1951)
    LEMON DROP KID, THE (1951)
    SINGIN' IN THE RAIN (1952)
    MIRACLE ON 34TH STREET (1947)

    CHEERS! 🙂

  41. Thanks to the OP – this has turned out to be such a fun thread (kissin’ cousin to Discaholics Anonymous almost).

    Yes, the more I read other’s lists, the more films I realise I left out, including:

    Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory

    Apollo 13

    The Guns of Navarone

    The Odd Couple

    Barefoot in the Park

    Doctor Strangelove

    Patton

    Signs

    Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion (you heard me!)

    Ferris Bueller’s Day Off

    Men in Black

    Matilda

    Seven Brides…

    and no doubt more!

  42. Just from memory and at a brief listing. I know there are many more.

    Planet of the Apes (1968)
    Beneath the Planet of the Apes
    Jaws (pretty much every summer for the past 20 years)
    The Godfather
    The Godfather Part II
    The Towering Inferno
    The Poseidon Adventure
    The Man With the Golden Gun
    Psycho
    Casablanca
    It's A wonderful Life
    Rope
    Vertigo
    Rear Window
    Saboteur
    Citizen Kane
    The Wizard of Oz
    The Third Man
    To Kill A Mockingbird
    The Caine Mutiny
    Touch of Evil
    North By Northwest
    Double Indemnity
    Follow Me Boys
    Darby O'Gill and the Little People
    Old Yeller
    Star Trek – The Motion Picture
    Star Wars (Ep. IV)
    Star Trek II
    Alien
    Aliens
    Yankee Doodle Dandy
    Singin' In The Rain
    Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
    The Searchers
    The Cowboys
    Unforgiven
    Dirty Harry

    I enjoy escaping with my favorite films, they are like old friends.

  43. Like everyone else…so many that I love!
    I've seen the Rathbone/Bruce Sherlock Holmes films so many times that I know the names of all of the minor players and can almost recite the scripts from memory! Closely followed by the Universal 1930s-1940s horror cycle.

  44. titch

    Warm and fuzzy eh? The film I've seen most times in my life is Robocop. At least once a year since I caught it at the movie theatre 30 years ago. When the time comes, I've requested that my remaining friends hold a screening of Robocop at my wake. Hopefully, that won't be soon.

    Great film and another that should never have been remade as you just can't improve on the original. I'm watching "That 70's Show" on Netflix now and it still amazes me to see Kurtwood Smith in a comedic role after laying down that classic Clarence Boddicker.

    "I'd buy that for a dollar."

  45. For me, it's all childhood favourites. The original Star Wars movies, Indiana Jones, the Bond films, The Wizard of Oz on TV, Alien, most of Kubrick's films, Blade Runner. The Connery and Moore Bonds I've probably seen 25 times. And Raiders even more – I watched it several times the summer it was released and have seen it about once a year every year since.

    But I don't believe there's any movie released after I became an adult that I've seen 10 times. Maybe Die Hard, and that barely qualifies, as it came out when I was 19. The vast majority of films, even those I really like, I only watch once. A few I might see 2 or 3 times, at most. The Big Lebowski might be up to 5 or 6 at this point.

  46. The Godfather
    The Godfather Part 2
    Psycho
    North by Northwest
    The Birds
    Strangers on A Train
    Rear Window
    Vertigo
    A Clockwork Orange
    Dr. Strangelove
    2001 A Space Odyssey
    The Shining
    It's A Wonderful Life
    Miracle on 34th Street
    The Bishops Wife
    A Christmas Story
    Taxi Driver
    Raging Bull
    Goodfellas
    Apocalypse Now
    Wait Until Dark
    West Side Story
    A Streetcar Named Desire
    From Here to Eternity
    On the Waterfront
    East of Eden
    Rebel Without a Cause
    Giant
    A Place in the Sun
    Shane
    High Noon
    The Searchers
    How Green Was My Valley
    Citizen Kane
    Touch of Evil
    The Manchurian Candidate
    Lawrence of Arabia
    Bridge on the River kwai
    A Night to Remember
    The Dirty Dozen
    The Great Escape
    The Apartment
    Some Like it Hot
    One Two Three
    The Fortune Cookie
    Stalag 17
    Sabrina
    Sunset Boulevard
    Double Indemnity
    The Best Years of Our Lives
    The Producers
    Blazing Saddles
    Annie Hall
    Hannah and Her Sisters
    Do the Right Thing
    12 Angry Men
    Sweet Smell of Success
    A Face in the Crowd
    A Hatful of Rain
    One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Murder on the Orient Express
    Goldfinger
    From Russia With Love
    The Last Picture Show
    His Girl Friday
    Red River
    Jaws
    Close Encounters of the Third kind
    ET
    Star Wars
    Tootsie
    The Graduate
    Catch 22
    A Hard Days Night
    Help !

    A lot of these viewings were from when I upgraded formats from VHS to LaserDisc to DVD to Blu-ray

  47. I've seen many films more than 10 times so it would be laborious for readers to go through my list. My top 5 (good idea Reggie W) though that I am sure have watched probably closer to 30 times (maybe more) are:

    Lawrence of Arabia
    The Ten Commandments (used to watch this everytime it came on ABC)
    Vertigo
    The Omega Man (loved this film ever since I was a little kid when it came on the ABC Sunday Night Movie quite often)
    All the President's Men (discovered this one a bit later in life but have watched it many times)

    These are not necessarily my favorite all time films (most of them are) but the ones I definitely watched the most.

    Terminator 2 is up there too, but not by choice. My brother had the VHS and insisted on watching it all the time. I guess I could have gotten up and done something else but what the heck… I thought the film was great but not after 20+ viewings. I'm sure he wore those tapes out (I believe it was on 2 tapes, some kind of special edition).

  48. BobO’Link

    I work with a late 20ish woman that I've been introducing to classic films. She loves movies, and we discuss them fairly regularly, but one day she said "I really haven't seen many movies made before the mid-70s. Are there some you could recommend?" OH BOY! DID I!!!

    She's been working her way through a longish list I provided (and I'm usually the source of the copy she watches). She'd also not seen many BW movies, declaring them "Not as good because they're not color." That got my ire up a bit! She loves horror films so I started her with a few BW classics: Invasion of the Body Snatchers, The Thing that Couldn't Die, Dracula, Frankenstein, The Wolf Man, and threw in The Day the Earth Stood Still for good measure. They made her a believer that "BW films can be really good!" and she's now seen quite a few BW comedy and drama movies.

    Before that fateful day, she'd not seen most of the movies on most of the lists here unless it was produced after ~1980. That was about a year and a half ago. She's now seen 50 or so pre-70s classics, many of which are on my "seen it more than 10 times" list.

    A convert!!! I understand. My kids used to always surf the channels passing anything in B&W. The old fart (me) would pretty much only stop on B&W. I love color – wide screen – stereo (dolby) and 3D – but nothing tops a good story for real immersion – when necessary my brain fills in the rest.

  49. Mark Booth

    There are a LOT of films I've watched more than 10 times. Here's the ones I've watched more than 25 times:

    The Wizard of Oz
    Miracle on 34th Street
    Star Wars
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Field of Dreams

    There may be a few others. But the film I've watched more times than any other:

    The Majestic

    Which is saying a lot because it is only 17 years old.

    Mark

    All you need is another 17 more years and you'll be hitting that 50th viewing of "The Majestic" before you know it.

  50. In no particular order, watched at least 10 times:
    Citizen Kane
    Casablanca
    Five Easy Pieces
    Shampoo
    The Pink Panther (the first one)
    Vertigo
    Dracula (Lugosi)
    Don't Look Now
    The Graduate
    The Conversation
    Easy Rider
    Annie Hall
    Manhattan
    Hard Eight
    To Have and Have Not
    Young Frankenstein
    ….and quite a few others that escape my mind at the moment.

  51. Just curious as to why the great majority of the films listed in this thread are so old, few in the last 20 years, not many in the last 40 years. Is the general sentiment that "the classics are the best"?

  52. Being a teenager in the 80's meant I saw a lot of things over and over again on VHS, and many of them are classics or cult classics (at least for my generation) but not exactly "fine film". Here's my list, in no particular order:

    Sixteen Candles
    Weird Science
    Breakfast Club
    Revenge of the Nerds
    The Highlander
    Shawshank Redemption
    Wizard of Oz
    Sound of Music
    Grease
    Flash Gordon (but not since the 80s)
    A Christmas Story (every year, at least once, so more than 25)
    Forest Gump
    Princess Bride
    Blazing Saddles
    The Outlaw Josey Wales
    Moonraker
    Singles (4 times in the theater, most of any film for me)
    Almost Famous
    The Matrix
    Star Wars
    The Empire Strikes Back (by far the best of all the SW movies, IMHO)
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Terminator
    Rocky
    The Lord of the Rings trilogy
    Tommy Boy
    Office Space
    Full Metal Jacket
    Lethal Weapon
    Beetlejuice

    For some of these, I hang my head in shame. But what can I say, in your teens and early 20's there are a lot of things that you get over-excited about. As I approach being 50, I am more into quality than quantity and there is so much amazing film out there that I don't revisit much these days.

  53. Dave_T

    Just curious as to why the great majority of the films listed in this thread are so old, few in the last 20 years, not many in the last 40 years. Is the general sentiment that "the classics are the best"?

    A lot of the films on my list I probably first discovered when I was in my early teens, when I really fell in love with movies. So they've remained deeply loved favorites that are still important to me, and still have relevance.

    Many of them I first caught on TV (often with commercials, when that was the only game in town). Several I caight in revival houses, which were fairly plentiful in NYC in the 1970s and 1980s. So these favorites have been a part of my life for many years, going back to adolescnce. As home video came along, I bought many titles first on VHS than laser disc than DVD and finally blu-ray (and probably 4K when I get around to getting the equipmnt)

  54. Dave_T

    Just curious as to why the great majority of the films listed in this thread are so old, few in the last 20 years, not many in the last 40 years. Is the general sentiment that "the classics are the best"?

    I’m curious too, about something altogether different:

    Couldn’t help but notice that this thread has brought several members out of their shells.

    The 3 posts immediately above this one have been made by people who have collectively been HTF members for around 40 years, yet (as at now) have made a grand total of 15 posts in that time – including the 3 posts above.

    Glad to make your acquaintance, and well done to the OP (Marv/Mysto) for dreaming up such a good topic to have encouraged broad participation.

    Another of mine: Green Card

    [Edit: …and Dave, regarding your question, perhaps it’s a combination of the quality of the classics, together with the fact that older titles have been around so much longer, providing chances for repeat viewings spread out over a long time, without risk of over-exposure]

  55. Dave_T

    Just curious as to why the great majority of the films listed in this thread are so old, few in the last 20 years, not many in the last 40 years. Is the general sentiment that "the classics are the best"?

    I think that part of it is that the films that you see when you're young are the ones that grab you the most. Another part of it is simply the passage of time. If you watch a film once every couple of years, over 20 years you'll have seen it 10 times. Watching a film that's only 5 or 6 years old at the same rate, you'll only see it 2 or 3 times.

  56. Watched all of these more than 10 times each, easily:

    Airplane!
    Blade Runner
    Bride of Frankenstein
    A Christmas Carol (1951)
    Dark Knight
    Detour (1945)
    Empire Strikes Back
    Frankenstein
    The Incredible Shrinking Man
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)
    It's a Wonderful Life
    The Matrix
    Pulp Fiction
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Return of the Jedi
    Star Wars
    Superman: The Movie
    Temple of Doom
    Terminator
    The Thing
    Watchmen
    Wizard of Oz
    The Wolf Man (1941)

    I am sure there are more.

  57. Dave_T

    Just curious as to why the great majority of the films listed in this thread are so old, few in the last 20 years, not many in the last 40 years. Is the general sentiment that "the classics are the best"?

    Some of this is population bias. I suspect the people that frequent a forum such as this are real movie buffs and collectors. That means that there is usually an area of interest, not just watches movies. Example – I got into the "hobby" by wanting to see Laurel and Hardy movies. This was before video tape – so I bought an 8mm sound projector. Then vcr – then dvd – then blu ray and a video projector. Many other areas have got my interest (mostly b mystery movie series from the 30's and 40's. Others on the forum love other genre and their lists reflect those. But I still love movies and watch other newer material when it captures my interest.

    I think that's one of the things that makes these lists so fascinating – seeing what gives joy to other movie watchers. I have a whole new list of things to watch or re-watch.

    Of course, as others have said, some of it is just time. Also recognize that you are in many cases looking at the cream of the crop. Most of AFI's top 100 movies of all time are represented and that covers a lot of time. Recent films can make the lists, but just like in the past – only a few.

  58. Buckaroo Banzai – once a year since the first home video (VHS, yay!) came out
    Big Trouble in Little China (usually as part of a triple feature with Buckaroo Banzai and…)
    Jake Speed (the third part of the B-movie triple feature with Buckaroo Banzai and Big Trouble)
    Deadpool
    The Wizard of Oz
    It's a Wonderful Life
    Captain America: The First Avenger
    Raiders of the Lost Ark (well over 100 times)
    E.T. (well over 100 times)
    Star Wars: A New Hope (well over 200 times)
    El Dorado (the John Wayne film) (more than a dozen times)
    Court Jester (The pellet with the poison…)
    The Terminator (15+)
    T2 (15+)
    The Magnificent Seven (original recipe)
    Zatoichi: The Blind Swordsman (10+)
    Superman: The Movie
    Superman II
    Batman
    Guardians of the Galaxy (12)
    The Maltese Falcon
    Godzilla/Gojira

  59. Mysto

    Everybody has favorites. Those goto movies that we can watch again and again. What movie(s) have you watched at least 10 times? Special award if it's over 25 times.

    I'll tip mine later.

    I have five children and six grandchildren, and I have always tried to bring them up to watch the great movies of the past rather than just slavishly following the crowd and watching the latest (usually instantly forgettable) blockbusters. So there are many movies I have watched ten times, although few, if any, would have reached twenty-five times! I won't try to list all of them, but here are a few which would go WAY over ten viewings:

    A Star is Born (1954). (I would have watched that ten times during its initial release! And with every re-release and restoration, back I go again!)
    All About Eve (my choice as the best movie ever made).
    The Band Wagon
    Meet Me in St Louis
    Strangers on a Train
    The Court Jester
    North by Northwest
    The Wizard of Oz
    Sunset Boulevard
    I Could Go on Singing
    On the Town
    The Yearling

  60. This is a really interesting thread. My top 3 takeaways so far:

    1. I never would have expected the Margaret Rutherford Miss Marple movies to show up at all, not to mention a couple of times. Nice to see them getting a nod.

    2. It's clear that Hitchcock's best movies (particularly North by Northwest and Vertigo) are highly rewatchable. The same can be said for the James Bond films — which, interestingly, were originally somewhat inspired by North by Northwest.

    3. Holiday season movies are likely contenders because many of us grew up seeing them year after year on TV. However, I don't remember my No. 1 holiday movie (the 1970 Scrooge) being included in that annual grouping.

    Since I haven't seen two of my favorites show up so far (I could have missed them on a previous list), I'll add them here:

    The Umbrellas of Cherbourg
    The Young Girls of Rochefort

  61. Dave_T

    Just curious as to why the great majority of the films listed in this thread are so old, few in the last 20 years, not many in the last 40 years. Is the general sentiment that "the classics are the best"?

    There was a period of time when one could participate in a somewhat controlled experiment on the question of "Good/great older films vs good/great modern films, which worked better with an audience?", but the conditions no longer exist to run that experiment. I'm talking about a period of time from around the mid/late 1960s to the early/mid 90s. In those days almost every big city had a handful of decent revival theaters that still attracted sizable audiences of older folks who were familiar with the movies being shown and younger folks who had either been brought by their older friends or just showed up as a movie-going date option over the usual modern fare.

    Mind you, this would have been a time when tv showings of older films were still riddled with cuts and commercial interruptions, home video versions in the later years of that time period were plagued with middling to poor picture and sound quality and, for the vast majority of us, our living room "theater" environment was not much improvement over what we enjoyed during the first run of The Honeymooners and I Love Lucy. Seeing those films at the revival theaters was really the first time that younger generations had ever seen them as they were meant to be seen.

    Many of my friends and I were then intensely interested in this admittedly unscientific survey question and frequented those revival theaters almost weekly as well as watching modern movies in regular theaters even more frequently.

    Have to say the results were shockingly obvious. In virtually every case, a good/great older movie KICKED ASS with the audiences in terms of eliciting an emotional response the filmmakers clearly intended to elicit. They laughed big where the laughs were meant to come, they dabbed away tears, gasped in fear, were gripped with tension and worry over what would happen next and so on. Those movies took their audience for a group "ride" that felt glorious. Not in absolutely every case, of course. But often and consistently enough to suggest this was no mere accomplishment of a rare few classics.

    Meanwhile, for the most part, the emotional "ride" provided by those then modern 1980s/1990s films was as tepid as hours old dishwater. Not saying the stories, filmmaking techniques and performances were bad exactly. It's just that audiences somehow managed to watch them in more of a passive state, not really being required or even asked by the filmmakers to produce much of an emotional response. Yes, there were exceptions here and there. But precious few.

    That is now an experiment that can no longer be duplicated. Great home video presentations of almost every one of the movies on our lists in this thread are readily available and we can screen them in wonderful home theaters with very big screens and terrific sound. It might be a rare occasion when there are more than 3 people sitting in those home theaters to watch a movie complete and uninterrupted from start to finish. And they won't be strangers to each other but people who know each other very well, which is another important element missing from a real commercial screening experience.

    There might be a few revival type houses in some big cities but the small audiences that attend them will now be only the most passionate fans of a particular movie or perhaps film students. During that time period I mentioned above, it was not uncommon to show up for a screening of Singin' in the Rain and The Wizard of Oz at one of the better revival houses and find it sold out an hour before showtime.

    I have no idea if that unscientific and highly informal "accidental" experiment of decades ago proves anything to anyone other than me. But for me it was a revelation how much more effective with a collection of strangers those older movies were at eliciting an emotional ride than the big modern blockbusters showing at the multiplex down the street. And I think that contributes immensely to the re-watchability of a movie.

  62. Twenty or more times:
    Star Wars
    Empire Strikes Back
    Return of the Jedi
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
    Ghostbusters
    The Princess Bride
    The Sure Thing
    When Harry Met Sally
    It's a Wonderful Life
    National Lampoons Christmas Vacation
    Groundhog Day
    ET
    Field of Dreams
    Star Trek II The Wrath of Khan
    Star Trek IV The Voyage Home
    Star Trek VI The Undiscovered Country

    Most of these I watch at some point every year. The list of ten to twenty viewings would be too long to list here.

  63. Dave_T

    Just curious as to why the great majority of the films listed in this thread are so old, few in the last 20 years, not many in the last 40 years. Is the general sentiment that "the classics are the best"?

    It isn't that I don't enjoy some contemporary films quite a bit. I expect films such as Blade Runner 2049, Inception, The Revenant, and Star Wars: The Force Awakens to name a few will be making the 10+ list in the coming decade; but there are a lot more programming choices available these days for me (between cable and streaming services and tv on DVD/Blu-Ray). In the past, when I rang up a lot of my viewings of films from my list I only had broadcast television so a lot more of my discretionary viewing was directed towards my library of VHS and Laserdisc films.

    – Walter.

  64. Cool thread idea, Mysto!

    A bit late to the party…Many on my list of most watched films have already been mentioned several times over, but there are a few from my personal list that I haven't seen mentioned yet.

    Watched 20-plus times or more:

    The Professionals (1966) – my all time favorite film
    Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Casablanca
    It's a Wonderful Life
    On Her Majesty's Secret Service
    Rear Window
    The Great Escape
    The Big Country
    The Magnificent Seven
    Hatari!
    Rio Bravo

    Watched 10 times or more:

    The Three Musketeers (1973)
    Aliens
    The Thin Man
    The Yakuza
    Rocky
    The Mark of Zorro
    The Adventures of Robin Hood
    Planet of the Apes (1968)
    Jaws
    To Have and Have Not
    The Quiet Man
    Shane
    The Searchers
    To Have and Have Not
    Thunderball
    For Your Eyes Only
    The Birds
    North by Northwest
    The Fog
    El Dorado
    Donovan's Reef
    The Omega Man
    The Thing from Another World
    The Thing (1982)
    The Wild Geese
    For a Few Dollars More

    I'm sure there are dozens of others that I can't think of right now.

    Dave_T

    Just curious as to why the great majority of the films listed in this thread are so old, few in the last 20 years, not many in the last 40 years. Is the general sentiment that "the classics are the best"?

    While most of my most-watched films are older, there are a few films from the past 20 years that I've watched a lot…maybe none 10 times or more (yet), but I will likely reach that number in another decade or so. Some of these (from 1998 and up) that I've watched 5 times or more would include: The Matrix, Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, LOTR: The Fellowship of the Ring, The Last Samurai, Guardians of the Galaxy, and Jack Reacher (for my money one of the best action thrillers to come down the pike in a long time).

  65. Dave_T

    Just curious as to why the great majority of the films listed in this thread are so old, few in the last 20 years, not many in the last 40 years. Is the general sentiment that "the classics are the best"?

    Well, depends upon when you were born I would say. Being born in 1967 I grew up having to go to a cinema to see a film and watching films on television. There was no format for me to watch a film countless times at home. So, when there was a television showing of a film I liked or had an interest in I was there. It was a big deal back then that you could sit at home and watch a film that had played in the theaters. I was introduced to films of the 1930s through the 1960s on television. There was no rewind button, no pause button and the commercials were useful to go get food or take a bathroom break.

    So, when you really liked a film your chance to see it again may only come once a year when a television station would show it. I think the reason so many kids in those days fell in love with monsters was there were stations all over the country that would have a "Creature Double Feature" every weekend. So, we'd be there watching giant ants or vampires or invisible men doing strange things. My introduction to Hammer Films came from watching television showings and thinking "Wow, these films are amazing!"

    It was the same with Westerns, they would show a couple on the weekends. I will tell you that a film like The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly did not gain the reputation it has through cinema screenings…it was shown on television quite a bit and people tuned in over and over again. It was television that turned it into a popular film. Many more people experienced it over and over on TV and that's how it became the touchstone it is now.

    A couple other things that greatly influenced how I feel about films occurred during these times. In the 1970s the director became a central focus and directors gained much more power and influence over how their pictures were made. So, the films would be much more personal creations. They did not have to fit a formula and this made each film experience quite different.

    In the 1980s we began to see the rise of the sequel and the "formula" picture start to sort of explode. This is probably now at its apex and while we did get the rise of independent filmmaking during the late 1980s through the 1990s the funding stream for this kind of thing as well as the desire to have smaller films geared toward adults has shrunk.

    So, the issue for somebody like me with more recent films is fewer and fewer interesting films get made, directors are no longer a major influence on how and what films get made, they don't really want films to be anything more complex than what a middle school child can grasp, and so the vast majority of films of more recent vintage are not worth viewing more than once. One trip through them is enough and you move on to the next one.

    Now that's not to say that there are not good films being made but they do seem to come from a small handful of people that have managed to continue work during these days of super heroes, franchises and sequels. I honestly don't see recent super hero, franchise, or sequel productions as "great re-watchable films" because they are all formula, run on a stopwatch product more than anything else…to me anyway.

    Post the year 2000, No Country for Old Men, Wonder Boys, Thank You for Smoking, I Heart Huckabees, The Royal Tenenbaums, There Will Be Blood, and The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada are films I can name off the top of my head that I have watched several times and will easily eclipse the "10 times" number if they have not already. I know Annihilation which I have already seen twice will easily become a film I see more than 10 times.

    The common thing for me with these films is they all have a very obvious stamp of the people that created them. They are not generic nor will they appeal to everybody nor are they meant to.

    So, older films have been around longer and due to this fact we have had more opportunities to watch them many times but I also just think the number of films being made that reward multiple viewings is shrinking because they are not designed for multiple viewings they are just designed to have a great opening weekend box office take. So, literally these films are made to be king for 4 days then to be replaced by the next king a week later. Honestly, it is almost the same as how they make appliances cheaper and to last less time because their main concern is not to provide you with a great long lasting product…it is really about selling you the next one.

  66. skylark68

    I've seen many films more than 10 times so it would be laborious for readers to go through my list. My top 5 (good idea Reggie W) though that I am sure have watched probably closer to 30 times (maybe more)

    I just tried to pick a quick 5 because like a lot of other people there are a lot of films I have seen more than 10 times. The 5 I picked I just know I have seen a ridiculous number of times but…they always hold up. Yes, when I look at my short list of 5 I feel like I missed a lot that should be on there. Like none of the Welles films are there and I have seen several of his films more than 10 times. I mean Citizen Kane and Touch of Evil (a favorite of mine and my brother) I have certainly seen more than 25 times.

    I have seen A Clockwork Orange countless times and it should be in my top 5 but I already had a Kubrick in there.

    I have seen Being There more than 20 times. Love that film. Basically, these sort of lists are a jumping off point. I have seen The Wild Bunch more than 30 times. I think I watched every TV showing of The Great Escape in the 1970s and into the 1980s and then watched it on home video formats. So, that's over 10 easily. Also went to see an outdoor showing of it on a big screen. Same with 2001, North by Northwest, there are just so many. The Godfather obviously I have seen a lot. Recently watched the third Godfather film, generally thought to be a turkey, but it made the list of 1000 greatest pictures over at They Shoot Pictures Don't They which is a list I look at from time to time.

    The thing is, yes, my list of films that I have watched a lot is going to be heavily dominated by films made prior to 1985 and very heavy on things from say 1940-1979…which is my real sweet spot for filmmaking. I have films I love made after 1985 but the list gets tighter and tighter. I mean, it is a really good year for me if they make 3 films I think I might want to revisit now.

    Blade Runner 2049 I have already seen 4 times…love it. 2017 was not a bad year I think films like The Killing of a Sacred Deer, mother!, Phantom Thread, and Dunkirk are all films I will watch several times and that will likely reward multiple viewings. Maybe Three Billboards will as well though I feel pretty satisfied having now seen it twice. I am going to watch The Shape of Water again soon so that will be my second viewing of that and I will probably not watch that again for some time after having seen it twice…just a guess.

    I just watched The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly (the Kino blu for the first time) last night. I was once again swept up in the film and how f-ing beautiful it is. When I am reaching for a film off my shelves to watch in my home theater it will likely be an older film in that 1940-1985 range because those films dominate my collection and are the films I most find myself wanting to revisit.

    I really enjoyed something like Wind River and it was one of the better films I saw last year but I don't know how often I will revisit it. It feels like once I hit three or 4 times with it I may not come back to it again unless there is a reason to do so.

  67. Last night the blues brothers came on hbo for the umpteenth time when I finally sat down for a few minutes to relax. And of course I was immediately sucked in.

    A friends older brother took my friend and me to see this during its original run and I immediately loved it. Then watched it repeatedly during its initial cable run. And many more times since. It doesn’t what part of the movie I come in on, I’m always sucked in.

    I’ve seen this easily over a hundred times, and my boys, now 14 & 19 have seen it probably 10 times.

    Funny thing is, I’ve never owned this film. I keep meaning to buy it on blu, but there are too many editions. And it seems it’s always on tv. But if it were released on UHD, it would be a day one purchase.

  68. Dave_T

    Just curious as to why the great majority of the films listed in this thread are so old, few in the last 20 years, not many in the last 40 years. Is the general sentiment that "the classics are the best"?

    I can find something to like in just about any film but the classics do tend to excel in story and true acting proficiency IMO. Newer films have awesome special effects, etc, which I also immensely enjoy, but they [with some exceptions] are usually either revisits of classic material or just not as enveloping.

  69. I fell in love with the blues as a little boy. I recall looking through my parents record collection and finding titles by guys like John Lee Hooker, Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf, B.B. King and others and thinking "Wow, these guys have the coolest names!" and pulling the records out and playing them just because of the names. Then hearing them I was blown away.

    So, when we went to see The Blues Brothers at the cinema and then at a drive-in it was an epic moment for me to see people like John Lee Hooker, Ray Charles, Cab Calloway, Aretha Franklin and James Brown up there on the big screen doing their thing. When John Lee Hooker popped up on screen I think I stood up in my seat…because I had not seen these people on television or anywhere else other than photos on album covers or in my imagination.

    I have seen this film probably more than 50 times.

  70. Since I've been keeping track of My Top Movies on "My Docs" I've seen the following at least 10 times, and many of them a lot more:

    Sunset Blvd (1950, my personal favorite)
    Gentleman's Agreement (1947)
    Ben-Hur (1959)
    Rear Window (1954)
    Show Boat (1951)
    Singin' in the Rain (1952)
    East of Eden (1955)
    Hud (1963)
    To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)
    Born Yesterday (1950)
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)
    A Place in the Sun (1951)
    Giant (1956)
    Shane (1953)
    Strangers on a Train (1951)
    The Lady Eve (1941)
    Coney Island (1943)
    Meet Me in St. Louis (1944)
    State Fair (1945)
    Funny Girl (1968)
    North By Northwest (1959)
    Double Indemnity (1944)
    Plus many more Film noir!

  71. filmnoirguy

    Since I've been keeping track of My Top Movies on "My Docs" I've seen the following at least 10 times, and many of them a lot more:

    Sunset Blvd (1950, my personal favorite)
    Gentleman's Agreement (1947)
    Ben-Hur (1959)
    Rear Window (1954)
    Show Boat (1951)
    Singin' in the Rain (1952)
    East of Eden (1955)
    Hud (1963)
    To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)
    Born Yesterday (1950)
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)
    A Place in the Sun (1951)
    Giant (1956)
    Shane (1953)
    Strangers on a Train (1951)
    The Lady Eve (1941)
    Coney Island (1943)
    Meet Me in St. Louis (1944)
    State Fair (1945)
    Funny Girl (1968)
    North By Northwest (1959)
    Double Indemnity (1944)
    Plus many more Film noir!

    That is indeed a great list. Most of my favourite movies are in there somewhere, and I also love the film noir, so I would be interested to hear your "follow-up" list of all the film noir you might have included. I admit that's such a rich lode to be mined that it would be difficult to know where to start…. but do try, anyway!

  72. I can't count how often I watched films on TV during the last 40+ years.

    But I can count how often I watched films at the movies or at home:

    1.) STAR WARS = 31x (5 at theaters + 26x at home)
    2.) THE RETURN OF THE JEDI = 26x (5x + 21x)
    3.) THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK = 24x (3x + 21x)
    4.) THE PHANTOM MENACE = 15x (5x + 10x)
    " ) THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN = 15x (1x + 14x)
    5.) THE ATTAC OF THE CLONES ) 14x (4x + 11x)
    " ) RIO BRAVO = 14x (1x + 13x)
    6.) REVENGE OF THE SITH = 13x (4x + 9x)
    7.) THE FIFTH ELEMENT = 12x (2x + 10x)
    8.) FROM DUSK TILL DAWN = 11x (0x + 11x)
    9.) GHOST IN THE SHELL = 10x (1x + 9x)
    " ) PULP FICTION = 10x (1x + 9x)

    9x + several times on TV:
    – BULLITT
    – PAYBACK

    I did see the following films so many times on TV that I can count them also as seen more than 10 times:
    EL DORADO / STAR TREK VI / THE GREAT ESCAPE / THE MALTESE FALCON / SINGIN' IN THE RAIN / NORTH BY NORTHWEST / CASABLANCA / THE CINCINNATI KID / THE STING / HATARI! / TO CATCH A THIEF / BEN-HUR / A BRIDGE TOO FAR / IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE / GOLDFINGER / THE LADYKILLERS / VERA CRUZ / THE BIG COUNTRY / WESTWORLD

  73. 25 or more times:

    The Spy Who Loved Me
    Saturday Night Fever
    My Fair Lady
    Blazing Saddles
    Die Hard
    Die Hard 2
    Jaws

    At least 10 times:

    Dave
    The Fifth Element
    Young Frankenstein
    Thunderball
    Goldfinger
    Casino Royale (both Peter Sellers and Daniel Craig versions)
    2001: A Space Odyssey
    A Clockwork Orange
    Doctor Zhivago
    Mary Poppins
    The Sound of Music
    Camelot
    Grease
    Star Wars
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind

    …. and so many more!

  74. This is too difficult, but the main offenders:

    “Moonstruck” – every New Year’s Eve since 1988.
    “Grease” – 12 times in the theater in 1978 alone!
    “The Wizard of Oz” – I think I’ve purchased at least 10 home video incarnations.
    “Titanic”
    “Cabaret” – twice a year, I’m obsessed.
    “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?”
    “The Ten Commandments”
    “The Silence of the Lambs”
    “Howards End”
    “The Hours”

    I’ll leave it at 10, but there are dozens more…

  75. When I put a plus after the number it is I have seen it at least that number plus some.

    25 Time or more:
    Star Wars (1977) 53+ (Theater 7 times)
    Star Wars: Empire Strikes Back 46+
    Star Wars: Return Of The Jedi 39+
    Raiders Of The Lost Ark 29+
    Tombstone 25+
    Terminator and Terminator 2 30+
    Rambo First Blood 22+
    Alien 25+
    Aliens 25+
    Lethal Weapon 25+

    10 Times or more:
    Heat
    Wizard Of Oz 18+
    Sound Of Music
    The Matrix
    My Fair Lady
    ET 17+
    Close Encounters
    Harry Potter Series
    Star Trek 1,2,3 18+
    ID4
    Unforgiven
    Men In Black
    Speed
    Die Hard & Die Hard 2
    The Fifth Element
    Marry Poppins
    Behind Enemy Lines
    Jurassic Park
    Dirty Harry
    Sudden Impact
    Spy Who Loved Me
    Moonraker
    Law Abiding Citzen
    Lethal Weapon 2,3 & 4
    Planet Of The Apes 1968
    Lord Of The Rings Trilogy
    Saving Private Ryan 12+
    The Dark Knight
    Pinocchio
    Singin In The Rain 1952
    Second Hand Lion
    Rudy
    Resident Evil
    The Patriot
    Indiana Jones And The Last Crusade
    Gone With The Wind
    Braveheart
    Fast & The Furrious
    King And I
    X Men
    X Men United
    X Men Last Stand
    Pirates Of The Caribbean: Curse Of The Black Pearl 17+
    Pirates Of The Caribbean: Dad Man’s Chest
    Pirates Of The Caribbean: Worlds End

    I am sure I missed a few.

  76. Most of my favorite movies fall into this category.

    In particular, I watched Aladdin so many times that the VHS broke simply from overuse and I had to head to eBay to buy another one when it was out of print, long before the DVD came out. True story.

    My all-tome in-theater record for a single theatrical release is Slumdog Millionaire with six. This doesn't count movies that have been re-released; if it's a childhood favorite, in particular, I'll usually go back, and I didn't track how many times I went as a kid like I do now. I've seen The Lion King in theaters three times since its original release, once in its 2002-3 IMAX engagement and twice during the 2011 wide reissue. So, if you added those to however many times I went in 1994, which I'm guessing was two or three, it might match or exceed Slumdog in total views, but I'm not positive.

    I would love to see Aladdin again in a theater, but Disney has constantly passed over it for re-release, so I haven't had the opportunity since 1992-3.

  77. "Many of my friends and I were then intensely interested in this admittedly unscientific survey question and frequented those revival theaters almost weekly as well as watching modern movies in regular theaters even more frequently.

    Have to say the results were shockingly obvious. In virtually every case, a good/great older movie KICKED ASS with the audiences in terms of eliciting an emotional response the filmmakers clearly intended to elicit. They laughed big where the laughs were meant to come, they dabbed away tears, gasped in fear, were gripped with tension and worry over what would happen next and so on. Those movies took their audience for a group "ride" that felt glorious. Not in absolutely every case, of course. But often and consistently enough to suggest this was no mere accomplishment of a rare few classics.

    Meanwhile, for the most part, the emotional "ride" provided by those then modern 1980s/1990s films was as tepid as hours old dishwater. Not saying the stories, filmmaking techniques and performances were bad exactly. It's just that audiences somehow managed to watch them in more of a passive state, not really being required or even asked by the filmmakers to produce much of an emotional response. Yes, there were exceptions here and there. But precious few."

    Cineman, that is such a wise reply, and it mirrors my own experiences exactly. I remember, quite recently, seeing a revival of the ORIGINAL (Lana Turner) "Postman Always Rings Twice", and, when it ended, the cinema was absolutely abuzz with people turning to total strangers around them or behind them to TALK about the movie. At the end of a revival of "Three-Ten to Yuma", the audience applauded, and I was so touched, because it was always, in my mind, right up there with the great westerns, and I thought no one else cared. The last time, and the second and third-last times, that "A Star is Born" (the Garland one) was revived, the audience applauded IN THE MIDDLE, as if they were at a live concert. "North by Northwest" ALWAYS gets applause.I could go on and on. Those old filmmakers (in order, Tay Garnett, Delmer Daves, George Cukor, Alfred Hitchcock) knew how to INVOLVE the audience.

    Now go back to five years ago, when my teenage daughters were working in a snack bar in a cinema complex (showing only new movies), and needed picking up. While I waited for them, I used to watch the audiences coming out of two or three different sessions. I never knew, of course, WHAT films they were coming out of. But it didn't matter. The response was always the same. Each group walked out like zombies, not looking at each other, not smiling, not saying a word… just thinking about where they had parked the car. The impression they always gave was, "Well, we did our duty, and now that's over, so let's just move on." This went on month after month for nearly two years. I never ever noticed one person — young or old — who looked like they had just had an experience of ANY kind, much less one that they were involved with. I don't know what it is, you tell me: is it the directors, the actors, the script? Somehow, movies have lost contact with the audience, and people seem to go along to the latest tepid offering because… well, because you HAVE to, don't you? That's just what everyone does! Well, that's a sad comment on the entertainment industry of the twenty-first century.

    Thanks for posting such a deep analysis. Is there a solution, I wonder?

  78. “The Empire Strikes Back” at least 30 times. Worked at a movie theatre and we had agreements with others so employees could go to shows free of charge.

    “Aliens”, “Titanic”, “The Abyss”, pretty much anything James Cameron does.

  79. AlanJ

    "Many of my friends and I were then intensely interested in this admittedly unscientific survey question and frequented those revival theaters almost weekly as well as watching modern movies in regular theaters even more frequently.

    Have to say the results were shockingly obvious. In virtually every case, a good/great older movie KICKED ASS with the audiences in terms of eliciting an emotional response the filmmakers clearly intended to elicit. They laughed big where the laughs were meant to come, they dabbed away tears, gasped in fear, were gripped with tension and worry over what would happen next and so on. Those movies took their audience for a group "ride" that felt glorious. Not in absolutely every case, of course. But often and consistently enough to suggest this was no mere accomplishment of a rare few classics.

    Meanwhile, for the most part, the emotional "ride" provided by those then modern 1980s/1990s films was as tepid as hours old dishwater. Not saying the stories, filmmaking techniques and performances were bad exactly. It's just that audiences somehow managed to watch them in more of a passive state, not really being required or even asked by the filmmakers to produce much of an emotional response. Yes, there were exceptions here and there. But precious few."

    Cineman, that is such a wise reply, and it mirrors my own experiences exactly. I remember, quite recently, seeing a revival of the ORIGINAL (Lana Turner) "Postman Always Rings Twice", and, when it ended, the cinema was absolutely abuzz with people turning to total strangers around them or behind them to TALK about the movie. At the end of a revival of "Three-Ten to Yuma", the audience applauded, and I was so touched, because it was always, in my mind, right up there with the great westerns, and I thought no one else cared. The last time, and the second and third-last times, that "A Star is Born" (the Garland one) was revived, the audience applauded IN THE MIDDLE, as if they were at a live concert. "North by Northwest" ALWAYS gets applause.I could go on and on. Those old filmmakers (in order, Tay Garnett, Delmer Daves, George Cukor, Alfred Hitchcock) knew how to INVOLVE the audience.

    Now go back to five years ago, when my teenage daughters were working in a snack bar in a cinema complex (showing only new movies), and needed picking up. While I waited for them, I used to watch the audiences coming out of two or three different sessions. I never knew, of course, WHAT films they were coming out of. But it didn't matter. The response was always the same. Each group walked out like zombies, not looking at each other, not smiling, not saying a word… just thinking about where they had parked the car. The impression they always gave was, "Well, we did our duty, and now that's over, so let's just move on." This went on month after month for nearly two years. I never ever noticed one person — young or old — who looked like they had just had an experience of ANY kind, much less one that they were involved with. I don't know what it is, you tell me: is it the directors, the actors, the script? Somehow, movies have lost contact with the audience, and people seem to go along to the latest tepid offering because… well, because you HAVE to, don't you? That's just what everyone does! Well, that's a sad comment on the entertainment industry of the twenty-first century.

    Thanks for posting such a deep analysis. Is there a solution, I wonder?

    We used to live near Detroit and were lucky to have the Detroit Theater Organ club not too far away. On a regular basis they had silent movies with organ accompaniment. One showing was a Laurel & Hardy festival. The laughter in the theater was long and loud through the entire presentation. No widescreen – no color – no sound (talking) yet the audience was howling. This wasn't just older adults (although I doubt many of us went to the show in 1920) this included kids and TEENAGERS. A good movie was and is a good movie.

    Perhaps it's as Ben Mankiewicz has stated – Movies before Hollywood knew how to blow stuff up.

  80. Vertigo
    Days of Heaven
    The Lion in Winter
    Women in Love
    Sunset Blvd
    All About Eve
    After Hours
    The Egyptian
    Journey to the Center of the Earth
    Cleopatra
    Lolita
    Room With a View
    Howard’s End
    Chinatown
    Rosemary’s Baby
    The Sound of Music
    Doctor Zhivago
    Psycho
    The Pink Panther
    A Shot in the Dark
    The Nun’s Story
    Gypsy
    Splendor in the Grass
    The Sand Pebbles
    The Innocents
    SOB
    The Yellow Rolls Royce
    Move Over Darling
    The Apartment
    Body Heat
    La Dolce Vita
    The Cardinal
    El Cid
    West Side Story
    Midnight Cowboy
    Passage to India
    Law of Desire
    Little Shop of Horrors ( musical version)
    Hud
    In Harms Way
    The Searchers
    Jules and Jim
    Grand Prix
    What a Way to Go!
    To Kill A Mockingbird
    Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
    L’Avventura
    Barry Lyndon
    2001
    Patton
    Youth
    The Great Beauty
    Il Gattopardo
    The Conformist
    The Sheltering Sky
    Bob and Ted and Carol and Alice
    and many more ….

  81. Skatetown USA (1979)
    Star Wars Original Trilogy (1977-1983)
    Star Wars, The Phantom Menace (1999)
    Star Trek, The Motion Picture (1979)
    Star Trek II, The Wrath Of Khan (1982)
    Star Trek III, The Search For Spock (1984)
    Star Trek, Generations (1994)
    Goldfinger (1964)
    Thunderball (1966)
    Diamonds Are Forever (1971)
    The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)
    Moonraker (1979)
    Licence To Kill (1989)
    Goldeneye (1995)
    The World Is Not Enough (1999)
    Casablanca (1942)
    Way Way Out (1966)

  82. Martin Dew

    Jaws
    Where Eagles Dare
    North by Northwest
    Apocalypse Now
    Ben-Hur
    Schindler's List

    Yup,

    Where Eagles Dare

    and The Dirty Dozen

    Both films we used to rent them in our high school in 16mm (remember those?) for fundraisers. My father had a Bell & Howell 16mm projector and since I was the projectionist at school, I took the films home over the weekend and used to watch them endlessly.

    To this list I must add: The Great Race, Doctor Zhivago, Grand Prix, Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines, The Magus, and Woodstock, among others…

    Good Memories !

    Raul

  83. I decided to go back over these lists. What a wonderful diversity of choices. Because of the selections I am obtaining movies I had not watched and re-watching others that I had neglected. For everyone that posted – Thanks. Anybody else want to share?

  84. Mysto

    I decided to go back over these lists. What a wonderful diversity of choices. Because of the selections I am obtaining movies I had not watched and re-watching others that I had neglected. For everyone that posted – Thanks. Anybody else want to share?

    I couldn't agree more This is ultimately one of the things that draws me here most.

  85. Jake Lipson

    Most of my favorite movies fall into this category.

    In particular, I watched Aladdin so many times that the VHS broke simply from overuse and I had to head to eBay to buy another one when it was out of print, long before the DVD came out. True story.

    My all-tome in-theater record for a single theatrical release is Slumdog Millionaire with six. This doesn't count movies that have been re-released; if it's a childhood favorite, in particular, I'll usually go back, and I didn't track how many times I went as a kid like I do now. I've seen The Lion King in theaters three times since its original release, once in its 2002-3 IMAX engagement and twice during the 2011 wide reissue. So, if you added those to however many times I went in 1994, which I'm guessing was two or three, it might match or exceed Slumdog in total views, but I'm not positive.

    I would love to see Aladdin again in a theater, but Disney has constantly passed over it for re-release, so I haven't had the opportunity since 1992-3.

    I watch movies in a "theater" every night. A dedicated home theater room trumps commercial theaters in pretty much every category. If you have one that's awesome. If not, you probably don't know what you're missing.

  86. John Dirk

    I watch movies in a "theater" every night. A dedicated home theater room trumps commercial theaters in pretty much every category. If you have one that's awesome. If not, you probably don't know what you're missing.

    Finally I've figured out a way to have my own theater. Only had it for about 3 months after over 70 years of waiting. The room is a part time guest room part time home theater. We only have room for two (four if we crowd) but I have DTS 5.1 and a 140" screen (and that's at about 10 feet), I love it.:razz:opcorn:

  87. John Dirk

    I watch movies in a "theater" every night. A dedicated home theater room trumps commercial theaters in pretty much every category. If you have one that's awesome. If not, you probably don't know what you're missing.

    Finally I've figured out a way to have my own theater. Only had it for about 3 months after over 70 years of waiting. The room is a part time guest room part time home theater. We only have room for two (four if we crowd) but I have DTS 5.1 and a 140" screen (and that's at about 10 feet), I love it.:razz:opcorn:

  88. Mysto

    Finally I've figured out a way to have my own theater. Only had it for about 3 months after over 70 years of waiting. The room is a part time guest room part time home theater. We only have room for two (four if we crowd) but I have DTS 5.1 and a 140" screen (and that's at about 10 feet), I love it.:razz:opcorn:

    Mine seats five and, with respect to others, I like it that way.

  89. Mysto

    Finally I've figured out a way to have my own theater. Only had it for about 3 months after over 70 years of waiting. The room is a part time guest room part time home theater. We only have room for two (four if we crowd) but I have DTS 5.1 and a 140" screen (and that's at about 10 feet), I love it.:razz:opcorn:

    Mine seats five and, with respect to others, I like it that way.

  90. Idiocracy

    (Watched it too many times).

    Out of all the optical discs I have, Idiocracy has had an extremely high replay value for me. I have probably watched it over 100-200+ times already.

  91. Idiocracy

    (Watched it too many times).

    Out of all the optical discs I have, Idiocracy has had an extremely high replay value for me. I have probably watched it over 100-200+ times already.

  92. jcroy

    The only other thing I've watched over 100+ times already, is season 1 of the original Battlestar Galactica.

    That is something. I have a few that maybe have hit 20 but nothing in the 100 times range. It's great you have found something you enjoy that much.

  93. jcroy

    The only other thing I've watched over 100+ times already, is season 1 of the original Battlestar Galactica.

    That is something. I have a few that maybe have hit 20 but nothing in the 100 times range. It's great you have found something you enjoy that much.

  94. Mysto

    That is something. I have a few that maybe have hit 20 but nothing in the 100 times range. It's great you have found something you enjoy that much.

    This was over a 10+ years time period. Mostly playing it in the background when I'm at home.

  95. Mysto

    That is something. I have a few that maybe have hit 20 but nothing in the 100 times range. It's great you have found something you enjoy that much.

    This was over a 10+ years time period. Mostly playing it in the background when I'm at home.

  96. I've genuinely lost count on how many times I've watched the movies that make up the list of my top-40 movies of all-time, but I would wager I've seen each anywhere from 10 to 35 times apiece (ah, the wonders of home video, and playing movies in the background while doing homework to help me focus).

    Lawrence of Arabia
    Rear Window
    Casablanca
    The Red Shoes
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Back to the Future
    Brief Encounter
    Hot Fuzz
    The Departed
    Heat
    The Searchers
    The Big Country
    Doctor Zhivago
    From Russia With Love
    The Andromeda Strain (1971)
    Jaws
    The Magnificent Seven (1960)
    Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
    Rio Bravo
    Seven Samurai
    Kingdom of Heaven
    Dogma
    Monty Python's Life of Brian
    The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly
    Gandhi
    Captain America: The Winter Soldier
    Patton
    Pulp Fiction
    Clerks II
    Star Trek: The Motion Picture
    Forbidden Planet
    To Catch a Thief
    The Shoes of the Fisherman
    Mallrats
    The Hunt for Red October
    Blazing Saddles
    Cleopatra (1963)
    The Wind and the Lion
    Die Hard
    Spartacus

  97. I've genuinely lost count on how many times I've watched the movies that make up the list of my top-40 movies of all-time, but I would wager I've seen each anywhere from 10 to 35 times apiece (ah, the wonders of home video, and playing movies in the background while doing homework to help me focus).

    Lawrence of Arabia
    Rear Window
    Casablanca
    The Red Shoes
    Fiddler on the Roof
    Back to the Future
    Brief Encounter
    Hot Fuzz
    The Departed
    Heat
    The Searchers
    The Big Country
    Doctor Zhivago
    From Russia With Love
    The Andromeda Strain (1971)
    Jaws
    The Magnificent Seven (1960)
    Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
    Rio Bravo
    Seven Samurai
    Kingdom of Heaven
    Dogma
    Monty Python's Life of Brian
    The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly
    Gandhi
    Captain America: The Winter Soldier
    Patton
    Pulp Fiction
    Clerks II
    Star Trek: The Motion Picture
    Forbidden Planet
    To Catch a Thief
    The Shoes of the Fisherman
    Mallrats
    The Hunt for Red October
    Blazing Saddles
    Cleopatra (1963)
    The Wind and the Lion
    Die Hard
    Spartacus

  98. jcroy

    The only other thing I've watched over 100+ times already, is season 1 of the original Battlestar Galactica.

    Wow – But I can understand. I also love the original series. It had a "human" character that is lacking in the current crop of films and series out there.

  99. John Dirk

    Wow – But I can understand. I also love the original series. It had a "human" character that is lacking in the current crop of films and series out there.

    I think for me it was largely a nostalgia thing. It was one of the first non-cartoon shows I latched onto when I was a kid/preteen.

    If I had never seen it at that age and/or if I was much older or younger, most likely I wouldn't think much of it. Basically another generic semi-cheesy sci-fi tv show, out of many others.

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