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In more news from high-end purveyors McIntosh, the company has announced the arrival of the MDA200 D/A Converter. The new deck will allow customers to add premium digital music capabilities to an analog audio system. The unit is priced at $4,000 and available this month.

The MDA200 uses the McIntosh DA2 digital audio module which also appears in the MA12000 integrated amplifier and C2700 and C53 preamplifiers. The MDA200 now offers this architecture as a standalone D/A converter. McIntosh says the DA2 is powered by a next-gen, Quad balanced, 8-channel, 32-bit digital-to-analog converter. This “audiophile-grade” DAC features enhanced dynamic range and improved total harmonic distortion. The DA2 supports high resolution digital audio playback, as the USB input supports native playback of up to DSD512 and DXD up to 384kHz, while the coax and optical inputs can decode digital music up to 24-bit/192kHz.

The MDA200 includes seven digital audio inputs: 2 x coaxial, 2 x optical, 1 x USB, 1 x MCT (to pair with the brand’s MCT series of SACD/CD Transports), and 1 x audio-only HDMI ARC connection. The product further serves as an upgrade to replace older D/A converters that may now be obsolete. McIntosh says that as digital music formats and technologies change and improve over time, the DA2 is designed to be replaced by a newer digital audio module in the future. This positions the MDA200 as a “timeless investment”.

As well as carrying HDMI ARC for TV and movies, the MDA200 is Roon Tested and uses balanced and unbalanced analog outputs. McIntosh’s signature design elements are included, namely the illuminated logo, rotary control knobs, aluminum end caps and black glass faceplate.

 

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Published by

Martin Dew

editor